Week #11

 

  • Lettuce – keep eating your salads, we are growing your lettuce!!
  • Chinese broccoli – likely the last week of this amazing powerhouse! We have had 10 weeks of the delicious, nutritious, vitamin filled green.
  • Fennel – my sister’s favorite, add to salads, eat raw, see recipes below
  • Beets – likely the last for a few weeks
  • Sugar snap peas – enjoy them while you can they are nearing the end, the indoor beds are done and these are our only sugar snaps outside. We are racing the red winged blackbirds for these favorite spring time treats
  • Potatoes – we hope you are enjoying the purple and pink early potatoes! We enjoy them pan cooked, oven roasted or sliced thin and baked in the oven
  • Green onions
  • Garlic – fresh out of the ground and not yet cured, but nice flavor
  • Fava beans – the last of these difficult to prepare but oh-so-worth-it beans.
  • Zucchini and other summer squash – it might be time to make zucchini bread, some of those fellas got awfully large this week.
  • Cucumbers – just a few, but hopefully all will get one this week, they are coming!!
  • Kale – try a kale salad this week??

The work never ends for the farmer and this could not be truer this week. With the summer solstice and light until 9:45 we have been out there weeding and weeding until we can’t see the weeds from the cultivar. We managed to get almost all the onions weeded, just in time for the days to get shorter. Onions are generally very sensitive to this change and go from making the green part to sending energy into making the bulb quite abruptly. Take a look out at the field from the barn and you will see the sea of dark green erect onion leaves. Soon you will see the bulbs plumping up (if we can keep them weeded!).

We pruned tomatoes, added additional strings to keep them climbing. Juvencio created the largest trellis known to farmers to encourage our pole beans to climb, we will need only the super tall to help us harvest them, so consider signing up to help harvest in mid July if you are over 5’ 11”! The peppers in the hoop house are flowering and the ones in the field have been liberated from their forest of weeds. Juvencio managed to pull all the sugar snap peas from both hoop houses and turn over the beds. I came home from the farmer’s market and planted all the melons. We hope for a repeat of last year’s melon success, but alas farming is a gamble and melons are a luxury.

The cucumbers are coming!! The plants are growing and flowering like mad, I feel impending doom when I think about how many beds I planted. I just kept on planting as they did not seem to be growing and now the thought of harvesting all those hundreds of cukes is seeming daunting. Make sure to sign up to help harvest we are going to need your hands to get all that produce in. Think about when you can come and lend a hand. We would like all that can to help us harvest twice each season. We start harvest at 7:00 am and work until the job is done. That is usually 11 or 12 and really depends on the crop and who is there to help us.

Upcoming events:

1) TBA – Meet the Chef event – Lani, co-owner and chef from NOBULL will be at the farm sampling her delicious food concentrate that makes cooking at home with veggies easy.

2) August 25th – canning party

3) October 14th – Harvest Festival

Please consider staying engaged politically. So much is going on in this country that is absolutely not what our country stands for. Remaining silent is not an option, it supports the oppressor and never defends the oppressed. There are many ways to stay active and make a small difference every day. Call your member of congress, they need to hear what you are thinking, they need to be appreciated for what they are doing right (Merkeley going to Texas and raising awareness of separation of children from their families) and what they are doing wrong (cutting medicare, Medicaid, funding a border wall, etc. etc.). There are rallies all over the nation next Saturday June 30th. Find out about the one in Portland at:

https://act.moveon.org/event/families-belong-together_attend1/search/

Have a great week! Consider buying flowers they make your house bright, bring a smile to a friend and are all around nice! Here are some recipes to help you enjoy eating veggies every day.

