Thanksgiving harvest 2017

Thanksgiving Harvest 2017

  • Lettuce
  • Sage or thyme
  • Parsley
  • Bok coi
  • Kale
  • Spinach or chard
  • Celery or celeriac
  • Cilantro or dill
  • Broccoli, cauliflower or romanesco
  • Brussels sprouts (hurrah we did it!!)
  • Green peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Tomatoes (green tomato pie or fried green tomatoes here we come!)
  • Winter squash
  • Pie pumpkin
  • Shallots
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Green onions
  • Radishes or turnips
  • Radicchio  the greatest tip is to wash the radicchio in cold water and then let it rest in ice water at least 30 minutes, you will note, no more bitter!)
  • Fennel

It is really here, the end of fall and the end of the 2017 season. We have been gifted with mild temperatures that allowed us to keep the broccoli going, especially considering the late start to this fall favorite. The greenhouses have helped get you some of the biggest lettuces we have grown all season. I planted them when we pulled the melons in mid September and it is paying off. Luna and I started to harvest on Friday to be able to get you this huge bounty by Sunday at a reasonable time. Juvencio took a surprise trip to Honduras to be with his family as they celebrate his father’s 90th birthday. We are so glad he could go and share in the festivities. The surprise alone was worth it.

I will have soup, cookies and warm drinks to share in the barn on Sunday afternoon for those who choose to pick up there veggies then. The barn is open for pick up on Monday as well, but the treats won’t be there. My studio is decked out in fall slender. I have wreaths, bird feeders and my newest ceramics. I may have a few evergreen wreaths as well. Please take a look around.

We are always pleased to get word that you will continue in 2018. A deposit of $100 is also welcome to reserve your spot. Send us your referrals, your friends make our best customers as they come to us knowing a bit more what to expect and have a trusted friend encouraging them to get on the local food/slow food movement train.

Here are some of my favorite recipes. It is time for soup and lots of items I have included in today’s harvest are great roasted or put in soups. Enjoy your holiday with those you love and those who need a warm place to rest and a hearty meal. We are deeply grateful for the opportunity to grow food for your family. This work feeds us as well in so many ways.

Curried Winter Squash Soup

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

 

Serves 6-8

 

3 T unsalted butter

1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed

4 cups chicken or vegetable stock

1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes

12 whole curry leaves (optional)

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)

pinch freshly grated nutmeg

2 teaspoons curry powder

salt

freshly ground pepper

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

 

  1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.
  3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
  4. Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

 

 

SPICED WINTER SQUASH WITH FENNEL
1 1 1/2-pound butternut squash, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, halved crosswise, then cut lengthwise into 3/4-inch-wide wedges
1 fennel bulb, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 1-inch-wide wedges
1 large onion, root end left intact, then cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch-wide wedges
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 450°F. Combine squash, fennel, and onion on heavy large rimmed baking sheet. Add oil and toss to coat. Mix all spices in small bowl to blend. Sprinkle spice mixture over vegetables and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt and generous amount of pepper. Roast until vegetables are tender and browned, turning once, about 45 minutes. Transfer to shallow dish and serve.

Bon Appétit
October 2004

 

Roasted Cauliflower and Radicchio Salad
1 large head cauliflower (3 to 3 1/2 punds), cut into 1-inch-wide florets (9 cups)
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup white-wine vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
2 heads romaine (2 pounds total), cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide strips
1 large head radicchio (3/4 pound), cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide strips
1 cup loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves (from 1 bunch)
1/2 cup hazelnuts (2 1/4 ounces), toasted , any loose skins rubbed off in a kitchen towel, and nuts coarsely chopped

Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 450°F.

Toss cauliflower with 1/4 cup oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper in a large bowl. Spread in 1 layer in a shallow baking pan (1 inch deep) and roast, turning over with tongs halfway through roasting, until tender and golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes total. Cool in pan on a rack, then transfer to large bowl.

Whisk together vinegar, shallot, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper in a small bowl, then add remaining 5 tablespoons oil in a slow stream, whisking until emulsified. Add half of dressing to cauliflower and toss to coat. Add romaine, radicchio, parsley, half of nuts, and remaining dressing to cauliflower and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with remaining nuts.

Crunchy Spring Salad with Dill Dressing

Serves 6 as a side dish

For the salad:
8 ounces (about 2 cups) sugar snap peas, trimmed
4 small radishes, thinly sliced (I use a mandoline)
3 small stalks celery, sliced crosswise into bite-size pieces
1 large romaine heart, chopped into bite-size pieces

For the dressing:
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons minced fresh dill
1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon minced shallot
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Place all the salad ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.

In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar and salt until the salt dissolves. Add dill, mustard and shallot and whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in olive oil, whisking constantly, until dressing is smooth and emulsified. Pour dressing over salad and toss until all ingredients are evenly coated.

Additional Notes

  • Salad will keep, dressed and refrigerated, for up to 6 hours. For longer storage, keep chopped and assembled salad ingredients covered in the refrigerator up to 1 day ahead and toss with dressing just before serving.

 

 

 

Cilantro and lime chicken

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1/4 c. chopped fresh cilantro
  • pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 4 bone-in skin-on chicken thighs
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • cooked white rice, for serving

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make marinade: Whisk together 2 tablespoons olive oil, lime juice, cilantro, red pepper flakes, garlic and cumin. Add chicken and toss to evenly coat with the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours.
  2. When you’re ready to cook the chicken, preheat oven to 425°.
  3. Pour remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil into a large oven-proof skillet and heat over medium-high heat. Season both sides of marinated chicken with salt and pepper, then add chicken skin-side down and pour in the remaining marinade. Sear until the skin becomes golden and crispy, about 6 minutes. Flip the chicken and cook for 2 minutes more. (Chicken should not yet be cooked through.)
  4. Turn off the heat and transfer pan into hot oven; bake until the chicken is cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes.
  5. Serve with white rice and drizzle with extra pan drippings.

 

Bok Choy:

from a CSA member:
Bok Choy: (the bok choy in the box was amazingly good!)

1 T oil
1.5 lbs bok choy
1 T light soy sauce
2 T chicken stock or water

Heat wok over moderate heat. Add oil and then bok choy. Stir fry 3-4
minutes, until leaves have wilted a little. Add soy sauce and chicken stock/water.
Continue to stir fry for a few more minutes, until the bok choy is done until still slightly
crisp.

Very easy, very good.
Source: Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery
(very good recipes, clear instructions, and excellent taste)

SAUTEED BOK CHOY W/ CASHEW SAUCE
Serving Size : 4
1/2 c Cashews — roasted
1/4 c White vinegar
1/4 c Water
1/4 c Sugar
1/4 c Soy sauce
1 tb Ginger — minced
7 dashes Tabasco sauce
2 tb Basil — finely chopped
2 tb Mint — finely chopped
1 1/2 lb Bok choy — washed & dried 1/3 c Peanut oil 1. In a food processor or blender, combine the cashews, vinegar, water, sugar, soy sauce, ginger, Tabasco, basil and mint, and puree. 2. Separate bok choy leaves from stalks, and cut stalks into 1-inch-long- pieces. In a large sauté pan, heat oil over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add bok choy and cook, stirring briskly, for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, until it is bright green and well seared. Remove from heat, drape with cashew sauce and serve at once. Yield: 4 servings. Approximate nutritional analysis per serving: 340 calories, 25 grams fat, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 1,065: milligrams sodium, 7 grams protein, 25 grams carbohydrate. ** New York Times — Living Arts section — 29 November 1995 **

Bok Choy Stir Fry

This is an easy recipe.

1 1/2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry Sherry
1 teaspoon oriental sesame oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
3 1/2 cups thinly sliced trimmed bok choy
1 5-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained
3 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces
10 1/2 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

Combine first 4 ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Heat vegetable oil until very hot in heavy large wok or skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and crushed red pepper. Stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add bok choy and stir-fry until just wilted, about 2 minutes. Mix in water chestnuts and green onions and stir-fry until onions are tender, about 1 minute. Add tofu and lightly stir-fry until tofu is just heated through, about 2 minutes. Pour over soy mixture. Stir-fry until liquid boils and thickens, about 1 minute.

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #29 Last Harvest of the regular 2017 season

 

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes or Kohlrabi
  • Parsley
  • Cabbage or broccoli or cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes (say good bye to summer, try adding roasting them and adding them to soup)
  • Sweet peppers red and green
  • Hot peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Leeks or celeriac
  • Green onions
  • Gourds or pumpkins
  • Spinach or arugula

Well it is hard to believe that the 2017 season is drawing to an end. Juvencio and I got some of the harvest done on Saturday before he had to drop me at the airport. I am off to a conference, leaving him and Luna to bring in the harvest on this soggy weekend. We have had a hard year, harder than others. Spring had many challenges with weather, greenhouses, soil conditions. Summer was better, aliums (onions) were great as were peppers and tomatoes. Fall we have struggled to get some of our standards ready in time for the end of the season. Broccoli and cauliflower and cabbage have not really come on yet and we are heading into the rainy season. I guess you could say we are glad 2017 is ending. We look forward to better luck and magic next season.

