Week #3

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  • Salad Mix – if you haven’t tried my salad dressing recipe yet we encourage you to make a batch for the salad this week. There is nothing like spring salad
  • Spinach – a staple in our diets, good to eat at least once a week (you will probably see this featured for at least the next 9 weeks!)
  • Turnips or radishes -tender white turnips, best if peeled, the radishes can be eaten with skin on. Use the tops as well in the “radish top soup recipe below”.
  • Chinese broccoli or cauliflower – We have two lovely beds of Chinese Broccoli just coming on so that we can feed everyone, eat the stems and leaves it is all tender and sweet. This is the last of the cauliflower L. We planted hundreds of plants with different harvest dates and they all came 1-3 months ahead of schedule. Try it roasted with a little Pecorino cheese grated on top!
  • Chard or kale
  • Green garlic – this is young garlic that is just starting to bulb. Peel the outer leaves away and chop the whole shoot up and use as a garlic flavor for soups or sauces. Don’t use the very top 1/3 as that may be too fiberous.
  • Walnuts
  • Shallots – use as you would any onion, we love to roast them with a little olive oil and just eat them as a vegetable with dinner.

We have had a busy week. Juve managed to get the entire field composted and tilled  and ready for planting. We put out the first zucchini, seeded carrots, beets and radishes outside. We continue to transplant lettuce every week along with scallions to have a steady supply. We transplanted the first peppers into the hoop house in hopes of sweet peppers in July. The sugar snaps are already blooming in one of our greenhouses!

We had the fourth graders last week and this week we had the Environmental AP class from Liberty. As this was their second visit we could get right to work. They stopped in the kitchen first to put on a pot of wonton soup and prep the filling of the wontons. Then the whole group filled flats and managed to get all the winter squash and pumpkins seeded (over 30 flats!). Then we headed out to the field to transplant onions! That was great, we got over 600 feet of onions planted in about an hour. That is a job that usually takes me about 10 hours.

We cleaned up and harvest some bok choi, tasted some spinach in the hoop house and came back to assemble the soup. We added some sautéed beet greens with green garlic on top of the bok choi and wonton soup, it was so great to see everyone enjoy their veggies. As a reward the group got to feed and brush the goats and Felipe. They will visit one more time before the academic year is over and help transplant the beans and squash they helped seed.

We still have lots to get done as we move into warm loving plants like eggplant, peppers and tomatoes. It is still too early to plant them out in the field, but boy is it tempting. It has dropped into the high thirties many nights and frosted pretty good one night. We may not be able to resist a trial of some tomatoes later this week.

The Beaverton Farmers Market opens next Saturday May 2. I will be there with all the plant starts ready to go out in your yards. Please stop by and see me from 8 – 1:30. I sell with Polly from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens so look for me under that banner. I have plant starts available at the farm and have sent out an order form to you all. Get them back to me soon so I can seed especially for you. I will also be at Catlin Gable School on May 3 from 12 – 4 selling starts.

We will put out a sign-up sheet for help with the harvest in the next week or so. We can use extra hands once it comes to pea season.

Raw Green Garlic Uses: mince and add to salads, pound into a paste to make green garlic aioli, use in salad dressings, sprinkle onto any creation using bread or noodles with cheese

Cooked Green Garlic Uses: Poach the last 4″ of the tips and dress with a mustard vinaigrette, dice and saute the tender portions and add to an omelet or frittata, chop and add to stir frys, chop and add to soup.

Green Garlic Soup Au Gratin

8 Stalks Green Garlic
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Butter
2 Tablespoons Butter, plus 2 teaspoons Butter
8 sl Day-old Bread
1 1/4 c chicken or vegetable Broth
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1/2 c Parmesan Cheese, grated

Remove and discard upper third of garlic stalks; (green leaf ends) thinly slice bulb. Heat olive oil and 1 T butter until beginning to foam. Add garlic; saute 1-2 minutes. Reduce heat, cover tightly, and cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Spread bread with 2 T butter; oven toast until lightly golden. Add broth to garlic, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Ladle into 2 oven-proof serving bowls; cover with toasted bread and top with cheese. Dot each with a teaspoon of butter. Bake at 450F for 10 minutes, until cheese has melted and begun to turn golden.

 

 

Lentil Walnut Spread

1 cup lentils
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
salt and black or red pepper to taste

  1. Wash the lentils, cover with cold water, bring to a boil, and cook until soft, about 1 hour.
  2. Drain the lentils and combine with the remaining ingredients in a food processor. Blend until smooth, adding water as necessary to achieve a spreadable consistency.
  3. Correct seasoning.