Chicken Salad with Fennel, Almonds, and lemon Mayo

Ingredients

¼             cup mayonnaise

~             Juice of 1 small lemon

2              cups cooked chicken (grilled, roasted, or poached), cut or torn into bite-size pieces

½             cup fennel bulb and fronds (not stalks), diced

1              medium shallot, diced

¾             cup almonds, toasted and sliced

~             Salt and pepper to taste

~             Mixed salad greens, washed and dried

Steps

Put the mayonnaise in a medium bowl, then whisk in the lemon juice to taste (I like it lemony, so I err on the side of more rather than less lemon juice). Stir in the chicken, fennel, shallot, and almonds, then season to taste with salt and fresh ground pepper

Toast 1 slice per sandwich of artisanal-style whole-wheat bread. Top toasted bread slices with chicken salad and mixed greens.

Fennel Salad

Make 4 servings

Preparation time: about 20 minutes.

NOTE: The amounts are all approximate and flexible. This is a very improvisational recipe.

Ingredients

1 small head organic butter (Boston) lettuce, cleaned and spun dry

1 medium-sized bulb organic fennel, sliced paper thin (a mandolin works best.)

2 organic navel oranges, peeled and sliced into thin rounds

15 oil-cured or Kalamata olives, pitted and sliced

5 or 6 organic dried figs, cut into small pieces

1 – 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon organic lemon juice, plus more to taste if you like

1/2 cup blanched, slivered almonds, lightly toasted (optional)

Directions

  1. Wash and dry the lettuce, then tear it into bite sized pieces into a large salad bowl. Add the fennel, oranges, olives, and figs, and toss.
  2. Drizzle the salad with the olive oil, and toss until everything is lightly but thoroughly coated. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, if you like, and toss again. Refrigerate until serving (but not longer than about 1 hour).
  3. Just before serving drizzle in about 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice and sprinkle in — or top with —the almonds and cheese shavings, if you like. Toss quickly but thoroughly, and serve right away.

 

Beets with Fennel (My version as I couldn’t find the book I got the delicious recipe from)

 

1 bunch beets (steamed, leave 1” of tops and the whole root on, steam and then peel)

1 fennel bulb cut in quarters and then slice thinly

1 sweet onion, chopped finely

Toasted walnuts, about 1 cup

2 tablespoons of chopped parsley

 

Vinaigrette

4 T extra virgin olive oil (is there any other kind?!)

1 teaspoon walnut oil (I used sesame)

1 T, plus a dash more Champagne vinegar

Salt and pepper

 

Mix cooked beets, onion, fennel and walnuts together, add parsley and toss with vinaigrette.  Chill or serve warm, we loved it.

Chinese Scallion Pancakes
recipe by Elsa Chen

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups flour, plus more for flouring the rolling surface
1 cup water
2 teaspoons oil
A bunch of green onions, green and white parts, chopped medium-fine

A few tablespoons of oil to brush on pancakes (a mix of canola or corn oil and sesame oil is good) some salt A few tablespoons sesame seeds (optional)

Directions:
Mix together the first three ingredients by hand or in a food processor. Flour a surface and knead the dough. Let it rest for 20-30 minutes before continuing.
With a rolling pin, roll the dough out on a well-floured surface into a big, flat square or rectangle 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
Brush the pancake with a bit of oil, and sprinkle with spring onion pieces and a little salt. Starting at one short end, roll up the dough tightly, jelly-roll style, so you have a “snake.”
Cut the “snake” crosswise into 8 – 10 pieces. Then flatten each piece again gently with your palm and rolling pin to make a little rectangle. Don’t flatten it too firmly, because you want a little air to remain trapped between the layers of the pancakes so they’ll puff up a bit between the layers and be lighter.
Press one or both sides in sesame seeds (optional).
Heat a tablespoon or two of oil in a large skillet. Shallow fry the pancakes until both sides are golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels.
Serve plain or with dipping sauce. An easy sauce can be made by mixing soy sauce with a little minced garlic, scallion, and rice vinegar.