The Harvest Festival could not have been more lovely weather wise. It was sunny and warm and not a drop of rain. People seemed to enjoy themselves, cider was made, peppers were roasted and dancers danced. After the official dancers we had little dancers enjoying the beat of our own blues pick up band. There was a lot of pizza made and more dough was brought out as the afternoon wore on. By 6 I had to make another recipe to feed the sweeper crew. Hopefully I will remember the pearls for next year.

 

We are busy getting bulbs in the ground, garlic planted, cover crop seeded and old crops pulled out of the ground. We want to rest , but truthfully it is not time yet. We have walnuts to gather that have not fallen yet from the trees. We hope to get more of it done this week as the weather brightens one last time before the true fall settles in.

We have lots of goodies for you in the barn!

  • Beef is here, $6/# in the freezer next to the cooler. Let us know if you need more, we have about 300# more at the meating place waiting for us to have room. It comes in 1 and 2 pound bags so be aware of what you are picking up.
  • Our friend Kris has brought us Chanterelles, he is offering them at a very low price to our subscribers, available in the cooler
  • Kris also had a bumper crop of honey and has some for sale in the cooler, priced as marked on the jar.
  • Sign up for the Thanksgiving harvest, it will be big. We would like you to prepay the $40 if possible so we don’t have to try and track you down that day. The pick up is 11/19 or 11/20. I will be selling wreaths, bird feeders, holiday wreaths and ceramics that weekend and after Thanksgiving as well so stop into my studio.
  • Sign up for 2018 season!
  • Consider joining our winter share, we will harvest 12 times over the next 5 months. It averages twice a month. We have a few spots left, first come first serve.
  • Please do answer the survey questions I put out earlier this week, your feedback is welcome and will hopefully will help us for next year.

I am going to sign off for now. I leave in just a few hours. We thank you for being part of our community and letting our family grow vegetables for yours. See you around the farm.

 

Here are some fun recipes to try with your veggies this week:

Spiced Pork with Celery Root Purée and Lentils
Celery Root Puree
2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 2-inch cubes
5 cups whole milk
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
Ground white pepper

Lentils
3 bacon slices, chopped
1/4 cup 1/8-inch cubes peeled carrots
1/4 cup chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups dried lentils
3 cups water
1 teaspoon butter

Pork
1/2 cup honey
6 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
2 1/2 pounds pork tenderloins
1 tablespoon olive oil

3/4 cup low-salt chicken broth
1 tablespoon cold butter

For celery root puree:
Bring celery root and milk to boil in heavy large saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until celery root is very tender, about 20 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer celery root to processor. Add 1/2 cup hot milk. Puree until very smooth. Blend in butter and lemon juice. Season with salt and white pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

For lentils:
Sauté bacon in medium saucepan over medium-high heat until crisp, about 3 minutes. Add carrots, shallots, and rosemary; sauté until shallots begin to soften, about 1 minute. Add lentils and 3 cups water; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until lentils are tender and liquid has nearly evaporated, about 35 minutes. Stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.)

vFor pork:
Preheat oven to 400°F. Whisk first 4 ingredients in bowl. Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Heat oil in large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add pork; sauté until brown on all sides, about 6 minutes total. Brush pork with honey mixture. Transfer skillet to oven; roast pork 10 minutes. Turn pork over and brush with honey mixture. Roast until thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 145°F, about 10 minutes longer. Transfer pork to work surface; tent with foil (temperature will increase 5 degrees).

Add broth and remaining honey mixture to same skillet. Boil over high heat until sauce is reduced to 3/4 cup, about 5 minutes. Strain sauce into small bowl. Return sauce to skillet. Whisk in butter. Season with salt and pepper.

Rewarm celery root puree and lentils. Cut pork crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Place 1/2 cup celery root puree in center of each of 6 plates. Using back of spoon, make indentation in puree. Spoon 1/2 cup lentils into indentation on each plate. Arrange pork slices atop lentils and drizzle with sauce.

Bon Appétit
September 2003

 

Celeriac and Tomato Soup

 

4 tomatoes                            2 cups water

2 # celeriac                            ¼ cup lovage chopped (optional)

3  leeks                                   1 onion

1 clove garlic                        1 large carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil         2 T butter

3 sprigs parsley                    6 cups chicken broth

salt and freshly ground pepper

 

Peel, seed, and roughly chop tomatoes.  Peel sufficient celeriac to make 1 ½ pounds trimmed flesh, then cut into ½ inch cubes and drop into acidulated water.  Wash and trim leeks and, using only the white and light green parts, thinly slice.  You should have 1 ½ cups.  Chop onion and combine with leeks.  Chop garlic.  Thinly slice carrot. Heat together oil and butter and sauté leeks and onion until wilted.  Add garlic and carrot, and cook for 5 minutes longer,  Add one third of the tomatoes and cook until they are lightly browned on the edges and the juice is evaporated.  Add Curried Winter Squash Soup

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

 

Serves 6-8

 

3 T unsalted butter

1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed

4 cups chicken or vegetable stock

1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes

12 whole curry leaves (optional)

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)

pinch freshly grated nutmeg

2 teaspoons curry powder

salt

freshly ground pepper

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

 

  1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.
  3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
  4. Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

adrained celeriac, the rest to the tomatoes and the parsley sprig.  Cook together for 10 minutes.  Add chicken broth, water and lovage (if using).  Bring to a boil and reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Puree, season with salt and pepper, and serve with croutons on the side.  (serves 8)  For thinner soup only use 1 pound celeriac and 3 tomatoes.

 

 

Celeriac and Cheese Puree

 

1 large celeriac (2-3 lbs.)

2 large eggs

1/2 c. whole milk or half-and-half

salt and pepper

1 c. grated Gruyere

1 c. plain yogurt

3 Tbsp. lemon juice

1 Tbsp. fresh parsley

 

Quarter celeriac, cook in boiling water until tender (about 30 minutes).  Drain.  Puree, using as much of the milk or half-and-half as necessary to get the mixture smooth.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Combine puree, egg yolks, remaining milk, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl.  Beat until well-blended and stir in cheese.  Beat egg whites into soft peaks and fold into celeriac mixture.

Pour into a large buttered casserole or a 5-by-9-inch loaf pan.  There must be enough room for the mixture to rise.  Cover and bake until a tester comes out clean, about 30 to 40 minutes.

Allow to cool for 5 minutes and unmold onto a serving plate.  Serve with a sauce made of the yogurt, lemon juice and parsley.

From the Winter Harvest Cookbook by Lane Morgan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #28 – Harvest Party today!!

Week #28

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes
  • Parsley
  • Cilantro or dill or basil
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes (say good bye to summer, try adding roasting them and adding them to soup)
  • Sweet peppers red and green
  • Hot peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Kohlrabi
  • Celeriac (celery root, great for soups)

Harvest Festival TODAY from 2-6!  Come party with us here at La Finquita! We have set up our pumpkin patch. We have a walnut collecting race, farm tours, pizza making, cider pressing, pepper roasting. “Mexico en la Piel “ , (Mexico in my skin) will be dancing at 4:30, Blue grass pick up band to follow. I have new ceramics and festival fall wreaths for sale as well as bird feeders. Bring your friends and family and come join us at the farm today.

Next week is the last harvest for the regular 2017 season. Please let us know if you want to purchase the Thanksgiving basket,($40) packed with all the delicious veggies you will want to use at your Thanksgiving table. Going away for Thanksgiving?? No worries these veggies travel well, take them to your host and enjoy them there or store them easily until you return. No excuses not to enjoy another week of fresh fall and winter veggies.

Earthquake Relief

We are collecting new or old tents and tarps to send to Oaxaca. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn. Last Day to drop off is 10/15/17.

CSA Coalition Hiring!

CSA Coalition is hiring by forwarding this to your members, friends, coworkers, family, neighbors, etc. You can find the application here: portlandcsa.org/jobs.

“We are hiring a part-time Program Director to take the lead implementing all of our programming: annual share fair, SNAP processing, tabling at events, website maintenance, and community outreach/marketing. First and foremost we are looking for someone with demonstrated passion for helping small farms thrive and a commitment to seeing this job through the next few years. Our ideal candidate would also have a flexible schedule and excel when working alone. Finally, just like a farmer, we need a candidate who is a jack-of-all-trades with an array of skills in areas like marketing, event planning, fundraising, grant writing, website design, social media, computers and more.”!

 

Sign-up for:

  • Thanksgiving share – sheet in the cooler! (available for pick up November 19,20)
  • 2018 Season – sheet in the cooler! (same price as this year!)
  • Ground Beef – sheet in the cooler! ($6/#) coming next week.
  • Please complete your survey and send it to us at La Finquita, your feedback is appreciated!

