Week #16 and #17 and #18

Week #16 and 17
• Tomatoes
• Cucumbers
• Zucchini
• green beans
• onions
• Garlic
• Cabbage
• Potatoes
• Lettuce
• Dill or cilantro or parsley
• Basil
• Green onions
• Currants
• Apples
The spring broccoli has finished and Juvencio worked really hard to remove old plants and prepare the beds for the next crop. I managed to get the week’s lettuce planted, some additional pole beans, more basil and the first radicchio planted. We have some of the fall crops in as well like cauliflower and cabbage, but much of it is waiting for space. Last year at this time we had harvested all the onions. That will have to wait until we get back from vacation as the greens are still juicy and the bulbs are not drying down yet.
We are trying to tie up loose ends, get the crops planted that need it the most and harvest those that need to come out prior to our departure. Many things are not cooperating! They have their own time and can not be rushed. We will count on Dee to run the harvest crew and Cata and Vincent to keep the farm and animals from falling into ruin. We are looking forward to a nice visit with Juvencio’s family and to a few days of relaxation. I must admit that vacation usually entails a lot of preparation and a lot of heartache when we get back (about the weeding we missed, the vegetables that did or didn’t get harvested and the flowers that went to waste.) A small price to pay to spend time with family and friends in far off lands.
Please do remember to come and help if you signed up for harvest help in the next two weeks. Dee will need an extra hand. Remember to sign up for the canning party on September 17th. Please do email me with questions. The harvest festival is October 15th, mark your calendars for a great party.
We will have pork and beef for sale in the near future. Please communicate with us via email or call Juvencio to place your order. The beef is all pasture raised. This is open to non-members as well.

Tomato Bisque
Use fresh tomatoes to make a luscious creamy tomato soup. It is quite easy to make and much more tasty than canned cream of tomato soup. If you are lucky enough to grow your own tomatoes or have a good farmer’s market nearby, you can easily freeze tomatoes without the fuss of canning, and they will also taste fresher than canned. Simply wash, pat dry, place whole tomatoes in a freezer zip-top bag, suck out the air with a straw, seal, and freeze. When you thaw them, the skins will slip right off, and they are ready to go.
Ingredients:
• 3 Tablespoons butter
• 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
• 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
• 2 cups water
• 4 pounds tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and cut into pieces
• 2 Tablespoons light brown sugar
• 6 whole cloves
• 1 teaspoon salt
• Freshly ground black pepper
• 1 cup medium or whipping cream
Preparation:
Melt the butter in a large saucepan. Add the onion and toss to coat. Stir over medium heat until the onion is tender. Sprinkle on the flour and continue stirring over medium heat until the mixture foams. Stir in the water and bring to a boil.

Measure out 3/4 cup of the tomato3 pieces and set aside. Add the remaining tomato pieces to the boiling mixture. Stir in the brown sugar and cloves. Reduce the heat and cook, uncovered, at the gentle bubble for 30 minutes.

Transfer to a food mill and force through. Return to the saucepan and stir in the reserved tomato pieces. Blend in the salt, pepper, and cream. Place soup4 over medium heat and warm gently, but do not boil.

Yield: 6 servings

Paleo Zucchini Bread (tested and approved by Sue Kass)
Preheat oven to 400. Prepare 1 dozen muffin tins or oil and line w/parchment standard loaf pan.

Blend until smooth:
1 c almond butter
2 Tbs cocoa powder
3 Tbs maple syrup
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
Add in
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
Mix well, then fold in
1 c. Shredded zucchini, excess moisture squeezed out.

Muffins take about 15-20 minutes, loaf 30-40.

Doubles, freezes well.

Basil Soup 6-8 servings
1 ½ cup scallions Sauté in ¼ cup butter
2 cloves garlic
Add 6 cups of stock, 1 ½ cups peeled, seeded tomatoes
Add ½ cup rice and cook until tender. Stir in 5 cups chopped fresh basil

North African Zucchini “Compote” Aljuk

1 lb zucchini, thickly sliced
1 large russet potato (1/2 lb) peeled and diced
2 Tbs lemon juice
2 Tbs olive oil
1-2 garlic cloves, mashed
1 tsp freshly ground caraway seed
3/4 tsp freshly ground coriander seed
1/2 tsp Harissa

Steam the veggies until very soft, then mash and blend in the
remaining ingredients. Use as a spread for pita or flatbread

Cucumber Salsa Salad
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN
This salad, which resembles gazpacho, is a lovely, light way to begin a Mexican meal. Serve it atop lettuce leaves as a salad, or serve over rice. Alternately, use it as a sauce with fish, chicken or fajitas.
1 long European cucumber, very finely diced
Salt to taste
1 small red onion, finely minced
5 medium-size ripe tomatoes, finely chopped
2 jalapeño or serrano peppers, seeded if desired and finely chopped
1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped cilantro (to taste), plus several sprigs for garnish
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Leaf lettuce or Boston lettuce for serving (optional)
1 avocado, sliced, for garnish
1. Place the finely diced cucumber in a colander, and sprinkle with salt. Toss and allow to sit for 15 minutes. Rinse the cucumber thoroughly with cold water, and drain again on paper towels.
2. Meanwhile, place the onion in a bowl and cover with cold water. Let sit for five minutes, then drain, rinse with cold water and drain on paper towels.
3. Combine the tomatoes, chiles, cilantro, vinegar, lime juice and olive oil in a bowl. Add the cucumber and onion, and season to taste with salt. Taste and adjust seasoning.
4. Serve the salad on lettuce leaves, garnished with slices of avocado and cilantro sprigs, or spoon over steamed rice.
Yield: Serves six.
Advance preparation: You can assemble the salad a few hours ahead, but don’t add the cilantro until close to serving time.

DILLED TUNA-CUCUMBER SALAD
1 6 1/8-ounce can water-packed white tuna, drained
1/2 cucumber, peeled, seeded, diced
2 small green onions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons nonfat yogurt
2 tablespoons reduced-calorie mayonnaise
1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Combine all ingredients in small bowl. Mix well. Season generously with pepper. Serve salad chilled.

Basil Pesto
Basil leaves (removed from tough stems, washed and dried gently)
Gallic cloves minced
Pine nuts
Olive oil
Parmesan cheese

This recipe doesn’t have exact measures but I usually start with the cheese in the food processor and grind it fine. Then I remove it and all basil leaves and garlic to the bowl. Grind fine then add 1-4 tablespoons of pine nuts and then while motor is running add a stream of olive oil and the parmesan. I like the consistency to be pasty not too dry. I then add this to 1 pound of cooked pasta al dente. Mix well and serve with additional cheese on top.
Blistered Padron peppers
Ingredients
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 1 pound Padrón or shishito peppers
• Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)
Preparation
1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add half of the peppers; cook, tossing occasionally, until skins are blistered and flesh is softened, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl, sprinkle with salt, and toss to coat. Repeat with remaining peppers, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and more salt.
2.

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Week #15 2017

Week #15
• Tomatoes!!! First of the season, we pick them slightly under ripe so that they will last for you this week (they may not make it home as you’ll want to pop them in your mouth as you drive home)
• Currants – slightly tart and bright red, these delicious berries make good jelly or an addition to a fruit salad or tart.
• Lettuce
• Sweet onion – these are fresh not cured so they are not meant to hang around for weeks, but rather be used this week
• Cauliflower – she’s back! for each and that is it until the fall!
• Cilantro, dill or parsley
• Green peppers
• Basil – it’s time to make pesto
• Kale or chard (gotta eat those greens)
• Beans
• Cabbage – some are huge, make salad, roast them or make kraut
• Cucumbers
• Summer squash, aka zucchini
• Garlic
• Green onions
We keep working away. Weeding, seeding, transplanting, trellising and harvesting. The weeds periodically look like they will win, but then we get the better hand. The onions are almost ready for harvest, likely they will be at their peak when we are off in Honduras. That being said, one more weeding and they will really size up. So, if you want to lend a hand and love weeding let us know and we can direct you to the “save our onions” project.
You will notice form the list, we are moving away from brassicas and into the night shades, peppers, tomatoes and eggplant soon to come. We will have an amazing second crop of potatoes coming soon. Sebastian, Arlene and Jasmin helped me plant a late fall crop of potatoes in the greenhouse #2 on Thursday night. They also seeded beets! It was a fun way to finish out the day getting ahead for fall.
Please do sign up to help harvest. We seem to have quite a good crew some weeks and sometimes those who sign up don’t show up ☹. Please do set your alarm or mark us on your calendar as part of what makes this crazy farm work is a few extra hands on harvest days. There are three harvests while we are gone and we need you to help us , many have volunteered, but that Wednesday harvest needs a few of you to step up.
The canning party is set for September 17, sign up in the barn! Many more details to come closer to the event, like what to bring what it costs etc. Just put it on your calendar! The harvest festival is also on the calendar for October 15th.
Running now to harvest for the Sunday/Monday group, should be a nice harvest.
BACHELOR’S JAM
In a large, nonporous, nonreactive crock or jar with a lid, layer chosen fruit with sugar and spirit. For each pound of fruit, add 1 cup fine white sugar. Add spirit to cover by an inch or so, beginning with 6 to 8 cups, and making certain all fruit is submerged with each successive layer. If necessary, you can weight the top layer with a plate. Do not stir as you build the layers. When mixture nears the top of the crock, cover securely and place in a cool, dark spot for six weeks minimum, and preferably several months. When ready to serve, stir together gently once.
An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated the amount of sugar needed for every pound of fruit. It is a cup of sugar per pound, not a pound of sugar per pound of fruit.