Green Onion Pancake by Stella Fong

2 cups flour
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/2 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 to 1/2 cup cold water
vegetable oil spray
1/2 cup minced green onions
Mix together flour and boiling water. Add 1/3 cup cold water and knead until dough is smooth and elastic. Add more water if necessary. Cover and let dough rest for about 15 minutes. In a small bowl, combine sesame oil, salt and green onions. Set aside. Divide dough into 10 pieces. Flatten each piece in the palm of your hand. Then roll out into a 6-inch circle. Spread each piece with the green onion mixture.
Roll up dough into a jellyroll. Then wind up into a snail shape. Flatten slightly; roll on lightly floured surface to 5-inch circle. Spray pan with vegetable oil spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Fry pancake until golden brown, about 2 minutes, turn and cook other side. Serve hot. Makes 10 pancakes

 

 

 

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Week #10 2018

  • Lettuce
  • kohlrabi
  • Chinese broccoli
  • summer squash
  • herb- cilantro, dill or parsley
  • sugar snap peas
  • fava beans! They are here for a brief moment and then gone, read tips below on how to use them.
  • beets – probably the last for a while
  • potatoes
  • fennel- a great addition to salads
  • green onions
  • fresh garlic
We celebrated Diego this week as he graduated from PSU in Biology. He surprised us earlier this spring with the news that he could graduate ahead of schedule. We are so proud of him and his accomplishments. As we wind down the graduation season we look to congratualte all the fathers out there. Today is your day for recognition and appreciation. This is something that should be done daily, but is often taken for granted. Enjoy your day, watch the World Cup, taste some BBQ or whatever your family tradition is – you deserve it!
This week on the farm we managed to get ahead on some tasks and fall behind on others. We weeded onions and tied tomatoes. More weeds and more tomatoes got ahead of us. Our sugar snap peas in the hoop houses gave us their all and are done. As we move on to summer crops in the hoop houses we will focus on those that can tolerate heat.
We seeded the fall broccoli and cauliflower in hopes that it will be ready for transplanting in July. We wait for the cucumbers to really come on as they start to flower robustly. The heat of this coming week and even today may help or hurt depending if it can stay in the high 80s and not the high 90s.
The canning party will go forward. It will be scaled back as I will be missing the expert help of Mary Kay. Believe it or not I usually set the schedule for the season in April and this year I delayed. As it turns out Mary Kay and I do not have overlapping schedules this year so I will go forth alone. I have chosen August 25th as the day to put up for the winter. More details to follow, but let me know that you are interested and committed to that date. It is an all day event so plan accordingly.
The harvest festival date is also set, October 14th ( a Sunday) from 2-6 p.m. Mark your calendars and plan on celebrating with us at La Finquita. In the mean time there is plenty of work to get done here on the farm. Please do sign up to help us harvest at least twice over the course of the season if you are able. The sign up sheet is in the barn waiting for you to schedule your participation.
If this is your first time dealing with Fava Beans here is a link: https://www.epicurious.com/ingredients/how-to-prepare-fava-beans-gallery/list to help you prepare them.
Here are some recipes for you to enjoy:
Fava Bean “Ful”
Lebanese bean dish
INGREDIENTS NEEDED:
1 can of fava beans -drained
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 cloves of crushed garlic
¼ cup of olive oil
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
1 finely chopped tomato
1 green onion thinly sliced
PERPERATION:
In pan sauté garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil until the garlic is lightly golden. Add the drained fava beans and bring to a boil and simmer on low. Then add the lemon, salt and pepper and mix while trying to mash at least half the fava beans. Turn heat off and remove from oven.
Place the cooked fava beans in a serving dish.
Garnish the beans with parsley, tomato, green onions and the re remaining olive oil. Serve with pita bread and a plate filled a Varity of fresh vegetables of your choose.
FAVA BEAN Salad
Ingredients
4 cups shucked fresh fava beans
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 pound Manchego cheese, shaved thinly (or Asiago or Romano)
2 tablespoons finely chopped flatleaf parsley
Directions
Fill a bowl with ice and water. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the fava beans and cook until just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and shock in ice water. Drain again and remove outer skins. Place the beans in a medium serving bowl. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, garlic and olive oil and whisk until blended. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour the mixture over the beans and mix well. Add the cheese, sprinkle with the parsley and serve.
GARLIC AND DILL FAVA BEAN SALAD (BAGULA)
Cumin and lemon bring a smoky and tart savoriness to this classic Egyptian bean dish.
Todd Coleman
Cumin and lemon bring a smoky and tart savoriness to this classic Egyptian bean dish from Aladdin’s Castle Cafe in Portland, Oregon. This recipe first appeared in our June/July 2012 issue along with Dana Bowen’s story Food of the People.
SERVES 4-6
Ingredients
1 lb. small dried fava beans, soaked overnight
1⁄4 cup olive oil
3 tbsp. minced parsley
3 tbsp.s minced dill
1 tsp. ground cumin
4 cloves garlic, mashed into a paste
Juice of 1 lemon
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions
Drain beans and place in a 4-qt. saucepan, cover with water by 2″, and bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, covered and stirring occasionally, until tender, about 50 minutes.
Drain beans, and transfer to a bowl; add oil, parsley, dill, cumin, garlic, juice, and salt and pepper; let sit for 30 minutes to meld flavors before serving.
New Potatoes with garlic and parsley
READY IN: 38mins SERVES: 4
UNITS: US
INGREDIENTS Nutrition
12 small red potatoes
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
3 teaspoons lite olive oil (divided)
salt and pepper
DIRECTIONS
Scrub the potatoes well.
Pare a 3/4″ strip around the middle of each potato (this is just to give you a little contrast in color).
Place potatoes in a saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil.
Simmer covered for about 20 minutes or until tender.
Drain potatoes and place them in a bowl add two teaspoons of oil& toss.
In a non stick frypan add the remaining oil over medium heat.
Add garlic,cook approximately 1 minute.
Add parsley, salt& pepper, mix well.
Add potatoes, reduce heat to low and cook stirring constantly for 1 or 2 minutes.
Serve