 

Take Action:

  • If you live in Hillsboro get out and work to help pass the school bond. This bond does not increase taxes you are already paying, but rather renews a tax you are paying and directs those funds towards upgrades in classrooms, seismic upgrades and increased security at our schools. Visit https://www.hsd.k12.or.us/bond

 

Pasta with Butternut Squash and Kale Pesto

INGREDIENTS

 

1 ½ pounds butternut squash

½ cup extra virgin olive oil, more for drizzling

¾ teaspoon kosher salt, more for squash

Freshly ground black pepper

1 small bunch (about 1/2 pound) lacinato kale, center ribs removed

8 ounces pasta (penne rigate works well)

⅓ cup toasted pine nuts

2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

Freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste

Grated Parmesan cheese, for serving

PREPARATION

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Use a vegetable peeler to peel squash, then halve it lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Dice squash flesh into 1-inch pieces, place on a baking sheet, and toss with olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread pieces into an even layer, making sure there is space between them. Roast, stirring squash pieces once or twice, until golden brown and tender, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; have ready a bowl of ice water. Drop kale into boiling water and cook for 45 seconds. Use tongs or slotted spoon to transfer kale to ice water. Bring water in pot back to a boil, adding more if necessary so there is enough to cook pasta.

Drain kale well, then wrap tightly in a dry kitchen towel and squeeze thoroughly to remove any excess moisture. Roughly chop leaves. When water in pot comes back to a boil, cook pasta according to package directions.

In a food processor, pulse together kale, nuts, garlic, salt and lemon zest until mixture is smooth and salt has dissolved. With motor running, slowly drizzle in the oil until fully incorporated. Taste and add more salt dissolved in a little lemon juice, if necessary.

Drain pasta, reserving a little cooking water. Toss pasta with kale pesto and some pasta cooking water if necessary to help it coat pasta. Add cheese, lemon juice and salt to taste. Serve topped with squash and more cheese.

 

 

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Week #27

 

  • Lettuce
  • Cilantro or basil or parsley
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radishes or beans or Chinese cabbage (grab bag of available veggies)
  • Kale or chard
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Fruit

 

We have two more harvests after this week! It is hard to believe but the 2017 season is winding down

Earthquake Relief

We have good friends who live part time in Oaxaca and part time in Portland. Their home was not damaged in the earthquake and the >500 aftershocks, but they are traveling to southern Mexico in three weeks. They will be taking a truck full of supplies for victims of the earthquakes. This is where you come in! We are collecting new or old tents and tarps for them to take. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn. Last Day to drop off is 10/15/17.

Harvest Party

If you have not put this event on your calendar this is your opportunity! Sunday October 15 from 2-6 p.m. Be there or be square. See and print out the attached flyer and post on your fridge. You are welcome to bring family and friends and show off your farm. We plan to have cider pressing, pepper roasting, music , traditional Mexican dancing and more. I am busy making ceramic mugs and wreaths and bird feeders for sale.

CSA Coalition Hiring!

CSA Coalition is hiring by forwarding this to your members, friends, coworkers, family, neighbors, etc. You can find the application here: portlandcsa.org/jobs.

“We are hiring a part-time Program Director to take the lead implementing all of our programming: annual share fair, SNAP processing, tabling at events, website maintenance, and community outreach/marketing. First and foremost we are looking for someone with demonstrated passion for helping small farms thrive and a commitment to seeing this job through the next few years. Our ideal candidate would also have a flexible schedule and excel when working alone. Finally, just like a farmer, we need a candidate who is a jack-of-all-trades with an array of skills in areas like marketing, event planning, fundraising, grant writing, website design, social media, computers and more.”!

 

Sign-up for:

  • Thanksgiving share – sheet in the barn!
  • 2018 Season – sheet in the barn! (same price as this year!)
  • Ground Beef – sheet in the barn! ($6/#)

 

Take Action:

  • If you live in Hillsboro get out and work to help pass the school bond. This bond does not increase taxes you are already paying, but rather renews a tax you are paying and directs those funds towards upgrades in classrooms, seismic upgrades and increased security at our schools. Visit https://www.hsd.k12.or.us/bond

 

  • Tell your MOC to support the Dreamers and sign on to co-sponsor legislation to make their path permanent. Here are some direct links to action:
    1. https://act.credoaction.com/sign/DACA_Dems?t=3&akid=25327%2E1822401%2EHG_riN
    2. http://ijpr.org/post/immigrants-make-mark-oregons-economy#stream/0 My friend and colleague is featured here, see her family story here how twin sisters, daughters of migrant farmworkers became family physicians working to serve the most needy in our community.
  • Tell your MOC to pass restrictions on bump stock attachments to make semi-automatic rifles fully automatic.
  • Send money to help hurricaine victims, earthquake victims and the families who have been affected by the horrible shooting in Las Vegas.
    1. Donate to the tarp and tent project here at La Finquita
    2. Donate to Mercy Corps
    3. Donate to Doctors Without Borders
    4. Listen and donate to this: Lin-Manuel Miranda’s new song : https://www.newyorker.com/culture/listening-booth/lin-manuel-mirandas-proud-star-filled-tribute-song-for-a-puerto-rico-in-need
    5. https://hispanicfederation.org/donate/
    6. Share the places you have found that use the money you donate in the most effective ways.

 

Here are some recipes for this week:

Kale and Lentil Soup

(Marilyn’s invention from Sue)

3 T EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)

1 onion and 1 rib of celery (chopped and sauté for 4 minutes)

6-7 cups of water

2 cups chicken broth

1 ½ cups green lentils (rinsed and checked)

1 bay leaf

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

½ – 1 # kale (washed and sliced)

12 oz. Kielbasa (slice in 1” rounds)

16 oz. plum tomatoes

2 teaspoons red wine vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste

Sauté onion and celery for 4 minutes. Add water and chicken broth as well as lentils to the sauté mix. Add the bay leaf and red pepper flakes and bring to a boil. Decrease heat to a simmer for 30 minutes. Then add the Kale, kielbasa sausage, tomatoes and red wine vinegar. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 15 minutes more and serve. Great the next day.

 

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE AND GINGER SHRIMP
24 large shrimp in shell (about 1 lb), peeled, leaving tail and first segment of shell intact, and deveined
1 tablespoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2/3 cup chopped shallot
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 3/4 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (5 cups)
4 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs
Toss shrimp with ginger in a bowl and marinate, chilled, 30 minutes (do not marinate any longer or enzymes from ginger will begin to cook shrimp).

Make soup while shrimp marinate:
Cook shallot, garlic, and anise in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until shallot is softened, about 5 minutes. Add squash, stock, and water and simmer, uncovered, until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove star anise.

Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) until very smooth, about 1 minute per batch, then transfer to cleaned pan and keep warm, covered.

Sprinkle marinated shrimp with salt. Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté shrimp in 2 batches, stirring, until just cooked through, about 3 minutes per batch, transferring to paper towels.

Bring soup to a simmer and season with salt and pepper. Divide among 8 shallow soup bowls and mound 3 shrimp in each bowl.

Cooks’ note:
. Soup (without shrimp) can be made 3 days ahead and chilled, covered. If making soup ahead, begin marinating shrimp about 40 minutes before serving.

Gourmet
December 2002

 

DELICATA SQUASH WITH ROSEMARY, SAGE, AND CIDER GLAZE
This is my favorite way to cook winter squash. You peel, and slice it, then cook it in a skillet with cider and
winter herbs. When most of the liquid boils away, the cider forms a tart-sweet glaze around the now-tender squash.

Delicata is a wonderfully firm-textured squash that’s not too sweet and almost like a potato. Other varieties like
acorn, turban, or kabocha will make good substitutes, but they may not hold their shape quite as well through the
braising.

2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm
winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice
1 cup water
2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

1. Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.

2. Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook,
stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.

3. Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender,
20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

 

Roasted Winter Roots with Whole Garlic Heads
From The San Francisco Chronicle Cookbook\

All vegetables may be cooked in the oven at the same time. The heads
of garlic, roasted alongside the vegetables, become a self-contained
spread that is delicious on country-style bread. Be sure to allow one
garlic head for each person.

4 carrots, about ½ pound total
2 parsnips, about ½ pound total
2 turnips, about 1 pound total
1 rutabaga, about 1 pound
2 yellow onions, about ¾ pound total
3 russet potatoes, about 1 ¾ pounds total
4 heads of garlic, about ½ pound total
1/3 C olive oil
1 ½ tsps salt
1Tbles freshly ground pepper
4 fresh thyme sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh rosemary sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh sage sprigs, or 1 tsp dried

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Peel the carrots, parsnips, turnips and rutabaga. Cut the
carrots into 2 inch lengths. Halve the parsnips crosswise, separating
the tapering root end from the thick upper portion. Cut the upper
portion lengthwise into 2 pieces. Quarter the turnips and rutabaga.
Peel the onions but do not cut off the root ends. Quarter the onions
lengthwise.
Scrub the potatoes and cut them lengthwise into quarters, then
in half. Cut off the upper quarter of the garlic heads, leaving the
heads intact, skin and all.
Combine half of the olive oil, the salt, pepper, thyme,
rosemary and sage in a large bowl. Add all of the vegetables,
including the garlic. Stir them until they are well coated with the
seasoned oil.
Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on 2 baking sheets.
Roast for 30 minutes. Stir the vegetables and baste with some of the
remaining olive oil. Continue roasting, stirring once or twice and
basting with olive oil, for 30 to 45 minutes longer, or until all the
vegetables are tender and are easily pierced with a fork. Remove from
the oven and transfer to a platter.
Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 4
 

 

 

 

 

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Week #26 2017

Week #26

  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio
  • Kale
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Hot peppers
  • Sweet peppers
  • Stuffing peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Parsley or basil
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Grapes or apples.
  • Eggplant

We were surprised last week to find do many vegetables inspired by the rain. We had a few beans, cucumbers and zucchini and more tomatoes than we expected.  As I am writing this note I am somewhat guessing what we will find. Light rain and heat of last week may have ripened a few vegetables unexpectedly, thus what I write at 0530 may not be what you find in your harvest basket at 1330.