Serves 8

Radish Top Soup

 

Don’t through out your radish greens.  Believe it or not, those fuzzy leaves can be transformed into a smooth green soup, with a hint of watercress flavor.

 

6 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onions or white part of leek

8 cups loosely packed radish leaves

2 cups diced potatoes

6 cups liquid (water, chicken stock or combo)

salt

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

freshly ground pepper

 

Melt 4 T butter in a large saucepan, add onions or leeks and cook until golden, approximately 5 minutes.  Stir in radish tops cover pan and cook over low heat until wilted, 8-10 minutes.  Meanwhile cook potatoes until soft in liquid along with 1 teaspoon of salt.  Combine with the radish tops and cook covered, for 5 minutes to mingle flavors.  Puree finely in a food processor of food mill.  Ad the cream if desired and enrich with 2 T of butter.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve hot. (serves 4-6)

 

Moroccan Chicken and Turnip Stew

 

2 cups cooked chickpeas

2 small (2 1/2 lb) chickens

3 Tb butter

1 Tb oil

2 onions

5 cups chicken stock

1/2 tsp white pepper

1/4 tsp ground ginger

1/8 tsp powdered saffron

1/2 tsp turmeric

1 lb small turnips

2 cups chopped turnip leaves and stems

1/4 cup lemon juice

Salt and Pepper to taste

 

Rinse chickpeas in water and rub lightly to remove skins; drain and set aside. Cut chickens into quarters, removing wing tips and backbones; put them aside for stock. Melt butter and oil in a casserole and lightly brown chicken on all sides, cooking in two batches if necessary. Slice onions and stir into butter and oil to color. Then add the chickpeas, stock, pepper, ginger, saffron, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add turnips and greens and simmer 20 minutes more. Remove chicken and turnips to a covered warm dish. Boil sauce to reduce, mashing some of the chickpeas against the side of the pan to thicken the sauce; it may take 10-15 minutes to produce a nice thick sauce. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Reheat the chicken and turnips in the sauce and serve.   Serves 6 to 8.  From The Victory Garden Cookbook.

Chinese Broccoli

(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)

1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem

2-4 cloves of garlic minced

1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce

¼ cup water

Olive oil

Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #2

Salad mix: “Salanova” lettuce makes her debut this week. This is a special lettuce, bred by Johnny’s seeds to make only small leaves even when fully mature. We have selected the varieties we like best with dramatic colors and varied leaf size. She is just starting so stay tuned.

Arugula: it is a new variety this year called “speedy”. Honestly she is not speedy. We seeded this arugula in the depths of winter (January and February) and it took forever to grow and now it is bolting! The flavor is good and makes a super salad on its own or mixed into the salad lettuce. We will try it again in the fall, probably the best for late fall and winter production.

Radishes: As many of you know we love radishes and usually have tons. This spring with the rains one of our green houses had a huge wet spot and had variable germination. We will alternate with Arugula.

Shallots: these are one of our favorite aliums (onion family). They pungent and give a lot of punch to salad dressings. They can be roasted, pickled or made into shallot “jam”. I am planning on roasting them and adding them to my spinach and egg flan for Easter brunch.

Spinach: Don’t be intimidated by the huge leaves. They cook down and can be added to stir fries, soups or made into creamed spinach. We love the spinach soup, you cook the spinach for only 5 minutes and the soup is a lovely bright green.

Walnuts: These were gathered from our enormous walnut tree that graces the center of our farm. We figure it was planted in 1915, when the barn was built. It is a grafted tree black walnut root stock and English walnut as the cultivar. We gathered them and dried them last fall. This will be the last of them until the fall.

Kale or chard or collards: We are finishing up the fall planted kale and moving into the early spring kale. Enjoy the sweet leaves as the frost this week makes them so.

Sprouting broccoli or Chinese Broccoli: This is the last of the purple sprouting broccoli. The heat this weekend will cause it all to flower. The Chinese broccoli is just coming on but does not like 80 – 100 degree weather.

Bok Choi: a versatile vegetable that tends to absorb the flavor of the sauce or soup it is cooked with. I have included our favorite recipe which we have made twice this week. The pork ribs make it! The recipe seems involved, but it is really not difficult to make and makes a hearty meal. You could add the spinach too towards the end for more greens.

The weather is not doing us any favors. It got down to 32 degrees earlier this week and will be at least 80 degrees today. Many plants to not understand this type of flux in weather and get the message they have gone through winter and it is time to make seed. We can do “everything right” as farmers and Mother Nature throws a curve ball. That is why we keep trying new things, planting crops over and over trying to get them to the right combination of fertility, temperature and water.

Speaking of water, it has been dry! Juve is busy trying to get irrigation on the crops we have planted outside. It is always a challenge at this time of year to get all that needs to be done, completed by the end of the day.