Braised whole-pod fava beans with dill

 

Fava beans are a culinary highlight of spring, but double shelling them takes time.  Very young favas though can be eaten pod and all.

 

Prep time and cook time:  45 minutes

Makes six servings

1/3 cup olive oil

1 sweet onion, halved and thinly sliced

1 ½ pounds fava bean pods, ends trimmed and strings removed

¾ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar

¼ cup dill, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish

Plain whole-milk or greek style yogurt

 

  1. Put oil and onion in a large pot over medium-high heat.  Cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Add favas, salt, sugar, and ¼ cup water. Bring to a simmer.  Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, 20 minutes.

Add ¼ cup dill, cover and cook until fava pods are tender and starting to fall apart, about 10 minutes.  Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon dill and serve warm or at room temperature with yogurt on the side.

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Week #9 2018

Week #9

  • Lettuce!! – It just keeps coming! Enjoy butterhead, romaine, red oakleaf (Rutilai) and amazing green oakleaf (Kiribati). Try some NOBULL sesame salad dressing (Remember to order your scratch starters concentrates from nobullsf.com )
  • Sugar snap peas! Enjoy them while you can, the indoor beds have peaked and we are moving on to outdoor bed.
  • Beets – there are so many ways to enjoy them, roasted, boiled, in borsht!
  • Chinese broccoli – it just keeps on going, simply sauté the whole stock, leaves, stem and flower with a little garlic and soy sauce, so delicious, so nutritious!
  • Kale – a mainstay for every week as you strive to eat your greens every day.
  • Parsley, dill or cilantro – you choose the herb for your week
  • New potatoes are here!! – pink and purple, so sweet and so colorful. I love to slice them with my wave cutter (look it up!). I then lay them on an oiled baking sheet, add salt and pepper and sometimes paprika, and bake at 350 for 20 – 30 minutes.
  • Kohlrabi is back!! – peel it and slice it and enjoy it raw, or see recipes from Sue
  • Summer squash – Enjoy this summer delight sautéed with shitaki mushrooms and garlic.
  • Green garlic – these are the first heads of garlic to be pulled, they can be used now or left to dry a bit. You will get plenty more so we encourage you to peel each clove and enjoy the slightly milder flavor of fresh garlic.