Still no broccoli! Odd as this may seem our plants are large and quite beautiful but on survey Friday I did not see one head. Both Broccoli and cauliflower are out there and should be coming in the next weeks. We have 3 more harvests after this week. We will surely have some of those fall favorites by then. The Brussels sprouts will get topped today, hopefully forcing some of them to form little heads on their stocks. If the tops of the plants look good we will given them to you as a special treat, like a tender collard green.

We did it! Your calls and emails and outrage over the attempts to end Obamacare worked. Once again we defeated them, but they are distracting us! The congress failed to approve the health center funding cliff and our community clinics funding is threatened. If they do not fix the cliff we may loose funding to care for over 9 million people. Call your representatives today!!

Earthquake Relief

We have good friends who live part time in Oaxaca and part time in Portland. Their home was not damaged in the earthquake and the >500 aftershocks, but they are traveling to southern Mexico in three weeks. They will be taking a truck full of supplies for victims of the earthquakes. This is where you come in! We are collecting new or old tents and tarps for them to take. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn.

Harvest Party

If you have not put this event on your calendar this is your opportunity! Sunday October 15 from 2-6 p.m. Be there or be square. See and print out the attached flyer and post on your fridge. You are welcome to bring family and friends and show off your farm. We plan to have cider pressing, pepper roasting, music , traditional Mexican dancing and more. I am busy making ceramic mugs and wreaths and bird feeders for sale.

Beef for Sale

Juvencio is preparing for his annual ground beef sale. We will be selling ground beef for $6/#. We would love you to buy in quantities of 10# or more.  Please send us an email with the quantity you want and your cell phone number and we will add you to the list. We expect to have the beef by the end of the month. It is beef raised on pasture and without antibiotics or hormones ever.

Thanksgiving Harvest

It is time to sign up for our Thanksgiving harvest November 19 and 20th. The additional veggies cost $40 and will include all sorts of goodies for your Thanksgiving table. We ask that you sign up and pre-pay for this vegetable extravaganza. We have spinach, lettuce and escarole planted and growing to make a delicious salad. We have large squash and pie pumpkins, leeks, shallots, onions and more. Trust us, by end of November you will miss your veggies!

CSA 2018 Season

Yes, it is time to let us know your intentions for 2018. This year is rapidly coming to an end. We are looking to the future, 2018 has to be a better year! We have already started planting for 2018, we have overwintering broccoli and cauliflower planted. We have shallots stored and we look forward to getting 5-6 greenhouses packed with delicious spring veggies for you and your family. Tell your friends and get signed up early for 2018.

Have a super week.

RADICCHIO SALAD WITH SPANISH BLUE CHEESE AND PEPPERED ALMONDS
1 head butter lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
1 head radicchio, torn into bite-size pieces
8 ounces blue cheese (preferably Cabrales), crumbled
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
5 tablespoons almond oil or olive oil
Peppered Almonds
Combine lettuce, radicchio and cheese in large bowl. Pour vinegar into small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Toss lettuce mixture with vinaigrette. Season salad with salt and pepper. Sprinkle Peppered Almonds over and serve immediately.

Bon Appétit
March 2000

Toro Bravo’s Radicchio Salad with Manchego Vinaigrette

By Genius Recipes

Austere as this salad may seem, it’s got 2 secret tricks that will make you better at making salads, during the holidays and forever after. 1. You infuse the vinegar with chopped red onion for an hour, then quietly remove it. The vinegar is left with a richer, more complex flavor, without the oppressive oniony kickback. 2. You toss the dressed leaves with a dusting of finely grated Manchego to help the coating stick. Adapted slightly from Toro Bravo: Stories. Recipes. No Bull. (McSweeney’s Insatiables, 2013).

Serves 4 to 8

  • 2 to 3 heads radicchio
  • 1/4 cup good-quality balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup good-quality sherry vinegar
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 3/4 cups olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cup Manchego, finely grated and divided
  • Salt, to taste
  1. Remove the cores from the radicchio and discard. Chop into 1-inch pieces. Take 1 gallon of water in a large bowl and add enough ice to make the water icy cold. Once cold, strain out the ice and add the radicchio to the water. Let it sit for 15 minutes to remove some of its bitterness, strain and then spin in a salad spinner until dry. Fluff the dried radicchio. (Note: If you don’t strain the ice out before adding the radicchio you’ll be pulling out ice pieces for half an hour so that you don’t have wet radicchio.)
  2. In a large bowl, add the balsamic vinegar, sherry vinegar, and chopped red onion. Break the onion up into pieces so that all of that oniony flavor gets into the vinegar. (Note: If you want to quick pickle and eat the onions themselves, Food52er hardlikearmour suggests adding the honey now too.) Let it sit for 1 hour and then strain out the onions.
  3. Add the honey and olive oil to the strained vinegars and whisk.
  4. Using your hands, toss the radicchio with the dressing until evenly coated. Add 1 cup of finely grated Manchego, salt, and toss again.
  5. To serve, top the salad in a serving bowl with the remaining 1/2 cup grated Manchego or distribute salad and Manchego among 4 to 8 bowls or plates.

 

 

 

 

Lentil and Sausage Soup with Kale

By Merrill Stubbs

Serves 6

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for browning the sausages
  • 1 tablespoon bacon fat (or add another tablespoon of olive oil)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 3/4 cups chopped celery
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • Salt
  • 1 1/2 cup french green lentils, rinsed
  • 28 ounces canned chopped tomatoes (I use tetra-pack)
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 4 chicken sausages (or substitute another kind of sausage)
  • 1 1/2 cup chopped kale
  1. Heat the olive oil and bacon fat over medium heat in a large, heavy pot and add the carrots, celery, onion and garlic. Add a big pinch of salt. Cook until softened, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the lentils, tomatoes and 4 cups water. Add the thyme and rosemary and a couple more pinches of salt. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat to a simmer. Cook until the lentils are tender, 15 to 20 minutes, adding more water if necessary to cover the vegetables.
  3. Meanwhile brown the sausages in about a teaspoon of olive oil in a small pan and then slice them into quarter moons.
  4. When the lentils are just tender, taste the soup and add more salt if necessary. Add the kale and cook for about 3 minutes, until the kale is tender but still green. Stir in the sausage, make sure everything is heated through, and serve.

Chickpea Stew with acorn squash, kale and toasted pecans

By reahpeah

A quick vegetarian supper. I saved time by microwaving the squash but would be even better roasted. It’s surprisingly tasty!

Serves 4-6

  • 1 Acorn Squash, cooked
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • dash mustard seeds, turmeric, cinnamon, chili flakes, madras curry powder
  • 1 cup kale, chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2 cups stock
  • 2 cups chickpea rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon toasted almond oil (or toasted sesame oil)
  • 2-3 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 2-3 tablespoons pecan halves, toasted
  1. Cook squash in microwave until soft (7-10 minutes). In a large pot on medium heat, add onions and spices, and cook until lightly browned. Add garlic.
  2. Add squash, kale and stock. Stew for 10-15 minutes covered. Puree with a hand immersion blender. Turn down to low and add chickpeas. Cook another 10-15 minutes until chickpeas are soften and kitchen smells good. Serve with plain yogurt and toasted pecans.

 

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Week #25

  • • Lettuce
    • Parsley or thyme or basil
    • Napa cabbage (sorry it didn’t show up last week, it was not ready when we went out to harvest)
    • radishes or beets (choose one or the other)
    • Kale or chard
    • Sweet peppers (red and green and yellow, enjoy them while you can)
    • tomatoes (very slow ripening due to the dramatic change in the weather)
    • winter squash (let the squash sit on the counter for a few weeks to months it will get sweeter and more delicious as it ages)
    • apples (good for eating and for sauce)
    • hot peppers
    • onions
    • garlic

The shift in the weather has really changed the landscape at the farm. The heat loving crops like tomatoes and eggplant, cucumbers and zucchini resent the cool nights that dip into the low 40s. They have all but stopped production and are setting flowers that are not likely to produce fruit. The rain was super for the fall crops like lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage, but they still seem to be a few weeks off. There was a horrible new pest we have not seen outside the greenhouse that was causing severe damage to many of our leafy crops that seems to have sent back into hiding with the rain. There are so many things we can not control, weather being one.