We went crazy and got a whole new set of laying hens. Of course they are just days old and will need to grow for the next 4-6 months to take over the duty of their sisters that we have currently producing eggs. They are delicate and require care, heat and good luck. We also got a whole bunch of meat chickens. Again we will have to wait and see how many survive before we get out there and try and sell them.

We will spend the week planting the alliums. These are the onion family. We have about 700 feet of them to plant and it always feels like such an accomplishment when they are in the ground and we can move on to tomatoes and peppers.

Diego and two high school friends hosted a group of fourth graders on the farm. They gave them a tour and taught them about seeding, transplanting and harvesting and then shared a meal of wonton soup. Everyone seemed to enjoy themselves. We will have a group of high school students out to the farm this Thursday to do much of the same. We hope to get the winter squash seeded, lay water lines and transplant the leeks. I am always more ambitious about what can be accomplished in a short time especially with novice workers!

We have vegetable starts available for our subscribers that want to plant their own garden at home. They will be ready in May. I have sent a list to subscribers. Polly (from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens) and I have worked at the Beaverton Farmers Market for over 10 years selling vegetable seedlings and our season starts the first week on May. We are there from 8 – 1:30 every Saturday. We will have a sale on April 25th and 26th with Birthing Way Midwifery School at the parking lot of Ben and Jerry’s on Hawthorne. I will be at Catlin Gable School on May 3rd from 11 – 4 also selling vegetable seedlings. Lots of opportunities to get the very best for your garden.

It is Time to head out to harvest before it gets too hot.

WONTON SOUP WITH BOK CHOY
For soup
2 lb country-style (meaty) pork ribs
2 lb chicken thighs, legs, and wings
4 scallions, coarsely chopped
1 (2-inch) piece peeled fresh ginger, chopped
12 cups water
1 1/2 lb bok choy, leaves halved lengthwise, then stalks and leaves thinly sliced crosswise
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper \

For wontons
1/2 lb ground pork (not lean)
1 large egg yolk
2 scallions, finely chopped
1 (1 1/2-inch) piece peeled fresh ginger, finely chopped
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon rice vinegar (not seasoned)
1/2 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
About 30 wonton wrappers, thawed if frozen
Make broth:
Simmer pork ribs, chicken, scallions, ginger, and water in a 6- to 8-quart tall narrow stockpot, uncovered, until meat is very tender and falling apart, 4 1/2 to 5 hours. Pour broth through a sieve into a large bowl and discard solids. Cool broth, uncovered, then chill, covered, at least 1 1/2 hours.

Make wontons:
Stir together pork, yolk, scallions, ginger, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, salt, and white pepper in a bowl in 1 direction with your hand until just combined (do not overwork, or filling will be tough). Put 1 wonton wrapper on a work surface (keep remaining wrappers covered with plastic wrap). Spoon a rounded teaspoon of filling in center of square, then brush water around edges. Lift 2 opposite corners together to form a triangle and enclose filling, pressing edges firmly around mound of filling to eliminate air pockets and seal. Moisten opposite corners of long side. Curl moistened corners toward each other, overlapping one on top of the other, and carefully press corners together to seal. Make more wontons in same manner.

Finish soup:
Skim any fat from broth, then bring to a simmer in a 5- to 6-quart pot. Stir in bok choy, salt, and white pepper and simmer, uncovered, until bok choy is crisp-tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Add wontons and simmer, uncovered, gently stirring, until filling is just cooked through, about 3 minutes (cut 1 open to check).

Cooks’ notes:
• Broth can be chilled up to 1 day.
• Wontons can be made 1 month ahead. Freeze in 1 layer on a plastic-wrap-lined baking sheet until firm, about 30 minutes, then transfer to a sealable plastic bag and keep frozen.

Gourmet
January 2004

Whole-Wheat Penne With Walnut Pesto and Kale

Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Lacinato kale, also called Tuscan, black or dinosaur kale, is narrow leafed, dark blue-green and crinkly. Other varieties of kale may be substituted if lacinato is unavailable. Be sure not to toast the nuts too long; burned nuts will make the pesto taste very acrid. Whole-wheat pasta varies widely in flavor and texture; Imported Bionaturale brand, which is sold at New Seasons Markets, is one of my favorites. If you prefer, regular pasta may be substituted for whole-wheat.

  • 11/2 cups walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped (divided; see note)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
  • Pinch granulated sugar
  • 1 cup finely grated parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces), plus additional for serving
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 bunches fresh lacinato kale, stemmed, coarsely chopped and rinsed well
  • 1 pound whole-wheat penne rigate pasta

Combine 1 cup walnuts, garlic, thyme and pinch sugar in food processor and process until evenly ground, about 15 seconds. Add cheese and oil and process just until blended, about 4 seconds, scraping down sides of work bowl as necessary. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper; set pesto aside.