This has been a busy week! Not as much farming as one would like, between Luna’s award ceremony on Tuesday, graduation on Thursday and grad party last night we have been spending late nights with high school friends and family. We feel so so lucky and proud of our daughter as she launches into the next phase of life. We are so thrilled to have Jacob home from Alaska to join us in the festivities.

This week attention turns to Diego who graduates from PSU on Friday! He has to get through 3 finals first and then he will be a graduate in Biology. We are so proud of him as he finishes school and looks on to what life has to hold.

The farm looks beautiful as Juvencio has spent the week pruning, weed whacking and mowing. There are many unplanted beds in greenhouses calling my name! There are tomatoes to be pruned and onion beds to weed. Hopefully I will be able to sneak in some very early mornings and get these things done between having fun with my family. The winter squash, Brussel sprouts, okra and more need to get in the ground. We are never finished planting on the farm until late October, so I need to keep focus!

We will see if we manage to harvest our garlic this week with the help of Jacob. It is a big job involving lots of sweat and pulling. This rain may be helpful or may be hurtful as we race to get the garlic out before the rust kills all the green leaves on the garlic and my ornamental wheat. Wheat rust is a fungal infection affecting all grasses of which garlic and onions are susceptible. It gets us every year and is in the soil and blown by the wind. Alas the rain makes it grow better.

Every fall I offer a chance to learn how to can vegetables and fruit. This is super fun, super time consuming and a lot of work on the front end to pull it off.  We get together on a Saturday and harvest the veg and fruit and then work together in groups of 2-4 to make 12 or so recipes. Everyone gets to work and take home some of what is created. So, here is the deal with the canning party – The only time we can manage to pull it off this year will be the very end of August or Labor Day weekend. Mary Kay, my right hand woman will not be able to help me this year so I need a group of very committed people to do this. If this is you, I need to hear from you and I need to know you won’t waver. I am looking at 8/23 or 8/30. I need to hear from you so email me if you are in. If you are not interested, no worries we can skip a year. If there is support I will forge ahead.

Off to harvest. Enjoy your veggies!

Kohlrabi, apple and beetroot salad

Serve this salad together with a hearty veg tart or a roasted chicken or fish. Serves 4-6

Method

Peel the kohlrabi, cut in half and slice thinly. Core the apples and slice to the same thickness. Peel the beetroot and grate coarsely on a cheese grater or shred on a mandolin.
Mix together all the vegetables in a large bowl, then add the rest of the ingredients. Stir well, taste and season – you can afford to be generous with the salt. Pile up on a serving plate and garnish with extra chopped coriander (Cilantro to you and I)

Kohlrabi and gorgonzola gratin

The juiciness of kohlrabi gives this a much fresher taste than other gratins, yet it’s every bit as rich and comforting. A bitter rocket, watercress and red onion salad is an ideal match. Serves six.

1 tbsp sunflower oil
1 medium onion, peeled and thinly sliced
300ml vegetable stock
300ml double cream
1½ tsp Dijon mustard
30g parmesan, grated
1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed
8 large sage leaves, finely chopped
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 medium-large kohlrabi, peeled and cut into 2-3mm-thick rounds
60g gorgonzola, broken into 1cm pieces
30g panko breadcrumbs

Heat the oven to 200C/390F/gas mark 6. Put the oil in a medium saucepan on a medium-high heat, add the onion and sweat for eight minutes, stirring often, until soft and golden. Add the stock, cream, mustard, parmesan, garlic, sage and a good grind of black pepper. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for four minutes, so the liquid thickens slightly, then take off the heat and set aside.

Spread out the kohlrabi slices on a large board, sprinkle with three-quarters of a teaspoon of salt, then layer them in a large 26cm x 28cm ovenproof dish or casserole pan, slightly overlapping the slices as you go – you should have enough to form about five layers. Pour over the cream and onion mix, making sure a good proportion of the onion and herbs are nicely spread on the top layer of kohlrabi, dot the gorgonzola on top and sprinkle breadcrumbs all over the surface.