Massaged Kale Salad with Apples and Gorgonzola
Bastyr adjunct faculty member Jennifer Adler M.S., C.N. contributed this recipe. I love to watch Jennifer work with food because she loves to use her hands. She touches and loves food into magnificent flavor and tenderness. Jennifer likes to make a bunch of this salad at once to ensure that she have dark leafy greens ready when busy days are ahead. It tastes better as the days go by.

1 LARGE bunch kale
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/3 cup sunflower seeds, toasted (or Sweet Glazed Nuts)
¼ cup diced red onion
1/3 cup currants
¾ cup diced apple, (½ apple)
¼ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons unfiltered apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup gorgonzola cheese, crumbled
1. Be sure to choose a large bunch of kale (or two small ones) or the salad will be overly salty and over-dressed. By large, I mean 16-20 leaves that are at least 12″ long.
2. De-stem kale by pulling leaf away from the stem. Wash leaves. Spin or pat dry.
3. Stack leaves, rollup and cut into thin ribbons (chiffonade).
4. Put kale in a large mixing bowl. Add salt, massage salt into kale with your hands for 2 whole minutes. The volume of the kale should reduce by about 1/3.
5. To toast seeds, put in a dry skillet over low to medium heat and stir constantly for a few minutes until they change color and give off a nutty aroma.
6. Put kale in a fresh bowl and discard any leftover liquid.
7. Stir onion, currants, apple and toasted seeds into kale.
8. Dress with oil and vinegar and toss. Taste for salt and vinegar, adding more if necessary. When at desired flavor, toss in cheese.

Preparation time 15 minutes
Makes 6 servings
Maryanne’s Tian of Basil
• 2 medium- small zucchini, thinly sliced
• 4 bunches basil, 4 cups loosely packed fresh basil, stemmed and coarsely chopped
• 3-4 ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced
• ¾ cup or less shredded kasseri, gruyere or Swiss cheese,
• ¼ cup or less fruity extra virgin olive oil
• Salt and pepper to taste.
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Oil a shallow (about 2 inches deep) ovenproof serving dish. Place the zucchini slices over the bottom and press chopped basil leaves firmly over the zucchini (the basil will cook down the way spinach does).
2. Arrange the tomato slices over the basil. Then scatter the cheese evenly over the tomatoes, drizzle with olive oil and back about 35 minutes, until hot through and cheeses are melted

Cranberry-Cream Scones (use currants instead!)
From The San Francisco Chronicle Cookbook

2 C all purpose flour, plus flour for dusting
1/3 C sugar
3 tsps baking powder
¼ tsp salt
½ C fresh cranberries (use currants instead)
1 1/3 C whipping cream
1 Tble butter, melted
1 Tble powdered sugar

Position the rack in the lower third of the oven; preheat to
375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
Sift together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt into a
large bowl. Mix the cranberries into the flour mixture. Whip the cream
in a bowl until soft peaks form.
Fold the whipped cream into the dry ingredients just until it
forms a rough semicohesive mass. (It’s OK that some parts are moister
than others.)
Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead
only a few times until the dough holds together. Lightly flour your
hands and pat the dough into an 8-inch circle; place on the baking
sheet. Brush the surface with the butter and sprinkle with the
powdered sugar.
Cut the circle into 10 wedges without detaching them.
Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until golden brown. Cut into the
premarked wedges. Serve hot or at room temperature. Yields 10 scones.

Luna’s chocolate Zucchini Cake

½ c soft butter 1 c sugar (can be cut down) 2 ½ c flour
½ c cooking oil 1 tsp. Vanilla 1 tsp soda
2 eggs ½ c sour milk (buttermilk) ½ t salt
½ c chocolate chips 4 T cocoa ½ tsp. Cinnamon
2 c grated zucchini

Mix butter,oil, eggs, sugar, vanilla and milk together. Add cocoa, soda, cinnamon and salt and mix well. Add flour, mix well, add zucchini, chocolate chips. Mix well. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. 13 X 9 inch pan or 2 loaf pans.

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Week #14, 2017

Week #14, 2017
• Lettuce – huge heads of “concept” and “red sails”
• Green onions
• Garlic
• Beets or carrots
• Cucumbers
• Zucchini
• Basil
• Cilantro or dill or parsley
• Cabbage (make sure to try the roasted cabbage recipe it is delicious!)
• Broccoli or cauliflower
• Beans or peas (still trickling in)
• Chard or kale

Never a dull moment on the farm. Juvencio and I are trying to stay ahead of the on slot of weeds. The weeks seem to grow 3 – 5 inches a day and are setting seeds!! Vincent has done a super job on the onions (weeding them twice) and now they are due again! The onions are really beginning to bulb and are looking good. We had hoped to harvest them before taking off to Honduras, but that seems unlikely now. We will send out the word if we can get them out of the ground prior to departure and call on all hands on deck.
We harvested the first few tomatoes this week, just enough for us to taste, but they are coming to your share soon. By the end of the month we should have both cherry and standard size tomatoes ready for you to taste. The peppers are also in bloom and setting fruit. It is such an exciting time of year as we shift into summer and fall, broccoli will end for a while and night shades (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and potatoes )will rule the roost. As we pull out the old broccoli we will transplant the fall brassicas (cabbage, kale, broccoli, cauliflower) and the overwintering varieties. We carefully plan crop rotations so as to give the plants the nutrients they need and ensure the pests don’t get the better of us.
At this time of year the share may seem too large for your family so we suggest you peek at our recipe files and remember to; eat salad every day, roast your cabbage or make slaw, try our favorite zucchini dish, and eat a cucumber a day to keep the doctor away!
We should have tomatoes and red currants next week and possibly some early apples and fresh onions. We appreciate our subscribers helping with the harvest at least twice over the season. Your help makes our work easier and gets you more veggies.
I have officially placed the canning party on the calendar. This is an annual event, open to subscribers that is a ton of work but a lot of fun. Mary Kay, a long time member and chef has generously given of her time for years to help me pull this event off. She and I choose the recipes based on excess farm produce, and what has been successful in the past and participants help prepare the recipes. We typically prepare about 13 recipes over the course of the day. Participants work on that one recipe with other members and take that recipe from start to finish (canned product). Every participant family gets at least one of each canned item, usually it is about 20 jars of canned produce to take home for their own pantry. It is an all day event , but totally worth it. For more details and photos go to : on our website. Sign up early as space is limited to 20. I will send out a detailed list of what to bring as the time approaches. As we begin gathering suggestions for recipes, please do share your favorites with me so I can consider adding them this year.
My note would not be complete if I did not recap some of the political news of the week. Many successes at the state level. Cover all kids passed- all children will be covered by health insurance no matter where they were born. Reproductive rights also passed, where insurers must cover all types of birth control and reproductive services. A huge transportation bill also passed, which has many compromises but something for every corner of the state. Many other important issues also got covered as our state legislature closed out the 2017 session. On a national level we are still in the fight of a life
time to save Affordable Care Act (ACA/Obamacare). Please do stay engaged as failure to safeguard affordable healthcare will mean that 22 million people go uninsured. Join my activism group and get weekly updates. Just send me an email to: lynjuve@msn.com

Time to stop yapping and get working.
Some recipes to enjoy this week

Zucchini Trifolati
Sautéed Zucchini

The secret to this fabulous cooking technique is the long slow cooking which infuses all the flavors. Vegetables cooked this way make great pasta sauce or you can serve them as crostini. Try mushrooms with garlic and mint.

2 pounds Zucchini
4 cloves of garlic, sliced
chili pepper (or herbs)
Salt

Cover the bottom of a large sauté pan with olive oil. Add the sliced garlic and chile peppers to the pan; NOW turn on the heat. Slice the zucchini into thin slices and add to the golden garlic, salt and cover the pan. The salt will bring out the liquid in the zucchini and they will stew in their own juices and infuse with the garlic. Let them over cook. It is a pleasant surprise.