In a large pot, bring 4 quarts of water to a boil, add salt and greens and cook until tender, about 4 minutes. Leaving the boiling water on the heat, use tongs or long-handled strainer to transfer greens to large bowl of cold water to stop cooking. When greens are cool, drain and squeeze firmly between hands to remove excess moisture. Coarsely chop greens and set aside.

Add pasta to the boiling water and cook according to directions on package. Drain pasta through colander, reserving 1/2 cup pasta water. Return pasta to pot and toss with pesto until well-coated. Add reserved pasta water, as necessary, to moisten pasta. Using tongs, distribute cooked greens through pasta; season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide pasta among bowls and serve garnished with remaining 1/2 cup walnuts and additional grated parmesan as desired. Note: To toast nuts, spread on baking sheet and bake in 350-degree oven for 5 to 8 minutes or until they start to brown.

White House No-Cream Creamed Spinach

Published May 25, 2010

Makes 6 servings

This side dish is one of Michelle Obama’s favorites because it has a creamy texture without a lot of calories and fat. One person who’s not a fan, however, is Sasha Obama, who is turned off by the bright green color — a shade of the vegetable rainbow she has yet to embrace.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds baby spinach
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 shallots, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

Wash and clean the spinach. Place a large bowl of water near the sink, and put several handfuls of ice cubes in it. Place a colander in the sink.

Fill a medium-sized pot with water, and sprinkle in some salt. Place the pot on the stove and bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add 8 ounces of the spinach (about a quarter of the leaves) and let it boil for just 30 seconds.

Carefully pour the spinach and water into the colander to drain the spinach. Then, using tongs or a fork to handle the hot spinach, immediately “shock” the spinach by putting it into the ice water to stop the cooking process. Let the spinach sit in the cold water for a minute, then drain it again in the colander. Squeeze the spinach with your hands or press the spinach against the colander with the back of a spoon to remove excess water.

Place the cooked spinach in a blender and purée. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add shallots and garlic and cook until the shallots turn translucent, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the rest of the spinach leaves, tossing with a spoon and sautéing until the leaves are wilted. Add the puréed spinach and stir. Season with salt and pepper.

Adapted from White House Executive Chef Cristeta Comerford

 

Kale Salad (from Kris Schamp)

Flax oil (1/8 C)(I often use olive oil)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

(everything after this is just icing on the cake, I rarely add the below ingredients)

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  Can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

Arugula Pesto with Herbed Ricotta Gnocchi
Pesto
2 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted
1 1/2 cups arugula leaves, well rinsed and towel-dried
1 1/2 packed cups fresh spinach leaves, well rinsed and towel-dried
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Gnocchi
1 cup semolina flour
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chervil
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh fennel leaves
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 pound whole-milk ricotta cheese, drained
Olive oil, for tossing gnocchi
12 lemon gem marigolds

1. Make the pesto: With the motor running, drop the garlic through the feed tube of a food processor to mince. Add the pine nuts, arugula, spinach, and Parmesan and pulse until the greens are finely chopped. With the motor running, gradually add the oil to make a thick paste. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to a small bowl and cover tightly with plastic wrap. (The pesto can be made up to 2 hours ahead and kept at room temperature.)

2. Make the gnocchi: Place the semolina, chives, sage, chervil, fennel, salt, nutmeg, and pepper in the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine. Transfer to a medium bowl and, with your hands, blend in the ricotta. Flour your hands and knead the dough in the bowl until all the ingredients cling together. The dough will be sticky, but do not add more flour or the gnocchi will be heavy.

3. Line a baking sheet with waxed paper and dust with flour. Place about 1/3 cup of dough at a time on a lightly floured work surface and roll it underneath your palms to make a 1/2-inch-thick rope. Cut the rope into 3/4-inch-long pieces. Using the tines of a fork, press an indentation into each piece and place the gnocchi on the baking sheet. Repeat until all the dough is used.

4. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add the gnocchi and cook until they rise to the surface. Boil for 30 seconds, until the gnocchi are set but tender. Drain well. (The gnocchi can be made up to 4 hours ahead, rinsed under cold water and drained well.) Toss the gnocchi with olive oil and store at room temperature. To reheat, cook in a large nonstick skillet over low heat, or drop into boiling water to warm. Toss the hot gnocchi with the pesto, garnish with marigolds, and serve immediately.