Bake for an hour, until the cream has thickened and the top is golden-brown – check the kohlrabi is cooked by inserting a sharp knife: it should easily cut through the layers. Remove, leave to settle for five to 10 minutes, then serve.

Kale and Swiss chard tart

Yotam Ottolenghi’s kale and swiss chard tart: ‘Fantastically delectable and rich.’ Photograph: Johanna Parkin for the Guardian. Food styling: Maud Eden

Don’t be put off by any healthy, virtuous images that may come to mind when you see the name of this dish. This green tart is fantastically delectable and rich. Use spinach instead of chard, if you prefer or can’t find any chard. Serves six to eight.

250g shortcrust pastry
A little plain flour, for dusting
200g kale, roughly chopped
200g Swiss chard, stalks discarded and leaves roughly chopped 
2 tbsp olive oil, plus 2 tsp for brushing
30g unsalted butter
1 medium onion, peeled and roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
20g picked tarragon leaves
20g picked mint leaves
30g picked parsley leaves, roughly chopped
40g fresh white breadcrumbs (roughly what you get from a slice of crustless bread)
½ tsp freshly ground nutmeg
100ml double cream
2 eggs, lightly whisked
40g pine nuts, toasted
100g mature cheddar, roughly grated
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Greek yoghurt, to serve

Heat the oven to 170C/335F/gas mark 3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the pastry to about 3mm thick, then transfer to a 24cm round quiche or flan tin. Trim, leaving about 5mm of pastry hanging over the edge of the tin, in case it shrinks during cooking. Prick the base of the pastry all over with a fork, and chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. Line the pastry case with baking parchment, then fill with baking beans and bake for 30 minutes. Carefully lift out the paper and beans, and bake for 10 minutes more, until the pastry is golden-brown, then remove and leave to cool.

Put a large pan of water on to boil. Once the water is bubbling, add the kale and chard, cook for four minutes, then drain and set aside to cool. Transfer the greens to a clean tea towel and squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

Put a medium frying pan on a medium-high heat with the oil and butter. Once the butter has melted, add the onion and fry for six minutes, stirring a few times, until soft and golden-brown. Add the garlic and cook for two minutes, then tip the lot into a food processor. Add the cooked greens and fresh herbs, pulse for 20 seconds, to make a rough green paste and then put in a large bowl. Add the breadcrumbs, nutmeg, cream, eggs, pine nuts, cheddar, half a teaspoon salt and a good grind of black pepper. Mix well, then spoon into the tart shell, spreading it out evenly, then bake for 25-30 minutes, until just set.

Remove and brush with the remaining oil. Leave to cool slightly – for about 10 minutes – and serve.

greens to a clean tea towel and squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

Put a medium frying pan on a medium-high heat with the oil and butter. Once the butter has melted, add the onion and fry for six minutes, stirring a few times, until soft and golden-brown. Add the garlic and cook for two minutes, then tip the lot into a food processor. Add the cooked greens and fresh herbs, pulse for 20 seconds, to make a rough green paste and then put in a large bowl. Add the breadcrumbs, nutmeg, cream, eggs, pine nuts, cheddar, half a teaspoon salt and a good grind of black pepper. Mix well, then spoon into the tart shell, spreading it out evenly, then bake for 25-30 minutes, until just set.

Remove and brush with the remaining oil. Leave to cool slightly – for about 10 minutes – and serve.

 

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Week #8

Week #8

  • Lettuce – enjoy those salads!
  • Beets or carrots
  • Sugar snap peas – eat the whole pod, enjoy fresh and sautéed
  • Kale or chard
  • Chinese broccoli – eat the stems, flowers, leaves, so delicious
  • Green onions – the most nutritious of the onion family. I chop them up and add them to hamburger meat.
  • Sugar snap peas!! Garden candy, more to come
  • Dill or parsley or cilantro – herbs are the spice of life! Add them to your hamburger meat too.
  • Summer Squash!! – we have green zucchini, yellow and green called “Zephyr”, patty pan and heirloom variety called “Costata Romanesco”, it sure feels like summer is here. We had poor germination of the green variety so it was planted late and is being attached by you know who (the cucumber beetles).
  • Spinach is back! This is the last week and then not again until fall. Make Saag, see recipe below.