ZUCCHINI CARPACCIO
4 small zucchini (1 lb total)
1/3 cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/4 cup pine nuts (1 oz) 1 (6-oz) piece Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano
Garnish: thinly sliced tips of 2 zucchini blossoms*; 4 fresh mint sprigs
Special equipment: a Japanese Benriner** or other adjustable-blade slicer
Cut zucchini diagonally into paper-thin slices with slicer. Arrange slices, overlapping slightly, in 1 layer on 4 plates.
Make stacks of mint leaves and cut crosswise into very thin slivers, then sprinkle over zucchini.
Whisk together oil and lemon juice in a small bowl, then drizzle over zucchini. Sprinkle with sea salt, pepper to taste, and pine nuts. Let stand 10 minutes to soften zucchini and allow flavors to develop.
Just before serving, use a vegetable peeler to shave cheese to taste over zucchini, then sprinkle with zucchini blossoms and mint.
*Available at specialty produce markets and some supermarkets.
**Available at Asian markets, some cookware shops, and Uwajimaya (800-899-1928).
Gourmet
March 2003

Sesame Cabbage
1/2 cup raw sesame seeds
1/4 tsp salt
1 dried red chili
1 head Cabbage, chopped
3/4 cup water
1 tsp salt
“Popu”
1 1/2 tbsp oil (olive, sesame, canola, etc.)
1 dried red chili, cracked
1 pinch fenugreek
1/4 tsp mustard seed
1 tsp cumin seed
Dry roast sesame seeds and dried red chili in a pan over medium heat. Stir often until majority seeds are brown. Remove from heat and cool. Once cool, grind in a food processor or blender with 1/2 tsp of salt. Excess ground sesame can be stored in the refrigerator for further use. To cook cabbage over medium heat, add chopped cabbage to 3/4 cup boiling water + 1 tsp salt. Cook until cabbage is desired texture. Once cooked, drain excess liquid. Add 1/4-1/2 cup ground sesame. Turn off heat.Prepare the “popu” in a separate pan by combing all ingredients, heating over medium heat, and waiting for mustard seeds to crackle. Once ready, add to cabbage, stir and heat over low heat for 1 minute. The “popu” can be prepared when the cabbage is nearly finished.
Cabbage and Potato Pancakes (from Simplicity – from a Monastery Kitchen)
1/2 head small green cabbage
4 large potatoes, peeled and grated
1 medium sized onion, finely chopped
2 eggs
3/4 c milk
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
a small bunch of parsley, chopped
8 TBS vegetable or olive oil
1. Quarter the cabbage and steam it for about 6-7 minutes. Drain and chop the cabbage finely.
2. Place chopped cabbage, grated potatoes, and chopped onion in a big bowl. Mash them thoroughly with a masher and mix them well with a spatula.
3. In a separate deep bowl beat the eggs. Add the milk and beat some more. Add the cabbage-potato-onion mixture. Add some salt and pepper and the chopped parsley. Mix all the ingredients together until thoroughly blended. Refrigerate 1 hour.
4. Preheat oven to 250. To make the pancakes use a crepe pan or nonstick skillet. In the pan heat about 1 tablespoon of oil (each time) to low-med and pour in about one eighth of the potato mixture. Flatten the mixture evenly with a spatula and cook over medium heat until the pancake turns brown at the bottom. Turn the pancake over carefully and continue cooking the other side. When the pancake is done, slide it carefully onto an ovenproof platter. Repeat the process until all the pancakes are done. Keep the pancakes in the warm oven until ready to serve.
ANDY’S FAVORITE CABBAGE
Sliced green cabbage
sliced onion (red, green or white)
olive oil
salt
pepper
white wine
Sauté the onion and cabbage in oil, then add wine, salt and pepper. This is a magnificent
Creamy Dill Sauce
Farmer John’s Cookbook

Great on egg salad, or tossed with cucumbers, or as a sauce for fish or crab cakes.
Serves about ¾ cup

½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar or sherry wine vinegar
½ teaspoon minced shallots
¼ teaspoon Dijon mustard
Pinch of salt plus more to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 egg yolk
¼ cup sour cream
3 tablespoons minced fresh dill
Lemon juice

1. Combine the oil, vinegar, shallot, mustard, pinch of salt, and pepper to taste in a large jar. Cover tightly and shake the jar vigorously until the oil and vinegar have thickened.
2. Beat the egg yolk with the sour cream in a separate bowl until well combined.
3. If you’re using a food processor: Process the yolk and sour cream for 30 seconds and then add the vinaigrette in a very thin stream in about three additions, letting the sauce thicken before each addition. If you’re making the dressing by hand: Using a good whisk, beat the yolk and sour cream, then add the vinaigrette and scant tablespoon at a time, whisking thoroughly after each addition, until the vinaigrette is fully combined with the egg yolk and sour cream.
4. Once you’ve incorporated the last of the vinaigrette and the sauce is very thick thin it with either the lemon juice (1 or 2 teaspoons) or by vigorously stirring in 1 tablespoon of water.
5. Stir in the dill and add salt and pepper to taste.

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Photos from July 2 harvest

Thank you Erin for the amazing photos of the harvest yesterday. We had an amazing crew of families helping to harvest, tie up tomatoes, weed onions and pound T posts. What a great in prompt to work party. Thank you to all those that lent a hand!

Cincopa WordPress plugin

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Week #13 2017

Week #13
• Lettuce
• Potatoes
• Parsley, basil, dill or cilantro (choose two)
• Broccoli
• Cabbage
• Zucchini
• Cucumbers
• Beans or peas
• Kale or chard
• Green onions
• Garlic

Life on the farm is hectic. Weeding is a battle that for the time seems to be farmers ahead. Juvencio weeded all 13-14 winter squash beds just in the nick of time. The plants grew to amazing heights with the row cover over them, but so did the thistle. Hopefully these warm days will help the squash overshadow the Thistle and keep it at bay. Vincent has been essential as well as he uses his Kenyan hoeing technique to hill the plants and pull the weeds in one fell swoop.

We managed to plant many of the Brussels sprouts in the beds that held the garlic. We are moving the greenhouse production into fall production and seeding crops that will fill those spaces into the winter. It is hard to believe in the second week of summer that we have to plan and plant for winter, but such is the life of the farmer. The zucchini have gone crazy as is typical for this time of year, so I have added many of our family favorite zucchini recipes below. Sue Kass made the fritters and they were really good so she sent along this recipe.

Juvencio reminds me often not to mix politics with business, but alas I find that impossible to do. These are not ordinary times and should never be viewed as such. Health care for 22 million people is at stake, frankly health care for all is at stake as the proposed Senate bill will raise premiums for most people. Please consider joining me on July 6th at 911 NE 11th Avenue* Portland, OR 97232 (10:30 – 12:30) for a rally with our Senators. Please keep writing and calling our representatives, they are listening and they are counting on us to help guide them on the issues we find most important, there are so many. If you want to receive my dedicated political emails please send me an email and I will add you to the Activism Group – United Unidos. As we gather with family and friends for the fourth of July, find a way to make your voice heard.

Important dates:
July 30- August 7 – Farmers vacation – will need helpers for the harvests July 30, August 2 and August 6
September 16 or 17 – Canning Party – mark your calendars
October 15 – Harvest Festival

Zucchini Fritters
Adapted a bit from Simply recipes
Yield: about 10 12 2 ½ inch fritters
1 # (about 2 medium) zucchini
1 teaspoon coarse salt (kosher salt)
2 scallions, split lengthwise and sliced thin
1 large egg, lightly beaten
Freshly ground black pepper
½ cup all purpose flour (or gluten free four mix) ½ teaspoon baking powder
Olive or another oil of your choice, for frying
1-2 teaspoons of chopped basil or chopped mint.
To serve (optional)
1 cup sour cream or plain, full fat yogurt
1-2 tablespoons lemon juice
½ teaspoon lemon zest
Pinch of salt
1 small minced or crushed clove of garlic

Preheat oven to 200 degrees. Have a baking sheet ready.