Juvencio went into action with the change in weather and pulled out the last of the melons. They have been so good this year. We now realize that many of you have purchased our melons but we did not give guidance on how to tell if they are ripe and sweet to eat. We are trying to give you the very best, but melons are a bit tricky and need to be very ripe, but not overripe to have them be superb. Here are some tips I found when searching on the internet, we use the smell as our guide and keeping them at room temperature for some time is helpful.

If picking a ripe melon feels like a completely daunting task, I can assure you that you’re not alone. Sometimes this choice feels more like a leap of faith, where you cross your fingers and hope for the best.
But there are ways to discover the sweetest, ripest, juiciest melons, and to pluck them from the heap.
Picking a good melon comes with challenges. It’s not like selecting berries where you can see green hints of unripeness. And it’s certainly not as easy as selecting a good peach or nectarine, where you can feel for juiciness, and smell the scent of perfect ripeness.
From now on, use these 5 tips to pick a ripe melon every time!
1. Inspect the melon for defects.
Your first order of business should be to inspect what the melon looks like. Does it have any bruising, soft spots or cracks? Choose a melon that’s not damaged on the outside. It should be free of bruises, soft spots, moldy patches and cracks.
2. Check the skin color.
When buying watermelon and honeydew, choose a melon with a dull looking appearance. A shiny outside is an indicator of an underripe melon. Also, honeydews should be pale yellow to light lemon in color, not overly green.
With melons such as cantaloupe and muskmelons, the rind underneath the net-like texture should be golden or orange in color. Avoid melons with an underlying green or white color.
→ Related: The Best Way to Pick a Watermelon
3. Size does matter.
Pick up a few melons and see how they feel. Choose a melon that’s heavy for its size.
4. Tap, tap, tap!
Have you ever tried the tapping test when buying a watermelon? It’s quite simple. Just tap the melon with the palm of your hand. If you hear a hollow sound, it’s passed the first test.
5. Don’t forget the smell test.
This works best with melons like cantaloupes and honeydew. Push your fingers on the round section where the vine was attached. It should be slightly soft and should smell fresh and fragrant with a hint of sweetness.

I have been busy filling in the greenhouses and space outside with fall and winter crops. I planted more lettuce, radicchio, escarole, kale, cilantro and beets in place of the melons and carrots. I will have more plants to go and more space to fill as we shift into the winter. The col crops (broccoli etc.) are looking good but seem like they are 1-3 weeks from being ready to harvest. We debute some radishes and beets today, again plagued by poor germination during the super hot spells there is not enough for everyone to enjoy it all, you will have to choose your favorite.

We have 4 more weeks of harvest remaining in the regular season. It is hard to believe the 2017 season is coming to an end. In some ways we are happy to see it go. It has been the hardest year of farming in our recent memory. So many difficulties with weather, germination, pests we questioned our knowledge and experience. The summer months were good, reminding us that, “yes we do know how to grow vegetables for 100 families”. The fall will be fairly good, but that remains to be seen. Our favorite Romanesco broccoli was a bust, it did not form heads at all. Half of the brussels sprouts are not going to produce and our amazing winter squash that looked so promising was stunted by the cucumber beetles. Alas, we are not sad to see 2017 end. The political storm and world weather tragedies as well as the constant threat of war make our struggles pale in comparison.

Message to self: “Enjoy what we have, cherish your loved ones, welcome those you don’t know and those who need a hand to join you at your table.”

Last but not least, remember the harvest festival on October 15 from 2-6. This is our last all farm event for the season and should be an enjoyable afternoon. It is an opportunity to for you to show your farm off to friends and neighbors, feel free to bring them along.

Here are some recipes to try:

Kale Salad With Apples and Cheddar Recipe – NYT Cooking
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013732-kale-salad-with-apples-and-cheddar?action=click&module=Collection%20Page%20Recipe%20Card&reg… 1/1
INGREDIENTS
4 cups very finely chopped or
slivered curly kale or Russian kale
(about 6 ounces on the stem, or half
of a 3/4-pound bunch, stemmed and
washed in two rinses of water)
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped
toasted almonds
1 apple, sweet, like a Fuji, or a sweettart,
like a Gala, Braeburn or Pink
Lady, cored and cut in 1/4-inch dice
1 ounce sharp Cheddar cheese, cut
in 1/4-inch dice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Salt to taste
1 very small garlic clove, puréed
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly grated
Parmesan
PREPARATION
Tip
Advance preparation: This salad benefits from tossing with the
dressing about 15 minutes before you serve it. The kale will soften in
the dressing.
By Martha Rose Shulman YIELD Serves four to six TIME 5 minutes
Kale Salad With Apples and Cheddar
Step 1
Combine the kale, almonds, apple and Cheddar in a large bowl.
Step 2
Whisk together the lemon juice, salt, garlic and olive oil. Add to the
salad, and toss well. Sprinkle the Parmesan over the top, and serve.

Crisp Kale Chips With Chile and Lime
Step 1
Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Make sure the kale is dry; if it is not, it
will steam rather than crisp in the oven.
Step 2
In a large bowl, toss kale pieces with olive oil and kosher salt; you may
need to do this in 2 batches. Massage the oil onto each kale piece until
the oil is evenly distributed and the kale glistens. Spread the kale out
on 2 17-by-12-inch jellyroll pans (or do this in batches). Bake the kale
chips until the leaves look crisp and crumble, about 12-16 minutes. If
they are not ready, bake for another 2 to 4 minutes.
Step 3
Remove from the oven and cool to room temperature. Sprinkle with
the lime zest, sea salt and chile powder to taste

Braised Kale
Step 1
Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, set
aside a large bowl of ice water. Add kale to boiling water, return to a
boil, and after 1 minute transfer to ice bath. Drain well, and set aside.
Step 2
In a large sauté pan, heat oil over low heat and sauté onion, carrot and
celery until just softened. Add sherry vinegar and cook until reduced
by two-thirds. Add kale and stir to coat, then add chicken broth,
honey, 2 teaspoons salt and the pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook,
partly covered, until kale is tender, 60 to 80 minutes.
Step 3
Transfer kale leaves to a warm bowl, leaving onion, carrot and celery
in broth. Strain broth, discarding solids. If there is more than * cup, it
may be boiled in a small saucepan until reduced. Adjust salt and
pepper as needed, and pour over kale. Serve immediately, or cover and
refrigerate for up to 24 hours; gently reheat before serving.

Curried Winter Squash Soup
Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

Serves 6-8

3 T unsalted butter
1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed
4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes
12 whole curry leaves (optional)
½ teaspoon ground allspice
¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
2 teaspoons curry powder
salt
freshly ground pepper
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture. Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg. Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes. Let cool slightly.
3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
4. Transfer the soup back to the pot. Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste. Return the soup to a simmer to heat through. Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