The Complete Kitchen Garden
Text copyright © 2011 Ellen Ecker Ogden

Sherry Vinaigrette
adapted from Mediterranean Fresh, by Joyce Goldstein

¼ cup sherry vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced (optional)
S & P to taste
½ cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more to taste

Whisk all ingredients together in a small bowl.

Thyme, Rosemary, and Wine Vinegar Dressing
adapted from: Cooking with Friends, by Trish Deseine and Marie-Pierre Morel

1 cup olive oil
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1 tsp fresh rosemary leaves
Sea salt and black pepper

Blend the thyme and rosemary leaves in a food processor or crush them with a mortar and pestle. Put all the ingredients in a bowl and combine with a whisk.

Shallot Salad Dressing

1 spring shallot, cleaned and chopped, include most of the light green part
1/3 cup (or to taste) vinegar: we use champagne or sherry vingear
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
S & P to taste
3/4 cup best olive oil

Whirl everything in a blender or food processor. I use an immersion blender for this with the ‘jar’ that came with it: any jar will do. Super easy! You control the quality of the ingredients! enjoy.

Julia’s Favorite Daily Dressing

Into a mini blender jar (or small canning jar, they work with most American blenders), put in equal parts vinegar (balsamic or rice or sherry or?) or lemon juice, and olive oil. With S & P you’ve got dressing. Extras I like to add to this dressing: 1 roughly minced, peeled garlic clove, a small dollop of fancy mustard, and a small dollop of jam. Screw blender bottom onto the jar, then insert into the blender and whirl. You’ve got dressing! The variations are endless….

Low-Fat Blue Cheese Dressing
adapted from Cook’s Country
makes about 1 cup 8 servings
Use a great pungent cheese

1/2 cup low-fat plain yogurt
1/4 cup reduced fat mayo
1/4 cup crumbled blue cheese
2 Tablespoons water
1 clove garlic, grated (try a microplane!)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Whisk all ingredients in a medium bowl until smooth.

Lemon Shallot Vinaigrette

2 small shallots
2 Tablespoons Champagne vinegar
2 Tablespoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup extra‑virgin olive oil

Peel and dice the shallots very fine. Put them in a small bowl with the
vinegar, lemon juice, and salt. Stir and let the mixture sit for 10 to
30 minutes. Whisk in the olive oil. Makes about 3/4 cup.

Low-Fat Ranch Dressing
adapted from Cook’s Country
makes about 1 cup 8 servings

1/2 cup low fat plain yogurt
1/4 cup reduced fat mayo
1 Tablespoons water or buttermilk
1 teaspoons white wine vinegar
1 garlic clove, grated (try a microplane for this job)
1 Tablespoon minced chives
1 Tablespoon minced fresh cilantro
1 teaspoon minced fresh dill
1/4 teaspoon salt
pinch cayenne pepper

Whisk all ingredients in a medium bowl until smooth.

Tahini Dressing from Salad by Amy Nathan

1/2 Cup safflower oil
1/2 pound soft tofu
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
generous 1/4 cup tahini (julia says: use toasted for a richer flavor)
1 garlic clove, minced
1 scallion, chopped
2 Tablespoons tamari (soy sauce)
3/8 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt

Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor. (Julia says: I like to use my immersion blender in a tall jar). Adjust the thickness to your liking by adding water. This stores well if covered.

Tahini Dressing
Adapted from The Food and Philosophy of Kenny Shopsin by Shopsin and Carreno

1 cup tahini
3 Tablespoons good olive oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon minced fresh garlic
¼ teaspoon sugar
Combine everything with 2 cups of water in a blender and blend until smooth.

Dijon Vinaigrette

1/2 C extra virgin olive oil
2 T each plain non-fat yogurt, lemon juice and red wine vinegar
1 T Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons fresh herbs: thyme, rosemary, parsley, etc. or a mixture or dried, but use less if using dried.

Combine in a blender at medium-high speed. Chill overnight before serving.

From : Chef Andrew Cohen
Honey Mustard Cilantro Dressing
1C cilantro stems
1/4 C water
1/4 lime juice(or lime/lemon or lemon)
1/4 C honey
1/4 dijon mustard
salt and pepper to taste
1 small clove of garlic peeled(optional)
Puree in blender til smooth, then through opening in top add olive oil slowly until the hole at the center of the dressing disappears. This is usually the proper amount of oil for a properly emulsified vinaigrette.

Options: use some cayenne powder to heat it up. Use 3:1 basil to flat leaf parsley instead of cilantro and use red wine vinegar instead of citrus juice.