Grate zucchini, in a large bowl, toss zucchini with 1 teaspoon coarse salt and set aside for 10 minutes. Wring out the zucchini in a piece of cheese cloth.
Return the deflated mass of zucchini shreds to bowl It may need ¼ more teaspoon of salt. Stir in scallions, egg, and some ground pepper .In a tiny dish stir together flour and baking powder, then stir the mixture into the zucchini batter.
Fry the fritters in the heated oil for about 4 minutes on each side.
Serve with topping, can keep warm in the oven on the baking sheet.
Zucchini Lasagna

3 cups marinara sauce (Paul Newmans is good if you don’t want to make your own)
1 small can tomato paste
3-4 zucchini sliced thin the long way
1 lb. ricotta cheese
1 lb. shredded mozzarella cheese
Optional – 2 cups onions and /or mushrooms, 2 tsp basil, 2 tsp oregano, 1 clove garlic

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Spray a 9 X 13 pan with oil
Stir the tomato paste into the marinara sauce to thicken it
Put about 1 cup of the thickened sauce on the bottom of the pan
Put a layer of zucchini strips, overlapping a little
Dot zucchini with dollops of ricotta, evenly distributed, use about 1/2 of the ricotta
Layer 1/2 of the mozzarella over that
Layer other veggies, etc., if you use them
Another layer of zucchini
Another layer of ricotta
Pour rest of sauce over
Other half of mozzarella goes on top
Bake 1 hour
Cool 10-15 min.

Paleo Zucchini Bread (tested and approved by Sue Kass)
Preheat oven to 400. Prepare 1 dozen muffin tins or oil and line w/parchment standard loaf pan.

Blend until smooth:
1 c almond butter
2 Tbs cocoa powder
3 Tbs maple syrup
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
Add in
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
Mix well, then fold in
1 c. Shredded zucchini, excess moisture squeezed out.

Muffins take about 15-20 minutes, loaf 30-40.

Doubles, freezes well.

Luna’s chocolate Zucchini Cake

½ c soft butter 1 c sugar (can be cut down) 2 ½ c flour
½ c cooking oil 1 tsp. Vanilla 1 tsp soda
2 eggs ½ c sour milk (buttermilk) ½ t salt
½ c chocolate chips 4 T cocoa ½ tsp. Cinnamon
2 c grated zucchini ¼ c chopped nuts

Mix butter,oil, eggs, sugar, vanilla and milk together. Add cocoa, soda, cinnamon and salt and mix well. Add flour, mix well, add zucchini, chocolate chips and nuts. Mix well. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. 13 X 9 inch pan or 2 loaf pans. (Lyn’s note: I always double the recipe it is gobbled up as soon as it comes out of the oven.)

Easy Zucchini Soufflé By Dave Holt (habanero_holt at yahoo.com)
Sauté:
2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
5 zucchinis, 6-8″ in length, sliced ¼” width
3 cloves garlic, pressed 5 scallions, diced
Soufflé:
6 eggs, size large
¾ cup sour cream
½ cup grated mozzarella cheese
½ cup grated monterey jack cheese
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
½ teaspoon cardamom
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
Prepare a 9×9 ceramic or glass baking disk with a light coating of extra virgin olive oil.
Soufflé Preparation:
Beat eggs and sour cream with a medium sized whisk until thoroughly mixed (This aerates the soufflé and allows us to skip the step of separating whites & yolks – thereby making this an “easy” soufflé). Add cheeses and seasonings and mix well with whisk. Add processed sauté mixture and mix well with whisk. Pour soufflé mixture into baking dish and place in oven, center rack. Bake for one hour at 325 degrees, or for forty minutes using a convection oven (soufflé is done when middle of soufflé has risen to same height as the periphery). Let cool for 10 minutes to set up before cutting and serving.
Serving Suggestions:
Serve with a dollop of sour cream on top of each serving.

Roasted Cabbage (Our families new favorite way to eat cabbage 2014)
1 head cabbage
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Parmesan cheese
Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut the cabbage in half and now cut into wedges 3- 4 per half leaving a bit of the core on each wedge. Arrange the wedges on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with olive oil, salt and pepper and now turn over and do the same. On the second side sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Put the cabbage in the oven for 20 – 30 minutes, it should be golden brown and crispy on the outer leaves. Remove from the oven and enjoy! We will never let another cabbage head go to waste.
GREEN CABBAGE STUFFED WITH VEGETABLES AND FRESH HERBS
Printed from COOKS.COM

1 c. chopped mushrooms
2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1/2 c. diced red bell peppers
1/2 c. diced asparagus or broccoli
1/4 c. diced onions
6 tbsp. Pesto
Dash of freshly ground black pepper
1/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
1 c. chopped cooked red potatoes
1 c. cooked lima or fava beans
1/2 c. pine nuts
1/2 head or 10 green cabbage leaves, steamed 3 to 4 minutes
2 c. prepared tomato sauce
3/4 to 1 c. grated Mozzarella cheese (optional)
In a large saucepan, saute the mushrooms, parsley, peppers, asparagus, onions, Pesto, and pepper in the oil over medium heat for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and stir in the potatoes, beans, and pine nuts. Place 1 or 2 tablespoons of the mixture on each cabbage leaf where the thick stem is. Fold the right side of the leaf over it, then the left, and roll up.
Place the stuffed leaves in a greased baking dish and pour the tomato sauce over them. Top with the cheese, cover with aluminum foil, and bake in a preheated 375 degree oven for 30 to 40 minutes. Yield: 2 servings.

Kale and Lentil Soup
(Marilyn’s invention from Sue)
3 T EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)
1 onion and 1 rib of celery (chopped and sauté for 4 minutes)
6-7 cups of water
2 cups chicken broth
1 ½ cups green lentils (rinsed and checked)
1 bay leaf
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
½ – 1 # kale (washed and sliced)
12 oz. Kielbasa (slice in 1” rounds)
16 oz. plum tomatoes
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste
Sauté onion and celery for 4 minutes. Add water and chicken broth as well as lentils to the sauté mix. Add the bay leaf and red pepper flakes and bring to a boil. Decrease heat to a simmer for 30 minutes. Then add the Kale, kielbasa sausage, tomatoes and red wine vinegar. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 15 minutes more and serve. Great the next day.

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Week #11 2017

Week # 11, 2017
• Lettuce
• Parsley, dill or basil
• Kohlrabi
• Turnips or radishes
• Chinese broccoli or standard broccoli or spinach or chard
• Beets and their greens
• Small red onions or garlic
• Kale
• Zucchini or sugar snap peas
• Fennel

Happy Fathers day to all the fathers out there. We celebrated last night as the last night before Diego headed off on his travels. This week has raced by. Juvencio and Vincent did a stellar job at weeding and have the place looking much better. Of course with the rain over the last few days the next generation of weeds is already up and making progress. I have been inspired by my seed catalog to invest in some new weeding tools, maybe that will help?

This morning at 0500 we drove Diego to the airport. He is off to see 4 Asian countries in 4 weeks with his best friend Mohsen and his family. He will have a super time and get a small glimpse of many cultures. We look forward to seeing and hearing about all of his adventures. The trip started with a splash as they found out 12 hours before departure that the first leg of their trip from Portland to Seattle was cancelled. Sadaf (Mohsen’s sister) spent hours scrambling to get the family a change in flights to enable them to get to Seattle in time to depart at 1400 for Malaysia .

Jacob is enjoying Homer, Alaska. He spent the week at the mouth the bay surveying water tributaries. He saw over 10 bears and much more wildlife while enjoying being out in the wilderness. He was in a group of 5 with bear spray, luckily that was enough to keep them at a distance. We look forward to a family reunion in Honduras.

It is time for us to harvest the garlic. We will miss our boys that have helped with this task for years. We thought initially the garlic would hang out longer in the field but the wet weather sped the spread of rust like wildfire and most of the green part is dead. Juvencio and I will work today to get it up and out of the ground. He will prepare the beds for the Brussels sprouts and fall cabbage that is ready to take its place. As fast as we take out one crop we are planting the next. I plant lettuce every week and many other crops that keep a continuous flow of veggies coming. Later today I will seed the fall fennel, more beans, lettuce and some extra fall broccoli. The overwintering cauliflower and purple sprouting broccoli will be seeded later this week. Never a dull moment at the farm.

We look forward to the arrival of cucumbers , beans and tomatoes. They should be in full swing by early July. The zucchini is just getting going and hopefully will be a bumper crop. It is time to unveil the winter squash. It has spent almost three weeks under row cover and now that will be lifted. The cover helped bring them heat and keep the infamous cucumber beetles from demolishing them as they set their roots in the ground. I looked under the cover and saw small squash forming so it is time to let the pollinators do their job.
I will distract myself today with farm work. So much to get done. Luckily Juvencio, Luna, Mikaela and the Crabtree family did most of the harvest yesterday so it should be all ready for pick up early today.