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Week #24 2017

Week #24
• Lettuce
• Napa cabbage
• Thyme or parsley
• Kale
• Winter squash
• Zucchini
• Cucumbers
• Tomatoes
• Cherry tomatoes
• Sweet peppers
• Hot peppers
• Onion
• Garlic
• Green beans
• Eggplant
• plums
The canning party was great success! It has never run so smoothly and we have never finished so early! I think it was thanks to amazing organization and direction from Mary Kay, Juvencio’s masterful assistance in every aspect and good planning. We had 24 participant families and we made 13 recipes and everyone went home with over 16 jars of goodies. We made plum cardamom jam, habanero (ghost too) carrot hot sauce, chipotle salsa, BBQ sauce, two chutneys, pickled peppers and much more. Many of us left with the canning bug and want to make more! Many first time canners commented on how much easier it was than they thought and want to try to make some of the recipes for themselves at home.
We are bracing for the rains. They are much needed as dust, ash and dead grass seem to dominate the landscape. Rain will help the fall crops like broccoli, cabbage and radicchio but will bring the end of tomatoes and squash. The fall shift is in the air as we wind down the last 6 weeks of the 2017 season. It is time to make salad, stews and soups. We are pulling out beds in the greenhouses and filling them with spinach, beets, radishes and other fall/winter crops.
We still need your help. There are 12 harvests left and we have few if any helpers signed up to lend a hand. Please do sign up and show up to help us Sunday or Wednesday mornings at 0700. The harvests take 3-5 hours depending on the number of helpers and the quantity of produce to harvest.
Our annual harvest festival is scheduled for October 15th and it promises to be a grand event. The party starts after our harvest that day. Please mark your calendars and bring your family to our October final event of the 2017 season. There will be a Thanksgiving harvest on November 19th/20th full of staples for your thanksgiving feast. I will have wreaths, ceramics, and other goodies for sale at both events. Time to place orders if you want something in particular. Otherwise take a look in the studio!
EGGPLANT, ZUCCHINI, RED PEPPER, AND PARMESAN TORTE
2 large onions (about 1 pound)
1 garlic clove
about 1/2 cup olive oil
a 26- to 32-ounce container chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
2 large eggplants (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
4 large zucchini (about 1 3/4 pounds total)
4 large red bell peppers
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup milk
1 cup heavy cream
3 large eggs
6 ounces freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (about 2 cups)
Halve onions through root end and thinly slice. Finely chop garlic. In a large heavy skillet cook onions with salt to taste in 2 tablespoons oil, covered, over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook mixture, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until any liquid onions give off is evaporated. Add tomatoes with juice, sage, and thyme and simmer, stirring occasionally, until excess liquid is evaporated and mixture is very thick. Season mixture with salt and pepper and cool. Preheat oven to 450°F. Brush at least 2 shallow baking pans with some remaining oil.
Cut eggplants crosswise into 1/3-inch-thick rounds and arrange in one layer in baking pans. Brush eggplant slices with some remaining oil and roast in upper and lower thirds of oven, switching position of pans halfway through roasting time, until tender and golden, about 20 minutes. Cool eggplant 5 minutes and transfer with a slotted spatula to paper towels to drain.
Cut zucchini lengthwise into 1/3-inch-thick slices and roast in same manner until tender and pale golden, about 25 minutes. Cool zucchini 5 minutes and transfer to paper towels to drain.
Quarter bell peppers lengthwise and discard stems, seeds, and ribs. Arrange peppers, skin sides up, in oiled baking pans and brush with some remaining oil. Roast peppers in same manner until tender and lightly browned, about 20 minutes. Cool peppers 5 minutes and transfer to paper towels to drain.
In a 1 1/2- to 2-quart heavy saucepan melt butter over moderately low heat and whisk in flour. Cook roux, whisking, 3 minutes and whisk in milk and cream. Bring mixture to a boil, whisking, and simmer, whisking occasionally, 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat and cool sauce 5 minutes. Whisk in eggs, two thirds Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt and pepper to taste.
Preheat oven to 400°F. and lightly oil a 14- x 10- x 2 1/2-inch or other 3 1/2-quart shallow baking dish. In baking dish arrange half of eggplant, overlapping slices to form an even layer, and season with salt and pepper. Top eggplant with half of tomato mixture, spreading evenly, and pour about one third Parmigiano-Reggiano custard over it. Nestle half of zucchini in custard and season with salt and pepper. Top zucchini with half of peppers. Repeat layering, reserving half of remaining custard for topping. Pour reserved custard over final layer of peppers and sprinkle with remaining grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.
Bake torte in middle of oven until custard is puffed and golden brown, about 35 minutes. Let torte stand 10 minutes before serving.

ASIAN NOODLE, MUSHROOM, AND CABBAGE SALAD
12 large dried shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon peanut oil
3 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
14 green onions; 12 halved lengthwise and cut on diagonal into 2-inch lengths, 2 chopped
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 1-pound package fresh thin Chinese egg noodles or one 12-ounce package dried Chinese egg noodles
1/3 cup oriental sesame oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
3 hard-boiled eggs; 2 thinly sliced, 1 chopped for garnish
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Place mushrooms in medium bowl; add enough boiling water to cover. Let stand until mushrooms soften, about 45 minutes. Drain mushrooms. Cut off stems and discard; thinly slice caps.
Heat peanut oil in heavy large wok or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add cabbage, ginger, garlic, and mushrooms. Stir-fry until cabbage wilts, about 2 minutes. Add 2-inch green onion pieces; toss until green tops begin to wilt, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat. Mix in 1 tablespoon soy sauce.
Cook noodles in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite. Drain well; place in large bowl. Whisk sesame oil, next 3 ingredients, and 2 tablespoons soy sauce in small bowl. Add to noodles. Add sliced eggs, 3/4 cup cilantro, and cabbage mixture; toss to blend well. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead) Cover and chill, tossing occasionally.
Sprinkle salad with 2 chopped green onions, chopped egg, and remaining 1/4 cup cilantro and serve.
Bon Appétit
July 2002
NAPA CABBAGE SALAD
Printed from COOKS.COM

Napa cabbage
Green onions
Butter
Slivered almonds
Sesame seeds
Ramen noodles
Oil
Sugar
Vinegar
Soy sauce
Break up 1 head Napa cabbage.
Saute 1/2 cup butter, 1/2 cup slivered almonds, 1/2 cup sesame seed, 2 packages Ramen noodles (crushed) and 10 green onions. Combine with cabbage.
DRESSING:
1 c. oil
1 c. sugar
1/2 c. vinegar
2 tbsp. soy sauce
Toss and serve.

Chicken Hash with Butternut Squash and Kale

Here’s a new way to serve up nutritious veggies with protein-packed chicken. It’s tender, flavorful and simple to make. Basically a perfect meal!
This dish is great for meal prep, as it holds up well for several days in the fridge and can be easily packed in Tupperware to eat on-the-go. Enjoy!
Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com
Servings: 6
Here’s what you need
• 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into large pieces
• 1 bunch curly kale, stemmed and roughly chopped
• 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 2” pieces
• sea salt and black pepper
• 1 Tablespoon olive oil
• 1 red onion, sliced
• 1 Tablespoon fresh sage, minced
• ½ cup chicken broth
• ¼ teaspoon liquid stevia
• 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
Instructions
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the butternut squash pieces and blanch for 3 minutes, until almost cooked through.
2. Remove from heat and stir in the chopped kale. Let stand, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Drain the pot and set the veggies aside.
3. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Return the emptied pot to medium-high heat and sauté the chicken with the olive oil, until browned on all sides.
4. Add the onions and sauté for 2 minutes. Mix in the butternut squash and kale mixture and sage. Sauté for another 2 minutes.
5. In a small bowl combine the broth, stevia and Dijon. Pour over the hash and simmer until the liquid is reduced. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!
Nutritional Analysis
217 calories, 2g fat, 12g carbohydrate, 3g sugar, 208mg sodium, 2g fiber, and 24g protein.

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Week #23 2017

Week #23
• Asian pears
• Apples
• Plums
• Tomatoes
• Cherry tomatoes
• Winter squash (spaghetti)
• Kale
• Green Beans
• Eggplant
• Onions
• Garlic
• Sweet peppers
• Parsley
• Thai basil
• Zucchini
• Cucumbers
• Tomatillos
With storms and fires and earthquakes as well as political idiocy with the repeal of executive order DACA the news of our farm seems miniscule. Alas, with the turmoil around us we must give thanks to what we have TODAY. We have ash covered vegetables grown with care, we have friends and family and a community that has chosen to be together, gathering around seasonal, organic produce and the desire to know where our food is grown. Thank you to everyone for supporting us and this community and for choosing us to grow the food you feed your families.
Thank you also for your communication back to us about the farm and our ups and downs. I am sorry if my words of frustration made people feel unwelcome at the farm. We want you and your family to enjoy the place we have created. We will work together to make sure crops are safe from animals and people are safe from animals and we can all enjoy a little bit of farm life.
One of two signature events at La Finquita will take place next Saturday, September 16. The annual canning party is back and should be a great one! We will have a whole line up of recipes to work thru and some for all participants to take home. If you have signed up, even on the waitlist you are expected to be at the farm at 0900 (as close to that time as you can). If you missed out you may contact me by text or email and let me know you want to be on the waitlist and can check on Saturday to see if there is room. If you can arrive early I can always use an extra hand. Please see the “what to bring” attachment in your email. I will also have extra copies in the barn and you can take a copy or take a picture of the list. PLEASE BE SURE TO BRING AT LEAST ONE BOX OF HALF PINT JARS, as most of the recipes call for half pints. Also bring a dish to share as canning is hungry business and we have to eat to keep working!
The next event, our annual HARVEST FESTIVAL, is set for October 15th (a Sunday), mark your calendars and invite your friends, this is an event not to be missed. “Mexico en la piel” is confirmed, the Helvetia Alp Horns are invited. Our very own blue grass players are set and we may have marimba if we are lucky. If you want to perform or have a suggestion, please contact me immediately as I would love to include you.
A bit of political activism: please contact your MOC (member of congress) about the importance of passing legislation to make The Dream Act a reality.
Here are some recipes for this week:

Spaghetti Squash and Herbs (Martha Stewart)

• 1 spaghetti squash (about 4 pounds), halved lengthwise, seeds removed
• 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
• 1 tablespoon packed light-brown sugar
• Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
• 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (about 2 1/2 ounces)
• 1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
• 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
• 1/4 cup blanched hazelnuts (1 ounce), toasted and coarsley chopped
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Brush cut sides of squash with oil, and sprinkle with sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Place squash, cut sides down, on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes. Let cool slightly on sheet on a wire rack, about 10 minutes.
2. Scrape squash with a fork to remove flesh in long strands. Place in a large bowl. Add oil, Parmesan, parsley, cilantro, hazelnuts, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Toss, and serve immediately