 

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Garbanzos y Acelgas

Chickpeas and chard (or spinach)

9 ounces of dried chickpeas

1 carrot, diced

1 sprig flat leaf parsley

1 bay leaf

2 yellow onions 1/3 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

9 ounces or 1 bunch chard, beet greens or spinach (more is even better)

2 eggs (hard boiled or fried and placed on top of each portion)

Put the chickpeas in a bowl, cover with cold water and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and put in a large saucepan with the carrot, parsley, bay leaf and half the chopped onion. Cover with water then bring to a boil and cook about 20 minutes or until almost tender. Add 2 teaspoons salt and half the oil and cook for another 10 minutes. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and cook the garlic and remaining onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomato and cook for 5 minutes. Stir the tomato mixture into the chickpea mixture (it should be wet enough to be saucy but not too soupy). Stir in the chard, beet greens or spinach. Cook for 5 minutes or until the greens are tender. Season well and serve with either the hard boiled egg or fried egg on top.

Posted on by Lyn Jacobs | Leave a comment

First Harvest 2015

Week #1 2015

  • Salad mix – enjoy “salanova” and “little gem” lettuce in this bright mix. You will need to wash it well several times as the baby slugs hang on to curly leaves. We recommend washing and spinning it all when you get it home and then it will be ready to use over the week. Try “Lyn’s salad dressing” recipe, the key is the white balsamic vinegar.
  • Spinach – this is “Emu” a huge leaved and tender spinach grown all winter long. The bunch may look huge but as you know spinach cooks down. We recommend the spinach soup or our new favorite “Garbanzos y Acelgas”.
  • Shallots- held over from last season, they need to be eaten soon. They can be used in place of onions in any recipe and we love to just roast them with a little olive oil and salt and pepper.
  • Walnuts – worth the work to crack them. All gathered from our giant walnut tree last fall.
  • Arugula or radishes – both a bit spicy all that March heat made both of them spice up. Thinly slicing them and adding a dressing will cut the heat
  • Kale – so many ways to eat kale! A few of our family favorite recipes are below, check the kale tab under recipes for more ideas. We eat crispy kale almost daily, the key is to massage the oil into the kale leaves, we grate Romano cheese on them and cook it at 350 F for 13 minutes.
  • Mustard and beet greens – a bunch of greens to use in any stir fry, some are spicy others are sweet. The bright burgundy is “Ruby Streaks Mizuna”, and the curly green is “green frizzy mustard”.
  • Sprouting broccoli or Chinese broccoli – This crop is really delicious. It is the end of the sprouting broccoli due to the warm March weather. That same heat brought on the Chinese broccoli quicker than usual so you should see about 5 more weeks of her. We love to make “crispy sprouting broccoli, similar to the kale just cooked a while longer (~20 minutes at 350 and I add the cheese in the last 5 minutes). The Chinese broccoli we stir fry in the recipe that follows.

Today is our season opening potluck and first harvest. It is a juggling act between harvesting, cleaning and cooking. We hope those that can will join us for the potluck to meet new members, share a meal and catch up on some of those old friendships. It is supposed to be cloudy but rain free, we will carry on rain or shine so see you sometime between 2 -6 p.m.

Mother Nature always throws us a few curve balls and this year is no different.  The relatively warm March sent all our overwintered kale and cauliflower to seed early. That meant none for our regular season customers. We scrambled to plant more kale inside and outside the hoop houses. The weather then cooled off considerably and the crops planted outside are suffering. Never fear, there are three beds of kale outside that will come soon enough that you will wonder when the kale will stop. Actually our goal is to have it as an offering every week. We try and offer kale or chard every week, good to eat those greens!

Now, I am off to cook and harvest.

Kale Salad (from Kris Schamp)

(A brief note: I use just kale, and red onion most of the time and it is delicious, this dressing recipe works well on most spicy greens like arugula and mustard as well)

 

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

 

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

 

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

 

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

 

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

 

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  You can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

Chinese Broccoli

(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)

1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem

2-4 cloves of garlic minced

1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce

¼ cup water

Olive oil

Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

Baked Crispy Kale Recipe
Servings:  4 as snack Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 20
The biggest secret to getting the kale super-crisp is to dry them in a salad spinner. If there is moisture on the leaves, the kale will steam, not crisp. Also, do not salt the kale until after they have come out of the oven. If you salt beforehand, the salt will just cause the kale to release moisture…thus steaming instead of crisping. I’ve also found that the convection setting on my oven works really well too – I set the convection on 325F and bake for about 10-15 minutes. Have fun with this recipe, I sometimes mix the salt with Cajun or Creole seasoning.

Ingredients:
4 giant handfuls of kale, torn into bite-sized pieces and tough stems removed (about 1/3 pound)
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
sea salt or kosher salt

(I like to grate parmesan cheese over them before baking)

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Place the kale leaves into a salad spinner and spin all of the water out of the kale. Dump the water and repeat one or two times more just to make sure that the kale is extra dizzy and dry. Use a towel to blot any extra water on the leaves. Place the kale on the baking sheet.