Creamy Radish Green Soup

Makes 2 servings

2 T butter
2 – 3 cloves garlic, minced
2 green inions, trimmed and sliced ½ inch thick
1 heaping teaspoon, minced fresh ginger
1 bunch radish greens, chopped small (trim ends but use the rest of the stem)
1 medium yam or sweet potato, peeled and sliced ½ inch thick
2 cups veggie broth
¼ cup half and half
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Heat the butter in deep pan over medium heat. Add garlic, green onions and ginger and sauté for 2 minutes. Add radish greens and yam and stir to combine. Add broth and simmer covered for 10 to 15 minutes. Remover g=from heat and let sit for 5 minutes. Put soup in a blender and process for at least 30 seconds to make sure all the stems are pureed (otherwise the soup may be stringy). Return to pan, add half and half and salt and pepper to taste. Stir to combine and serve.
FENNEL VINAIGRETTE DRESSING
1/2 cup
1/2 cup
1/4 cup
1 clove
pinch
pinch olive oil
green leaf fennel leaves
lemon juice
garlic, peeled
salt
sugar
In a small saucepan, heat oil, fennel leaves, lemon juice, crushed garlic and salt and sugar. Simmer over low heat for 5 minutes.
Ellen Ecker Ogden, From: The Cook’s Garden catalog

Roasted Turnips and their greens
Ingredients
1. 1/4 cup pitted kalamata olives
2. 1 navel orange, plus 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
3. 2 pounds young turnips and their greens—turnips halved, greens stemmed and chopped
4. 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
5. 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
6. 1 garlic clove, minced
7. 1/2 cup water
8. Salt and freshly ground pepper
9. 2 ounces baby spinach (2 cups)
10. 2 tablespoons chopped hazelnuts
Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 400°. In a mini food processor, puree the olives; transfer to a bowl. Using a sharp knife, peel the orange, removing all of the bitter white pith. Working over another bowl, cut in between the membranes to release the sections.
2. On a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle the turnips with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, until almost tender.
3. Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the water and turnip greens, cover and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the greens are just tender, 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Pour the orange juice over the turnips. Roast for 5 minutes longer, until the turnips are tender and glazed; season with salt.
5. Add the spinach to the greens; toss until wilted. Drizzle the pureed olives onto a platter. Top with the turnips, greens, orange sections and hazelnuts. Serve hot or warm.


Chicken Salad with Fennel, Almonds, and lemon Mayo

Ingredients
¼ cup mayonnaise
~ Juice of 1 small lemon
2 cups cooked chicken (grilled, roasted, or poached), cut or torn into bite-size pieces
½ cup fennel bulb and fronds (not stalks), diced
1 medium shallot, diced
¾ cup almonds, toasted and sliced
~ Salt and pepper to taste
~ Mixed salad greens, washed and dried
Steps
1. Put the mayonnaise in a medium bowl, then whisk in the lemon juice to taste (I like it lemony, so I err on the side of more rather than less lemon juice). Stir in the chicken, fennel, shallot, and almonds, then season to taste with salt and fresh ground pepper
2. Toast 1 slice per sandwich of artisanal-style whole-wheat bread. Top toasted bread slices with chicken salad and mixed greens.

Fennel, Orange & Caper Salad
Note from Julia: I made this and it’s REALLY good. It’s pictured above. In the photo, I used kalamata olives instead of the capers.
2 bulbs fennel
1 Tablespoon cabers, drained
1 Tablespoon dill or chervil, fresh, chopped
Dressing
1/2 orange, seeded
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons sugar (I often omit this)
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 Tablespoons olive oil

Trim the stalks from the fennel, cut the bulb in half lengthwise; then cut crosswise into very thin slices. Place in a large bowl with the capers and the dill.. Make the dressing. Cut the quarter orange in small pieces and place in the work bowl of a food processor with the vinegar, mustard, and sugar and salt. .Process until smooth. With the motor running slowly, pour in the olive oil. Pour over the fennel, toss well and serve

Middle Eastern Radish and Beet salad in Scallion Vinaigrette

Fresh From The Garden, Perla Meyers

3 tablespoons olive oil
2 T red wine vinegar
4 T finely minced scallions
1 ½ cup plain yogurt
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 ½ pounds cooked beets, peeled and cut into ¼ inch cubes
2 ½ cups thinly sliced radishes

1. In a large serving bowl, combine the oil, vinegar, scallions and yogurt. Season with salt and pepper and whisk until blended. Add the beets and radishes and fold gently. Cover and refrigerate over night.
2. The next day, bring the salad back to room temperature. Correct seasoning and serve as an accompaniment to grilled salmon or chicken or sautéed veal.

Zucchini bread with Quinoa
• ½ cup cooked quinoa
• 1 cup blanched almond flour
• 1½ teaspoons baking soda
• ½ teaspoon sea salt
• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• pinch of nutmeg
• 3 eggs
• 3 Tablespoons raw honey, melted
• 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1 banana, mashed
• 1 Tablespoon coconut oil, melted
• 1 cup zucchini, shredded and drained
• ¼ cup lily’s mini chocolate chips (stevia-sweetened)
Instructions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and generously grease a mini muffin tin with coconut oil.
2. Combine the quinoa, almond flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg in a medium bowl and set aside.
3. Combine the eggs, honey, vanilla, banana and oil in another bowl. Mix well and add the dry ingredients. Mix until fully combined.
4. Fold in the zucchini and chocolate chips.
5. Pour 1 Tablespoon of batter into 24 mini muffin tins.
6. Bake for 18 minutes or until golden and set.
7. Remove from oven and let cool for 5 minutes.
8. Transfer out of muffin pan and cool on wire rack. Enjoy!

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Week #10 2017

Dinner with lettuce, kohlrabi, new potatoes and crispy shallots

What a head of lettuce!

New potatoes

roasted with olive oil, salt, pepper and a dash of cayenne pepper

• Radish or Turnip
• Lettuce
• Kohlrabi
• Spinach
• Kale
• Green onions
• Summer squash !! the first, but certainly not the last, it is just starting.
• Dill or parsley or basil
• Beets or carrots (hopefully enough this week for everyone to enjoy
• Broccoli or peas (possibly both)
• New potatoes

I write this note with a rough idea what is out in the field and sometimes when I get out there things have changed. Last Sunday after I happily reported a change in our fortunes, “things are turning around at La Finquita” Juvencio shared the news that our horse and his pals, the goats and sheep had roamed through the field the night before munching on just about everything. They tasted the lettuce, the broccoli, cabbage, sunflowers, parsley, peas and beans. The damage could have been complete, but it was not, I guess they got full or something caused a stomach upset. Luna and Mikaela were able to get Venture back in the corral. He was vocal the rest of the morning about the havoc he has wreaked.
So, take what I write at 0600 with a grain of salt, by 0700 things can be very different. Last week I made the mistake of listing both turnips and kohlrabi and told Juve either/or. Sorry that some of you received none ☹. I also forgot to list Kale as an item even though it was labeled and harvested for everyone. Alas, we all make errors, thank you to Kira for pointing it out to me. Please do let us know if something seems odd, not listed etc. Please do your part as well, turn the labels of the bins so that everyone can read them. Please coordinate with your share partner as sometimes both people pick up on the same and we end up short. We do harvest extra of each item just in case but last week was an odd confluence of errors.

The rain brightened the farm, just look out in the field! Vincent was a life saver with the onions and shallots. They are all weeded (for now!) and they are growing like crazy. As we approach the equinox they put all their energy into the green part, but as of the 21st of this month that focus will change and they will begin to bulb up. Check it out, it is amazing to see how daylight sensitive crops behave. The garlic is another crop in a similar situation. About 3 weeks after we pull the garlic scapes (flowers) they send their energy into the bulb and it is time for harvest. The green tops of the garlic is rapidly browning and will signal harvest time in the next two weeks.
The tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are taking off and setting flowers. We move from hoop house lettuce to outdoor lettuce. We are so excited for you to try it! We transplant (I do the seeding and transplanting) lettuce every week, but despite the best laid plans it often is ready at the same time. So we are swimming in lettuce which means you have to eat salad every day or try the soup or salad wraps or something. Thanks to Evita for this recipe, we are making it tonight!

I am unable to finish a note without commentary on our political state. Our democracy is in peril we have to stay on top of this. The Donald is ignorant, dangerous, racist and completely unfit to be president. “Standing by this president makes you an embarrassment to all that is good in this country. It makes you a stain on the fabric of our nation. It makes you the antithesis of everything that your party purports to stand for. Simply put, it makes you un-American.” Michael Starr Hopkins. Onward . . .

Cream of Lettuce Soup
Eric Ursin
2 ½ cups of vegetable broth
2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 small onion
2 cloves garlic
1 medium potato
3 quarts chopped lettuce
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
¾ cup cold water
1 tablespoon arrowroot
½ table spoon tahini
½ cup milk (almond milk)
Combine water, vegetable broth and tamari in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Sauté onion and garlic in olive oil until tender. Add the potato and broth and simmer until the potato is tender. Add the greens and simmer for 10 minutes. Blend until smooth. Stir in the vinegar. Mix the remaining ingredients in a small bowl and slowly add to the soup. Just allow the soup to gently simmer long enough to allow the arrowroot to thicken the soup. Serve with fresh grated Romano cheese.