Ratatouille’s Ratatouille
As envisioned by Smitten Kitchen
v1/2 onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, very thinly sliced
1 cup tomato puree (such as Pomi)
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 small eggplant (my store sells these “Italian Eggplant” that are less than half the size of regular ones; it worked perfectly)
1 smallish zucchini
1 smallish yellow squash
1 longish red bell pepper
Few sprigs fresh thyme
Salt and pepper
Few tablespoons soft goat cheese, for serving
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Pour tomato puree into bottom of an oval baking dish, approximately 10 inches across the long way. Drop the sliced garlic cloves and chopped onion into the sauce, stir in one tablespoon of the olive oil and season the sauce generously with salt and pepper.
Trim the ends off the eggplant, zucchini and yellow squash. As carefully as you can, trim the ends off the red pepper and remove the core, leaving the edges intact, like a tube.
On a mandoline, adjustable-blade slicer or with a very sharp knife, cut the eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash and red pepper into very thin slices, approximately 1/16-inch thick.
Atop the tomato sauce, arrange slices of prepared vegetables concentrically from the outer edge to the inside of the baking dish, overlapping so just a smidgen of each flat surface is visible, alternating vegetables. You may have a handful leftover that do not fit.
Drizzle the remaining tablespoon olive oil over the vegetables and season them generously with salt and pepper. Remove the leaves from the thyme sprigs with your fingertips, running them down the stem. Sprinkle the fresh thyme over the dish.
Cover dish with a piece of parchment paper cut to fit inside. (Tricky, I know, but the hardest thing about this.)
Bake for approximately 45 to 55 minutes, until vegetables have released their liquid and are clearly cooked, but with some structure left so they are not totally limp. They should not be brown at the edges, and you should see that the tomato sauce is bubbling up around them.
Serve with a dab of soft goat cheese on top, alone, or with some crusty French bread, atop polenta, couscous, or your choice of grain.

Monsieur Henny’s Eggplant Gratin
(from Patricia Wells’ At Home in
Provence)

2 Tbs olive oil
3 small (approx. 5 oz each) eggplants, or 1-2 larger ones
3 Tbs finely minced herbs, preferably rosemary, sage, thyme, basil
pinch dried oregano
salt to taste
1/2 c. grated parmesan cheese
2 lbs fresh tomatoes, cored and halved cross-wise

Preheat oven to 450.
Drizzle 1 Tbs of oil over bottom of 2 Qt gratin dish.
Slice the eggplants in half lengthwise (or in thirds if larger),
lightly score cut surface with a sharp knife, and place skin side
down in dish in a single layer.
Sprinkle with the herbs, salt, then with 1/2 the cheese.
Place the tomatoes cutside down in a single layer on top, brush with
remaining oil, and sprinkle with cheese.
Bake until veggies are very soft, almost falling apart, approx. 1
hour.

FRITTATA OF GREENS
New York Times, Martha Rose Schulman
INGREDIENTS
• 4 eggs
• 1 tablespoon milk
• Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
• ½ to ¾ cup finely chopped blanched spinach, chard, kale or beet greens (to taste)
• 1 garlic clove, minced or pureed
• 1 tablespoon, tightly packed, freshly grated Parmesan
• 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil

Nutritional Information
o
PREPARATION
1. Beat the eggs and milk in a bowl with salt and pepper to taste. Beat in the greens, garlic and the Parmesan.
Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a heavy, 8-inch nonstick omelet pan. Drop a bit of egg into the pan and if it sizzles and cooks at once, the pan is ready. Pour in the egg mixture, scraping in every last bit with a heat-proof rubber spatula. Swirl the pan to distribute the eggs and filling evenly over the surface. Shake the pan gently, tilting it slightly with one hand while lifting up the edges of the frittata with the spatula in your other hand, to let the eggs run underneath during the first few minutes of cooking. Once a few layers of egg have cooked during the first couple of minutes of cooking, turn the heat down to low, cover and cook 7 to 10 minutes, until the frittata is puffed and just about set. From time to time remove the lid and loosen the bottom of the omelet with a wooden or heat-proof rubber spatula, tilting the pan, so that the bottom doesn’t burn. It will however turn golden.
2. If the frittata is still runny on the top, wearing oven mitts, slide the frittata out onto a plate or even better, a saucepan lid that has a handle, reverse the pan over the plate or lid, and holding the two together, flip the plate or lid so that the frittata goes back into the pan on its not-quite-cooked side. Finish for no longer than a minute, then reverse onto a platter. Allow to cool to room temperature, and serve, or chill. Cut into 4 wedges to serve. The wedges pack well and are very portable.
Have you cooked this? Mark as Cooked
Tip
• Advance preparation: The blanched greens will keep for 3 or 4 days in the refrigerator and can be frozen. The frittata will keep for about 3 days in the refrigerator.

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Week #22 2017

• Tomatoes
• Cherry tomatoes
• Sweet peppers
• Hot peppers
• Green beans
• Winter squash
• Summer squash
• Cucumbers
• Onions
• Garlic
• potatoes
• Plums
• Basil
• Thyme
• Kale
Luna and I are back from our trip to Homer Alaska. We had a great time with Jacob as he toured us around his new community. He seems to be thriving in the cool Alaska climate. He is working with the University, studying salmon habitat. He spends the majority of his time outside, doing field work, which suits him just fine. Luna and I had the opportunity to participate in water sampling while he measured flow and depth of streams where salmon spawn. We saw eagles, Sandhill cranes, salmon running, whales, sea otters and more. We took an all day fishing trip to catch the “big one” (halibut) but got 6 small ones instead.
The farm is surviving the heat with some damage from record setting temperatures. The greenhouses are super hot and frankly unbearable. The cucurbits (zucchini and cucumbers) have taken the heat very hard and have pretty much stopped producing. Later this week when it cools off we will be turning over the crops and getting fall lettuce, spinach and radicchio planted in place of the wilted vines of dead cucumbers.
I surveyed the damage from the goat and horse and the fall Brussels Sprouts were half eaten. My fall flowers were destroyed and the remaining lettuce consumed. I am saddened by the damage, but as Juvencio says, “It could have been worse”. The farm rules have been changed. I have sent them out attached to the weekly newsletter email. Basically there will be no more visiting the animals. You are welcome to view them through fences, but no one is permitted to enter the fenced areas.
The fall crops will be affected by all of this late summer mess. Terrible heat, crop damage by animals and seeding failure (mainly due to the heat, things did not germinate!!). We hope for some delicious crops to offer , but this year has been and challenge all the way through! We look forward to a fun filled canning party and Harvest festival. Here are the dates to remember:
1) September 16 (Saturday) Canning party – full now, but you can still be added to the wait list
2) October 15 – Harvest Festival (Sunday) – from 2 – 6 p.m.
3) October 22 – 27 – last week of the 2017 season
4) November 19 – Thanksgiving Harvest add on $40 ( more details to come)
We have both Beef and Pork for sale. Please text Juvencio for details or look under here http://finquita.com/wordpress/?page_id=435 .
Sorry for the late posting our internet was acting up this morning!
Here are some recipes to enjoy:
Kale and Lentil Soup
(Marilyn’s invention from Sue)
3 T EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)
1 onion and 1 rib of celery (chopped and sauté for 4 minutes)
6-7 cups of water
2 cups chicken broth
1 ½ cups green lentils (rinsed and checked)
1 bay leaf
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
½ – 1 # kale (washed and sliced)
12 oz. Kielbasa (slice in 1” rounds)
16 oz. plum tomatoes
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste
Sauté onion and celery for 4 minutes. Add water and chicken broth as well as lentils to the sauté mix. Add the bay leaf and red pepper flakes and bring to a boil. Decrease heat to a simmer for 30 minutes. Then add the Kale, kielbasa sausage, tomatoes and red wine vinegar. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 15 minutes more and serve. Great the next day.
Marinated Cherry Tomatoes 4 servings
2 baskets Cherry tomatoes, cut in half
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup Finely chopped parsley
1 Tablespoon Finely chopped rosemary
3 Garlic cloves, minced
1/3 cup Extra-virgin olive oil
3 Tablespoons Balsamic vinegar
Salt & freshly ground black pepper to taste
Mix tomatoes, onions, parsley, rosemary, garlic, olive oil and vinegar in a shallow bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Cover the bowl and let tomatoes marinate at room temperature at least 1 hour, but preferably 3 to 4 hours or overnight. Stir occasionally. Enjoy with crostini or as a side dish.
Cherry Tomato & Avocado Salad
1 basket cherry tomatoes, halved
2 Tablespoons chopped scallion or other mild onion
1 cup (approx.) chopped avocado
2 tablespoons chopped herb (such as parsley, cilantro, dill….)
optional vinaigrette to coat (whirl 2 T lemon juice or vinegar, 1 small clove garlic, 1 t mustard, pinch salt and pepper, with 1/2 cup olive oil in blender.) Gently mix all ingredients. Serve. (The avocado is optional but delicious)
Gazpacho
By Beth
1 1/2 pounds tomatoes (4-6 depending on size)
1 cucumber
1 onion
3 cloves garlic, minced