3. Drizzle olive oil over the kale leaves and use your hands to toss and coat the leaves. Bake in the oven for 12-20 minutes until leaves are crisp. Take a peek at the 12 minute mark – the timing all depends on how much olive oil you use. Just use a spatula or tongs to touch the leaves, if they are paper-thin crackly, the kale is done. If the leaves are still a bit soft, leave them in for another 2 minutes. Do not let the leaves turn brown (they’ll be burnt and bitter) Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and serve.

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

Spinach Soup

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is still delicious!)

  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 small carrot
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • ½ cup parsley leaves
  • 2 bunches young spinach
  • 2 sprigs fresh tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraiche
  • Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin.  Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

Serves 6

Garbanzos y Acelgas

Chickpeas and chard (or spinach)

9 ounces of dried chickpeas

1 carrot, diced

1 sprig flat leaf parsley

1 bay leaf

2 yellow onions 1/3 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

9 ounces or 1 bunch chard, beet greens or spinach (more is even better)

2 eggs (hard boiled or fried and placed on top of each portion)

Put the chickpeas in a bowl, cover with cold water and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and put in a large saucepan with the carrot, parsley, bay leaf and half the chopped onion. Cover with water then bring to a boil and cook about 20 minutes or until almost tender. Add 2 teaspoons salt and half the oil and cook for another 10 minutes. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and cook the garlic and remaining onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomato and cook for 5 minutes. Stir the tomato mixture into the chickpea mixture (it should be wet enough to be saucy but not too soupy). Stir in the chard, beet greens or spinach. Cook for 5 minutes or until the greens are tender. Season well and serve with either the hard boiled egg or fried egg on top.

Serves 4

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The Season Starts April 12th!

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The spring is a bit more typical than the end of winter. It has rained just enough to make it soggy out in the fields just when we need to get the onions planted. The atypical warm weather of March lured us into planting lettuce, kale, broccoli and cabbage a bit ahead of schedule, now it hangs in suspended animation. Almost all of the gorgeous cauliflower scheduled for the season opening is flowered, eaten and gone. You will get the last of the sprouting broccoli in the first week and then that too will be tilled under.

We have our opening potluck next weekend, April 12th from 2-6. Come with a dish to pass and a pizza topping. We will have fun rain or shine with good conversation, great food and farm tours. We had our first baby goats born yesterday so they should be jumping all over by the weekend. 7 more mama goats (does) to go but likely not until mid May. Felipe is doing great you will get to meet him as well.

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Late March on the farm

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The Share Fair was a lot of fun. Felipe stole the show and distracted potential subscribers. The kids loved him and he loved the attention. By 1:00 in the afternoon he did look exhausted and he laid down and rested. We still have openings for this season so let your friends know, now is the time to send in those applications.

We are busy getting the farm ready for opening day. There is so much to do in between rain storms. Planting outside has been suspended until it drys out again. We managed to get a few beds of flowers and some kale and chard in the ground before the deluge. We hope to get a dry spell to seed beets, carrots and plant squash under cover this up coming week.

Jacob helped me transplant all the tomatoes. We have about 8 varieties of cherry tomatoes and over 15 of regular season tomatoes. I am hopeful that by next week we will transplant out the greenhouse tomatoes. We will have tons of starts for sale by the beginning of May and I will send out an email to subscribers with the list. The Chinese broccoli is sizing up and may even be ready for the first or second harvest. The overwintering cauliflower is getting huge, we hope it will hold.

Jacob also accompanied me to Canby for the Home Orchard Societies annual scion exchange. We picked up over 30 varieties of apples and we are busy grafting them to root stock. Who knows what we will do with all those apples, but it has been fun. I am off to transplant and seed. See you in April.

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Count down to start of 2015 season

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We are tempted to plant out in the field, but we are holding back. If we plant out there it means we will need to lay out irrigation and there is no guarantee that it won’t freeze out those seedlings. We have most of the indoor space planted, save some early potatoes that I hope to get in the ground as soon as I can get out there.

There are several events coming up that I want to shout out:

March 14th from 2-4 at Valley Arts in Forest Grove there will be a reception that I will be at featuring Polly’s and my bird feeders. I would love for any of you to show up to chat with me and see the local art created right here in Oregon.