Carrots prepared in a way so that children will love them
Ingredients
o 10 carrots (about 1 ounce [30 g] each)
o 1 tablespoon (20 g) honey
o Black and white sesame seeds
o A little cayenne pepper
o Salt
Directions
Heat a convection oven to 525°F (275°C).
Peel the carrots, coat them liberally with honey, and sprinkle them with sesame seeds, cayenne, and salt.
Bake the carrots for 5 minutes, or until they are slightly charred, but still crunchy.

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Week #9 2017

 Lettuce – may be getting slightly bitter, make a good salad dressing and it is all good, we are almost ready to start harvesting the lettuce from outside the hoop houses.
 Green onions
 Spinach
 Kale
 Sugar snap peas
 New potatoes ?? yippy the first new potatoes, enjoy them fresh and expect more in the future
 Turnips or kohlrabi (see great recipe from my friend Polly below, really you could use either in the recipe
 Broccoli – some Chinese broccoli and some head broccoli your choice
 Garlic scapes – use them like garlic or on the grill they are sweet and garlicky all at once
 Beets or carrots – little by little these seeded crops are so hard to get enough of, enjoy what you get

So much going on locally and in the world. I don’t have time today to reflect but I appreciate all those who are involved in their own way in making this world a better place. We care deeply about the environment and environmental justice and are doing our small part to work to protect our climate. I know there is much more that we can do. You are doing your part as well, supporting local food production in an environmentally conscious way. You are showing your children and friends a different path away from petrochemicals. Thank you for supporting this food system as we all work towards a more sustainable path to the future. We are so pleased that our governor has chosen to join forces with so many other state officials to support the Paris accord. Trump does not speak for us.
Here are some recipes that you may enjoy this week:

ROASTED NEW POTATOES WITH SPRING HERB PESTO
3/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/3 cup chopped fresh chives
3 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 1/2 pounds red-skinned new potatoes, halved lengthwise
Blend parsley, chives, rosemary, 1 tablespoon olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, lemon peel, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in processor to coarse puree. (Pesto can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)
Preheat oven to 400°F. Toss potatoes and remaining 2 tablespoons oil in large bowl. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, on rimmed baking sheet. Roast until potatoes are golden brown and tender, about 40 minutes. Using spatula, transfer potatoes to large bowl. Add pesto and toss to coat. Serve.

Kohlrabi and Carrot Coleslaw

Dressing:

2 Tbsp. very finely chopped onion
1/2 cup low fat sour cream
1/2 cup eggless mayonnaise
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp chopped fresh dill
2 Tbsp chopped parsley
pepper to taste

1 1/2 lbs kohlrabi, peeled and shredded (about 4 cups)
2 medium carrots, shredded

In a bowl, combine dressing ingredients and mix well. Add kohlrabi and carrots and toss. Servces 4-6.


Moroccan Chicken and Turnip Stew

2 cups cooked chickpeas
2 small (2 1/2 lb) chickens
3 Tb butter
1 Tb oil
2 onions
5 cups chicken stock
1/2 tsp white pepper
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/8 tsp powdered saffron
1/2 tsp turmeric
1 lb small turnips
2 cups chopped turnip leaves and stems
1/4 cup lemon juice
Salt and Pepper to taste

Rinse chickpeas in water and rub lightly to remove skins; drain and set aside. Cut chickens into quarters, removing wing tips and backbones; put them aside for stock. Melt butter and oil in a casserole and lightly brown chicken on all sides, cooking in two batches if necessary. Slice onions and stir into butter and oil to color. Then add the chickpeas, stock, pepper, ginger, saffron, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add turnips and greens and simmer 20 minutes more. Remove chicken and turnips to a covered warm dish. Boil sauce to reduce, mashing some of the chickpeas against the side of the pan to thicken the sauce; it may take 10-15 minutes to produce a nice thick sauce. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Reheat the chicken and turnips in the sauce and serve. Serves 6 to 8. From The Victory Garden Cookbook.

Easy Pasta with Greens & Garlic Scapes

Posted by Carole Koch
1/3 pound penne or farfalle pasta
2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, diced
2 or 3 garlic scapes, chopped
1/2 pound kale, Swiss chard, and/or turnip leaves, chopped
salt and pepper to taste
Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat, add the onions and garlic scapes, and cook until tender. Add the greens and saute until wilted. Drain pasta and combine it with the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve immediately. Serves 2.

Fried Garlic Scapes
Posted by Carole Koch
Cut scapes into green bean size pieces. Sauté them in butter and a little salt for six to eight minutes, or until tender but still bright green. During the last minute of cooking add a splash of balsamic vinegar to taste. Serve hot.
Chicken With Garlic Scapes & Capers
Posted by Carole Koch
Thanks to contributing editor Lauren White for sharing this recipe!
2 whole skinless boneless chicken breasts, each cut in half
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 tablespoons dry white wine
2 tablespoons lemon juice
4 chopped garlic scapes
1 tablespoons drained capers
Between sheets of plastic wrap slightly flatten chicken. In a large heavy skillet heat 1 tablespoon of the butter and the oil over medium high heat.
Sauté chicken until cooked through. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer chicken to a platter and keep warm.
Pour fat from skillet and add the wine, lemon juice, scapes and remaining butter. Bring to a boil, stir in capers, add salt and pepper to taste. Spoon sauce over chicken.
Serves 4.


Roasted Turnips and their greens

Ingredients
1. 1/4 cup pitted kalamata olives
2. 1 navel orange, plus 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
3. 2 pounds young turnips and their greens—turnips halved, greens stemmed and chopped
4. 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
5. 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
6. 1 garlic clove, minced
7. 1/2 cup water
8. Salt and freshly ground pepper
9. 2 ounces baby spinach (2 cups)
10. 2 tablespoons chopped hazelnuts
Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 400°. In a mini food processor, puree the olives; transfer to a bowl. Using a sharp knife, peel the orange, removing all of the bitter white pith. Working over another bowl, cut in between the membranes to release the sections.
2. On a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle the turnips with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, until almost tender.
3. Meanwhile, in a large, deep skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the water and turnip greens, cover and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the greens are just tender, 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Pour the orange juice over the turnips. Roast for 5 minutes longer, until the turnips are tender and glazed; season with salt.
5. Add the spinach to the greens; toss until wilted. Drizzle the pureed olives onto a platter. Top with the turnips, greens, orange sections and hazelnuts. Serve hot or warm.

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Week #8 2017

Week #8 2017
• Lettuce – we are finally giving heads of lettuce, no more salad mix! (at least for now) don’t forget to try my salad dressing if you haven’t already.
• Kale – she is back and growing strong, a little flea beetle damaged around the edges, but . . .
• Spinach – great in smoothies, or cooked in Saag.
• Kohlrabi!! – we have been waiting for months for this broccoli cousin to form the round ball in the stem. I just ate my first one yesterday, peeled it and ate it like an apple.
• Green onions – remember to add them to any meal you are cooking for extra flavor and nutrients.
• Garlic scapes are here! This is the flower end of the garlic that must be removed in order to push energy into the bulb. Use it like garlic or green onions. They are sweet on the grill and made into their own “pesto”
• Peas – hopefully enough from the three beds for everyone to get a taste. We will need our helpers next week.
• Chinese broccoli or carrots or beets – your choice while supplies last
• Turnips or radishes – the tops of these are good to eat as well.
• Dill or cilantro or shiso (red leafy veggie that looks like basil and has a sharp interesting flavor)

The shock and horror of a heinous hate crime right here in Portland has once again focused our attention on what is important. Not on the hate of one person, but on the bravery and love of so many people. The three people who risked and gave their lives to defend women in our community was an act of heroism with the ultimate sacrifice. Our hearts go out to their families as they grieve. Our community has shown that we will not stand for this hatred, we will continue to rise up against it and stand strong together. Many of you went to the vigil last night at the Hollywood max station and we thank you for that. We saw others at the Ramadan Tent Project Portland which ballooned from around 100 last year to over 500 people last night (my estimates). Both events will carry on over the weekend so there is still time to show your support. Here is the link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1812242455702628. There is also fund raising going on for the families of the slain and injured men.

Consider contributing to these options:
https://www.gofundme.com/tri-met-hero-recovery

It is so hard to turn away from politics as we are the laughing stalk of the world and cries for removal of Trump from other countries abound. He is not only laughable but extremely dangerous. He must be stopped. On the way to the Ramadan tent I listened to Betsy Devos state publically in front of a congressional hearing that there was no instance where she would stand up for discrimination against any student. “Parents know best what environment is right for their children, we should let them and their local and state governments decide who should be allowed admission into federally funded schools (charters)”. I am reminded that action is a daily activity and that is a fact of life.