Dice above ingredients and combine in a bowl

Add the following:
3 cups tomato juice
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper to taste

Use an immersion blender or food processor and blend to taste (chunky or smooth)

Serve cold for the hot weather!

a
Indian Spiced Kale and Chickpeas

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced
1 11/2 pounds kale, ribs removed, coarsely chopped 1 cup reduced sodium chicken broth
1 teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon garam masala ¼ teaspoon salt
1 can (15 oz.) chick peas, rinsed

Healt oil in a dutch oven over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add kale and cook, tossing with two large spoons, until bright green, about 1 minute. Add broth, spices and salt. Cover and cook for about 8-10 minutes. Stir in chickpeas; cover and cook unitl chickpeas are heated through, about 1-2 minutes.
Eggplant and Tomato Gratin
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN
This is a delicious, low-fat version of eggplant Parmesan. Instead of breaded, fried eggplant, though, the eggplant in this dish is roasted and sliced, layered with a rich tomato sauce and freshly grated Parmesan, and baked in a hot oven until bubbly.
For the tomato sauce:
1. 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2. 1 small or 1/2 medium onion, chopped
3. 2 to 4 garlic cloves (to taste)
4. 2 pounds fresh tomatoes, quartered if you have a food mill or else peeled, seeded and chopped; or 1 1/2 (28-ounce) cans chopped tomatoes, with juice
5. Salt and freshly ground pepper
6. 1/8 teaspoon sugar
7. 2 sprigs fresh basil
8. For the gratin:
9. 2 pounds eggplant, roasted
10. Salt and freshly ground pepper
11. 2 tablespoons slivered fresh basil leaves
12. 2/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan
13. 1/4 cup bread crumbs
14. 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1. Roast the eggplant.
2. Meanwhile, to make the tomato sauce, heat the olive oil in a large, heavy, preferably nonstick skillet over medium heat, and add the onion. Stir until tender, about five to eight minutes, then add the garlic. Stir until fragrant, about a minute, and add the tomatoes, salt (1/2 to 1 teaspoon), pepper, sugar and basil sprigs. Turn the heat up to medium-high. When the tomatoes are bubbling, stir well and then turn the heat back to medium. Stir often, until the tomatoes have cooked down and are beginning to stick to the pan, about 25 minutes. Remove the basil sprigs.
3. If you did not peel the tomatoes, put the sauce through the fine blade of a food mill. If the tomatoes were peeled, pulse the sauce in a food processor fitted with the steel blade until coarsely pureed. Taste and adjust seasoning.
4. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Set aside 1/4 cup of the Parmesan and mix with the bread crumbs. Oil the inside of a two-quart gratin or baking dish with olive oil. Spread 1/2 cup tomato sauce over the bottom of the dish. Slice the roasted eggplant about 1/4 inch thick, and set an even layer of slices over the tomato sauce. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon a layer of sauce over the eggplant, and sprinkle with basil and Parmesan. Repeat the layers one or two more times, depending on the shape of your dish and the size of your eggplant slices, ending with a layer of sauce topped with the Parmesan and bread crumb mixture you set aside. Drizzle one tablespoon of olive oil over the top. Place in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until bubbling and browned on the top and edges. Remove from the heat and allow to sit for at least 10 minutes before serving. Serve hot, warm or room temperature.
Yield: Serves six
Advance preparation: The tomato sauce can be made up to three days ahead. The casserole can be assembled a day ahead, covered and refrigerated, then baked when you wish to serve it. Don’t add the last layer of bread crumbs and Parmesan, with the drizzle of olive oil, until right before you bake it.

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Week #20 2017

Week #20
• Lettuce
• Carrots
• Celery (wow, haven’t seen this in a long time, might be quite strong may need to use it in cooking)
• Eggplant
• Sweet red peppers
• Hot peppers
• Cucumbers
• Beans or zucchini
• Tomatoes
• Cherry tomatoes
• Apples
• Onions
• Basil
• Garlic
• You pick black berries
Happy Eclipse! The farm is buzzing with all our guests visiting from far and wide. We had friends arrive all day yesterday, two sets from Santa Cruz and another set from Boston. We will have more stop in after the eclipse. We also celebrated with my father last night in honor of his 90th birthday. It was so great to see him enjoying some of his favorite foods (stuffed peppers and carne adobado) among good friends.
We are still busy getting farm tasks done, so much to do and so little time. Juve worked hard to harvest potatoes and onions and prepare beds for fall planting. I have my work cut out for me this week as I scurry to get the plants in the ground before Luna and I head north to Alaska at the end of the week to visit Jacob in Homer. We are beginning the long process of turning over the hoop houses from summer to fall and winter. We are fighting pests as we go. The stripped cucumber beetles took out a whole row of winter squash in less than a day. Honestly the plants had over 100 bugs on each leave. It was a festival to beat all festivals of bugs mating and eating leaves. The plants look like skeletons. They hit the beans as well and dropped production as there are no leaves to nourish the plants.
The Brussels sprouts are growing nicely but they too are being attached by cabbage moths and aphids. The flea beetles are also out there turning every remaining leaf into lace. Oh, did I forget the attack from below – gophers and ground squirrels are tunneling the garden, eating carrots and potatoes and roots of brassicas.
News about the canning party. I had to change the date to September 16(Saturday) instead of 17(Sunday). I am so sorry but Mary Kay, my right hand woman and master of canning can not attend on Sunday. I vowed several years ago (2012 to be exact) never to try and put on the canning party alone again. That was a horrible year. Jacob had just left for college, Juvencio took off to McMinnville, Mary Kay was away and I was left to organized, set up etc. all alone. We ran out of canning jars and I volunteered to go to Fred Meyers to get more canning jars and I just went and cried. So, I am not doing the canning party without Mary Kay. Sorry for messing up other people’s plans but this is the new date: September 16. The list is full and the waiting list is brimming. Please do let me know if you can not make the change to the new date.
We got together this Thursday and planned out the list of recipes we will attempt. We are making some old favorites and trying some new ones. It should be lots of fun! I have emailed a list of what to bring. I need more outdoor stoves so if you have one and a gas tank please let me know.
I need to get moving to harvest and get ready to host the eclipse party. Here are some great recipes:
The Best Grilled Chicken:
For the Brine
4 quarts cold water
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt

5 1/2 to 6 pounds chicken parts with skin and bones
1/4 cup fresh lime juice plus 4 limes, halved crosswise
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
1 large garlic clove, minced
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
1 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes
1/2 cup vegetable oil

Brine the chicken (the longer the better – but 1 hour is better than nothing). Then grill the chicken. Take the remaining ingredients and chop them and then blenderize them until smooth. Once the chicken is grilled pour the sauce over it and serve. Good cold as well.
Becca’s favorite Thai Cumber salad with Roasted Peanuts

¼ cup fresh limejuice
1 ½ tablespoons fish sauce (nam pla)
1 ½ tablespoons sugar
1 ½ tablespoons minced seeded jalapeno chili (about 1 large)
2 garlic cloves
1 ½ English hothouse cucumbers, halved, seeded, thinly sliced
¾ cups sliced red onion
2 tablespoons fresh mint
3 tablespoons coarsely chopped lightly salted roasted peanuts

Whisk first 5 ingredients in medium bowl. Place cucumbers, onion, and mint in large bowl. Add dressing and toss to coat. Season salad to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle on peanuts and serve.

Imam Bayildi (Stuffed Eggplant) (family favorite)
Posted on July 28, 2015 by Pumpkin Ridge Gardens
2/3 cup olive oil
3 medium eggplants
Salt and pepper
2 onions
4 garlic cloves
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 Lb tomatoes, chopped
1 Tbs dried oregano
½ tsp sugar (optional)
3 Tbs chopped parsley
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Slice eggplant in half lengthwise and, using a large frying pan, fry in batches in 1/3 cup olive oil, until brown on both sides (10 -15 minutes). Blot off excess oil with paper towels. Arrange on shallow baking dish and season with salt and pepper. Heat the remaining olive oil in a sauce pan, sauté onions until they start to color. Add garlic and cumin, fry for 2-3 minutes then add tomatoes, oregano and sugar (if desired). Pour in 2/3 cup water and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook for 15 minutes. Stir in parsley and divide stuffing into 6 equal portions. Pile the stuffing on each eggplant half. Pour 2/3 cup boiling water into the baking dish and cook in oven for 45 minutes. Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 6. Adapted from Easy Vegan.
Celery, Tomato, and Basil Salad
4 large tomatoes, sliced crosswise OR 1 clamshell mixed cherry tomatoes cut in half, or a mix
3-4 small purple onions or 1/2 larger onion sliced crosswise
4 stalks celery with leaves, thinly sliced crosswise, leaves torn
Small handful fresh basil, torn
1/4 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons champagne or sherry vinegar
3 tablespoons heavy cream
S & P to taste
In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, onion, celery, celery leaves and basil; set aside.
In another bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, and cream; to combine.
Season with salt and pepper. Pour over salad and toss to coat; serve immediately.

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