March 21st: CSA Share Fair: Spring starts here! from  10 am to 2 pm . I will be there with “Felipe” and pictures from the farm. I hope you will come and bring some friends. I am hoping to sign-up at least 10 more shares so we will be full for the 2015 season. Please do plan on stopping by.The Redd, 831 SE Salmon St. Parking is available at the site and in the surrounding neighborhoods. HOSTS: Portland Area CSA Coalition and Ecotrust MORE INFO: www.portlandcsa.org and www.ecotrust.org/event/sharefair

April 12th 2-6: Opening potluck at La Finquita. Bring your family, a dish to pass and a pizza topping and come gather with other CSA members are we kick off the 2015 season. If you pick -up on Mondays you can gather your share then. The first Thursday pick-up is on April 16th.

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Photos from the farm this February

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This has been a glorious February. The pruning party had amazing weather and a good turn out. We got a good chunk of the pruning done and Juve managed to clear the cut branches over several chipping sessions. Thanks to all the members and friends of “La Finquita” for their help. We have been busy transplanting into the green houses.

Farming is frustrating. Juvencio re-prepared the beds in the greenhouse after the floods at the beginning of February. Many beds just washed away completely as water raged through the gopher holes and took all our soil with it. I transplanted two beds of Chinese broccoli and returned the next day to find the slugs noticed them as well. Many were half eaten in the course of several hours. A gopher tunneled in the same bed. The Dark Eyed Juncos ate all the sprouting beets and the pill bugs (rollie pollies) finished off all the emerging carrots. The sprouting broccoli and overwintering cauliflower are in full swing, 6 weeks before the season starts. The kale we hoped to overwinter and give at the start of the season next month is flowering now and will be gone by then. We work super hard to tend the soil, raise the seedlings, plant the seeds and the 10 plagues (maybe there are 20) get us every time. The plagues include pests such as slugs, rollie pollies, cucumber beetles, birds, gophers and weather. All of these things are out of our control. We can mitigate but we can not prevent all the damage and cost in wasted time, money and sweat that goes into growing vegetables.

Membership is another area of farming that I wish would take care of itself. We want our members to stay with us, many of you do. Many of you plan to remain but don’t send in your deposit, so that keeps us looking for more members. We are trying to firm up the membership for 2015. Please do send in your deposit, please do spread the word. Please tell your friends it is time to join our CSA.

I will be at the first ever:

CSA Share Fair: Spring Starts Here

Saturday, March 21, 10 – 2, Free

At the Redd, 831 SE Salmon St.

Our season opens April 12th. We will hold our annual potluck, farm orientation and tour and general fun member get together on April 12 from 2-6. Please bring your family and dish to share, plus pizza topping to the farm that afternoon. Vegetable pick-up will begin that week. Monday members can pick up from Sunday afternoon until Monday night. Thursday members can pick up anytime after 3 on Wednesdays to Thursday nights. Many more details to come as the season approaches. I am waiting for the frost to thaw to go out and finish planting all those beds Juve has prepared. We will prune, plant and weed as much as we can today. Here’s to keeping ones head held high in spite of the plagues and disappointments.

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Pruning Party set for February 21

January is almost gone and with the mild temperatures the plum trees are budding! We have scheduled the pruning party for 2/21 (Saturday).
We will start early (9:00 a.m.) and work until we finish. Dave Allie our resident arborist will be on hand to give a brief lesson before you climb into the old apple and pear trees and get to work. We have a pot luck as well and generally have a really fun day rain or shine.

Please bring any useful tools and label with your name: pruning shears, loppers, tree saw, gloves (don’t worry if you don’t have them, we will have extras available to share) and a dish to share.

We were featured on the local Portland area CSA website:

http://www.portlandcsa.org/2015/01/january-on-the-farm/

Check it out and share with your friends. We are open and accepting new members for 2015. We start the week of April 15th.

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Happy New Year 2015, farmers back from Spain

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We had a wonderful 2 and a half weeks in Spain. A much needed break from the rain, the farm and a good time spent together. We had a little snafu getting to Spain. At the airport I was unable to board as my valid passport would expire within three months of our return flight. I stayed behind and had to get an expedited passport four days after the rest of the family left. They saw Madrid, I joined them in Barcelona and we made the best of a ridiculous situation. The kids had to come back to start school and Juve and I had 9 days to travel around the south. What a great celebration of our 25 year wedding anniversary.

We have been back almost a week and are getting the farm back in order. Fortunately the weather cooperated while we were gone, no major ice or snow. The greenhouses are standing, the winter crops look fairly good. We managed to get the seedling hoop house pressure washed, a few beds tilled and barn organized. We still have a few weeks before work on the farm begins in earnest.

We are getting our rooster of members organized for 2015. Returning members still have a chance to retain their spot for 2015, but we are actively taking on new members. Please let us know if you will continue and send in your deposit of $100. New members can go to our membership page and print out the membership form and send in their deposits as well. More news soon, Pruning party coming soon, February!

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