It is hard to talk about the farm when my mind is swirling with so many larger problems. We finally have a harvest that is more typical of this time of year. Even when I look back on previous years I see that we are three weeks behind, but at least there are vegetables! We can see green in the fields, but water is the next challenge. After record breaking rains our soil is clay like and the plants are parched. The need for lots of hand watering has not helped either. Juve has been working double time hand howing, adding compost and laying water lines. Sam helped me plant over 400 squash plants in one morning. It was a huge feat and now we have to lay water lines and get them covered before the cucumber beetles nibble their growing crowns.

Sam (our Catlin Gable School intern) had her final day on the farm on Friday and helped us at the Beaverton Farmers Market on the busiest day of the year. She heads off to her next adventures at Columbia University, where she will continue her education and her soccer career. We so appreciated having her around the farm, she was truly helpful and a joy to have around.

We sent off Jacob to his next adventure. He is working in Homer, Alaska as a research assistant for then next 6- 9 months. He arrived on Thursday night and early Friday morning he was in the field helping disassemble field gear and assess projects that will be the focus of the summer research season. We know this will be a formative time for him and wish him the very best. If you see me moping about know that my heart is heavy for so many reasons.

Without Jacob, our harvesting crew is down one and soon Diego leaves for his travels. We are thankful for Luna and Mikaela who are here with us each Sunday. We have a stand in crew who help on Wednesdays made up of any combination of Catherine, Ann, Bob, Jean, Marianne or Eldon, who we thank. We are at the point where we can use your help, so sign up and show up for harvest help at least twice this season. Peas, beans, cherry tomatoes are all very time consuming. We will need help weeding the giant rows of onions if harvesting times don’t work for you.
Thank you for being part or our community. Thank you for sticking with us through the tough season and for entrusting us to grow the food you feed your family. We are so much stronger together. See you around the farm.

Garlic Scape Hummus
Posted by Carole Koch
Thanks to Kelly Long, Illinois Benedictine University Dietetic Intern, for sharing this recipe!
2 cans of chick peas (garbanzos) drained
1 cup sesame seeds or tahini
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup fresh chopped garlic scapes
Place the ingredients in a blender on high until a thick paste forms. Salt to taste.
Optional: add your favorite curry, to taste.
From www.dakotagarlic.com.
<< Garlic Scapes - A Springtime Treat | Main | Broccoli & Bean Salad >>

Garlic Scape Vichyssoise
8 garlic scapes, coarsely chopped
1 small onion, sliced
1 Tb butter
3 medium potatoes unpeeled and cubed
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
½ Tb salt (omit if using canned stock)
1 cup milk
1 cup cream (divided)
Arugula and chives (chopped fine), and black or white pepper, for serving
Sauté scapes and onion in butter until limp, 5-8 minutes. Add potato, stock, and salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer rapidly, uncovered, 35 minutes, until potato is very tender. Fill blend half full (to avoid splattering), blend till very smooth – 3-4 minutes. Repeat until all blended. Strain into the saucepan through a wire-mesh strainer, add milk and half the cream, and bring slowly almost to a boil, stirring often and scraping the bottom to avoid scorching. Remove from heat and stir in remaining cream. Add salt. Cover and chill thoroughly. To serve, put some chopped arugula in the bottom of each bowl, ladle on the soup, add a dash of white vinegar, garnish with chives and pepper.
Posted by maryellen at June 19, 2007 09:06 PM
Kohlrabi Saute w/ Garlic & Lemon Juice:

2 med Kohlrabi bulbs
1 Tbls olive oil
1 Garlic clove, finely chopped
1 med Onion, chopped
1 Tbls Lemon juice
2 Tbls Parsley, chopped
2 Tbls sour cream
Salt & freshly ground pepper
Peel the tough outer skin from the kohlrabi, then coarsely grate the bulbs. In a skillet, heat olive oil. Add garlic, onion and kohlrabi and saute, stirring for 5 to 7 minutes until kohlrabi is tender crisp. Stir in lemon juice and parsley, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in sour cream, and serve hot.

Kale with Garlic and Bacon
1 slice of bacon chopped (I use pancetta)
1 garlic clove
6 cups (or what you have) chopped kale, washed
1 cup water (I used chicken broth)

In al large heavy skillet cook the bacon over the moderate heat, stirring, until it is crisp and transfer it to paper towels to drain. In te fat remaining in the skillet cook the garlic, stirring, until it is golden, add the kale and the water and simmer the mixture, covered for 10 minutes or until the kale is wilted and tender. Simmer the mixture, uncovered until most of the liquid is evaporated, add the bacon, salt and pepper to taste. Serves 2.

Easy Pasta with Greens & Garlic Scapes
Posted by Carole Koch
1/3 pound penne or farfalle pasta
2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, diced
2 or 3 garlic scapes, chopped
1/2 pound kale, Swiss chard, and/or turnip leaves, chopped
salt and pepper to taste
Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat, add the onions and garlic scapes, and cook until tender. Add the greens and saute until wilted. Drain pasta and combine it with the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve immediately. Serves 2.

Fried Garlic Scapes
Posted by Carole Koch
Cut scapes into green bean size pieces. Sauté them in butter and a little salt for six to eight minutes, or until tender but still bright green. During the last minute of cooking add a splash of balsamic vinegar to taste. Serve hot.
Chicken With Garlic Scapes & Capers
Posted by Carole Koch
Thanks to contributing editor Lauren White for sharing this recipe!
2 whole skinless boneless chicken breasts, each cut in half
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 tablespoons dry white wine
2 tablespoons lemon juice
4 chopped garlic scapes
1 tablespoons drained capers
Between sheets of plastic wrap slightly flatten chicken. In a large heavy skillet heat 1 tablespoon of the butter and the oil over medium high heat.
Sauté chicken until cooked through. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer chicken to a platter and keep warm.
Pour fat from skillet and add the wine, lemon juice, scapes and remaining butter. Bring to a boil, stir in capers, add salt and pepper to taste. Spoon sauce over chicken.
Serves 4.

Crunchy Red Devils recipe by A. Doncsecz, Vegetarian Gourmet
2 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup hot red pepper sauce
1 teaspoon grainy mustard
½ teaspoon sugar
3 medium kohlrabi bulbs
Whisk together all ingredients except kohlrabi with ½ cup water. Peel and thinly slice kohlrabi; stir into marinade, coating evenly. Cover and refrigerate 2-3 days, stirring occasionally. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Stir-Fried Kohlrabi from The Goodness of Potatoes and Root Vegetables
3 kohlrabi, peeled
3 medium carrots
4 tablespoons peanut or safflower oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
1 inch piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced
3 green onions, sliced
1-2 fresh chili peppers, sliced, optional
salt
4 tablespoons oyster sauce (optional)
3 teaspoons sesame oil & soy sauce, each
Slice kohlrabi and carrots into thin ovals. Heat oil in large heavy skillet; when it begins to smoke, toss in garlic and ginger. Stir once then add kohlrabi and carrots; toss and cook 2 minutes. Add green onions and chilies; stir-fry 1 minute, then pour in ½ cup water. Cover, reduce heat and cook 5 minutes. Remove cover and toss in a little salt and the sesame and soy, and oyster if using. Serve with rice.

Kohlrabi Pickle Chips from the Victory Garden Cookbook
1-2 pounds smallish kohlrabi, trimmed
3 small onions
1/4 cup pickling salt
2 cups vinegar
2/3 cup sugar
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon tumeric
Peel and thinly slice kohlrabi and onions. Mix salt with 1 quart ice water, pour over the vegetables, and soak for 3 hours. Drain, rinse, and place in a bowl. Bring remaining ingredients to a boil, cook for 3 minutes, and pour over the vegetables. Cool, cover and refrigerate for 3 days

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

1 cup olive oil
1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar
salt and pepper
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 clove garlic pressed

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid. Shake until creamy and well blended.

Chinese Broccoli
(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)
1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem
2-4 cloves of garlic minced
1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce
¼ cup water
Olive oil
Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

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Week #7, 2017

Week #7


• Salad mix
• Braising mix
• Dill or cilantro
• Green onions
• Chinese broccoli or sugar snap peas

I am trying not to sound like a broken record, but we continue to struggle to come back from a rough winter/start to the growing season. Although we have done this farming thing for 17 years, this season has been different. The confluence of events, the alignment of the stars, or whatever has left us feeling frustrated that the quantity of produce we are accustomed to providing is just not there yet. I lay awake at night counting beds, thinking about each vegetable and it’s particular set back, kind of like counting sheep. The reasons abound, but it still baffles me that there can be so many different failings.
The weather is only one factor, but it is huge. The cold wet spring has affected the growing rate of the plants. Competition among plants has left some mainstays like kale stunted. Oh, and the bark chips in the two new greenhouses have bound nutrients that seedlings need to grow. We keep looking for the break, when will the crops “take off” it seems far off. We start with sugar snap peas this week. We have ¼ the production we are expecting. We have 300 feet planted, but 230 feet is in a woodchip laden greenhouse where the plants are 4 feet high instead of 8! We planted 400 feet of Chinese broccoli and 50 feet is producing normally. This story unfortunately repeats itself with many crops, so we plug on.
Juvencio has been busy hauling manure from a local horse owner. He has been hand spreading compost onto all beds that have been previously planted. He has hand tilled between every row in the field. I have been juggling my time from work at the clinic to work on the farm. I planted pole beans, peppers, tomatoes and more this week. I managed to get the seeding of the Brussels sprouts and fall cabbages done. A new threat to the germination of the fall crops was detected yesterday so we will see what we can do to pepper spray the fungus gnats that are growing strong in our seeding greenhouses. It is a never ending battle to seed, weed, compost and battle the pest of the week.
If you are tired of driving out to the farm each week, please join the veggie pool. Ana Helena has organized and is willing to hook you up with other members in your general neighborhood to pick up less often and gather veggies for others. Email me and I will forward it on to Ana!
Creamy Dill Sauce
Farmer John’s Cookbook

Great on egg salad, or tossed with cucumbers, or as a sauce for fish or crab cakes.
Serves about ¾ cup

½ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar or sherry wine vinegar
½ teaspoon minced shallots
¼ teaspoon Dijon mustard
Pinch of salt plus more to taste
Freshly ground pepper
1 egg yolk
¼ cup sour cream
3 tablespoons minced fresh dill
Lemon juice

1. Combine the oil, vinegar, shallot, mustard, pinch of salt, and pepper to taste in a large jar. Cover tightly and shake the jar vigorously until the oil and vinegar have thickened.
2. Beat the egg yolk with the sour cream in a separate bowl until well combined.
3. If you’re using a food processor: Process the yolk and sour cream for 30 seconds and then add the vinaigrette in a very thin stream in about three additions, letting the sauce thicken before each addition. If you’re making the dressing by hand: Using a good whisk, beat the yolk and sour cream, then add the vinaigrette and scant tablespoon at a time, whisking thoroughly after each addition, until the vinaigrette is fully combined with the egg yolk and sour cream.
4. Once you’ve incorporated the last of the vinaigrette and the sauce is very thick thin it with either the lemon juice (1 or 2 teaspoons) or by vigorously stirring in 1 tablespoon of water.
5. Stir in the dill and add salt and pepper to taste.

Chinese Scallion Pancakes
recipe by Elsa Chen
Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups flour, plus more for flouring the rolling surface
1 cup water
2 teaspoons oil
A bunch of green onions, green and white parts, chopped medium-fine
A few tablespoons of oil to brush on pancakes (a mix of canola or corn oil and sesame oil is good) some salt A few tablespoons sesame seeds (optional)
Directions:
Mix together the first three ingredients by hand or in a food processor. Flour a surface and knead the dough. Let it rest for 20-30 minutes before continuing.
With a rolling pin, roll the dough out on a well-floured surface into a big, flat square or rectangle 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
Brush the pancake with a bit of oil, and sprinkle with spring onion pieces and a little salt. Starting at one short end, roll up the dough tightly, jelly-roll style, so you have a “snake.”
Cut the “snake” crosswise into 8 – 10 pieces. Then flatten each piece again gently with your palm and rolling pin to make a little rectangle. Don’t flatten it too firmly, because you want a little air to remain trapped between the layers of the pancakes so they’ll puff up a bit between the layers and be lighter.
Press one or both sides in sesame seeds (optional).
Heat a tablespoon or two of oil in a large skillet. Shallow fry the pancakes until both sides are golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels.
Serve plain or with dipping sauce. An easy sauce can be made by mixing soy sauce with a little minced garlic, scallion, and rice vinegar.
Green Onion Pancake by Stella Fong
2 cups flour
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/2 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 to 1/2 cup cold water
vegetable oil spray
1/2 cup minced green onions
Mix together flour and boiling water. Add 1/3 cup cold water and knead until dough is smooth and elastic. Add more water if necessary. Cover and let dough rest for about 15 minutes. In a small bowl, combine sesame oil, salt and green onions. Set aside. Divide dough into 10 pieces. Flatten each piece in the palm of your hand. Then roll out into a 6-inch circle. Spread each piece with the green onion mixture.
Roll up dough into a jellyroll. Then wind up into a snail shape. Flatten slightly; roll on lightly floured surface to 5-inch circle. Spray pan with vegetable oil spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Fry pancake until golden brown, about 2 minutes, turn and cook other side. Serve hot. Makes 10 pancakes

I decided to include Sue Kass’ greens primer as greens are what we have and this seems to be a good way to make them enjoyable for your family:
“I was thinking today how all the marvelous greens are somewhat a bit daunting for new CSA members, so I will offer a few recipe and a few tips

Tip #1: Lots of the veggies–beets, radishes, broccoli, kohlarabi–come with “greens” that many might neglects. Cook ’em up like you would any other green
Tip #2: Most of those glorious greens can be used interchangeably and/or as you would spinach in things like soups, lasagne, spanokopita, etc
Tip # 3: when you are drowning in greens and the next batch is about to arrive, steam them until wilted in a large skilllet with a few tablespoons of water. Stuff the cooked greens and their
liquid into a ziploc and toss in the freezer. You’ve got quick cooked greens ready to go for a recipe or in the dark of winter when kale is $2.50 a sickly bunch
Tip #4: the more assertive greens, like mustards, bok choy, etc benefit from chopping rather finely if you plan to eat them raw in a salad. I usually dress those in a stronger flavored dressing
and let them marinate a bit more before serving (see dressings below)

Fresh Ginger-Sesame Dressing (for an “asian-style coleslaw but also tames mustard nicely)

1/2 c rice vinegar
1Tb dark sesame oil
1/8 c sugar
1 Tbs grated fresh ginger
2 tsp soy sauce
salt, pepper to taste

Thai-Style Lemon Dressing

4 Tbs lemon juice
4 tsp peanut oil
4 tsp brown sugar
2 tsp fish sauce

Toss with a mix of greens, mint, cilantro

Kass family Beans n Greens (we eat this about once a week, year round)

1-2 bunches fresh greens (or equivalent in frozen)
Small onion or large shallot, fnely chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, ” ”
1/4-1/2 tsp red pepper flakes
1-2 Tbs olive oil
1/4 c. white wine or sherry
1-2 c. cooked beans (I typically use canned drained caneloni or white kidney beans)

Wash greens, leave damp and cook in a large skillet with a few tbs water until just tender. Set aside, reserving liquid.
Wipe out pan and saute onions and garlic and pepper flakes in oil until soft, then add wine and boil until reduced and a bit syrupy.
Meanwhile chop greens.
Add greens back into pan with their juices and with beans; you may need to add a bit of water to make mixture “loose”
Cook for 5-10 minutes more to allow flavors to marry, add salt/black pepper to taste. Serve over rice, quinoa, bulgar or
grain of your choice, sprinkle with parmesan

Empanadas with Greens & Olives–great lunch/picnic way to eat your greens!

Yeasted olive oil dough (see below)
10 c. mixed greens, cleaned/stemmed
2 Tbs olive oil
1 small onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 c. chopped parsley
red pepper flakes
1/2 c. pitted kalamata oiives, coarsely chopped
1/2 c grated cheese (I’ve done provolone, fontina, jack, parmesan, mozzarella, or mixed)
1 beaten egg.

Make dough and while it is risng, prepare the greens.

Wash greens, don’t dry. Heat oil in a large wide skillet, saute the garlic, onions, pepper, parsley until onions are tender, then add the greens and cook until tender. Gently squeeze the mixture to drain off excess moisture and chop finely. Mix the seasoned greens with olives, cheese, egg. Season to taste w/salt and pepper.

Divide dough into 12 pieces and roll each piece into a 4″ circle. Place 1 1/2 Tb of filling in center of the circle and fold over or fold up edges, pinch well to seal. Place on ungreased sheet and bake 20-30 miutes at 375 until golden brown. Serve hot or at room temperature. Freeze well for later consumption.

Yeasted dough:2 tsp dry yeast, 1/2 tsp sugar, 1/2 c warm water–> Blend and allow to sit 10 minutes or until foamy. Mix in 3 Tbs olive oil, 1 beaten egg and pinch slt. Work in 1 3/4 c. flour (or a little more) until you have a smooth, elastic kneadable dough. Knead briefly, then place in lightly oiled bowl and let rise 45 minutes or more until doubles in bulk. This is a very sturdy and forgiving dough.”

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