The weeds have taken off! We have planted almost the entire farm. There are 4 beds that are waiting for the first transplanting of the season and there are many that are moving on to the second transplanting of the season. As lettuce, carrots, beets are coming out cucurbits (cucumbers, melons) and potatoes are going in. I still have 50# of potatoes to get planted! I have vowed to have Brussels sprouts in early October and they are ready to be transplanted!! The garlic is almost ready to be harvested and the favas look close to harvest as well.

We will burn the candle at both ends this week as we weed, prune tomatoes, transplant and compost. We have graduation festivities almost every night this week from awards night Tuesday, to graduation on Thursday to grad party on Saturday. We are so happy for Luna! Diego is next week as we help him celebrate his B.S. degree in biology. We are so excited Jacob will be home from Homer Alaska to help us celebrate.

I will make this quick as the morning has gotten away from me again. Here are some recipes for this week:

Braised Lentils with Spinach

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1-1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 1 small onions, diced
  • 1 medium carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 stalk celery, trimmed and diced
  • 1 bay leaves
  • Salt
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock or canned reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups finely shredded fresh spinach, thoroughly washed and drained

Preparation

    1. Pour enough cold water over the lentils, onions, carrots, celery, and bay leaves in a 3-quart saucepan to cover by three fingers. Season with salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Adjust the heat so the water is at a gentle boil and cook until the lentils are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, discard the bay leaves, and transfer to a large skillet.
    2. Pour in the chicken stock and olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cook until the liquid is reduced enough to coat the lentils, about 3 minutes. Scatter the spinach over the lentils and toss just until the spinach is wilted, about 1 minute. Taste and add salt and pepper if necessary. Serve immediately.

Notes

    1. I didn’t use chicken stock, but instead cooked ¾ lbs boneless, skinless chicken in the pan (with herbs) then deglazed the pan with white wine and added the lentils.
    2. I used all of the spinach stalks instead of the greens which turned out really well.

 

 

Roasted Beets w/ Feta

 

Directions

Peel 4 medium beets and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste on a baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring once or twice, until tender, 35 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; toss with 4 chopped scallions and 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Top with crumbled feta.

 

Asian Style Grilled Tofu with Greens

 

Use tatsoi, mizuna, pea shoots, spinach or bok choi for the greens

 

Dressing:

1 small carrot, chopped

½ cup prepared carrot juice

2 tablespoons white or yellow miso

2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar

1 tablespoon canola oil (I would use olive oil)

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped ginger

½ teaspoon chopped garlic

 

Tofu and Greens

2 14 ounce firm tofu

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons canola oil

2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

1 tablespoon black bean past

2 teaspoons minced garlic

10 ounces Asian greens or baby spinach

 

  1. To prepare dressing:  combine carrot, carrot juice, miso, vinegar, oil ginger and garlic in a blender or food processor; blend until smooth.  Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
  2.  preheat grill to medium
  3. To prepare tofu:  Slice each tofu block crosswise into 5 slices; pat dry with paper towels.  Combine honey, oil, soy, black bean paste, garlic in a small bowl.  Spread half the marinade in a large baking dish and top with tofu slices.  Spread the remaining marinade over the tofu to cover completely.
  4. Oil the grill rack.  Grill the tofu until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes per side.  To serve toss greens with the dressing.  Divide among 6 plates and top with tofu.

 

Sugar Snap Peas with shallots and Thyme

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 pound sugar snap peas
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallots
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • kosher salt to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
  2. Spread sugar snap peas in a single layer on a medium baking sheet, and brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with shallots, thyme, and kosher salt.
  3. Bake 6 to 8 minutes in the preheated oven, until tender but firm.

 

Kohlrabi Slaw

Salad:
1 1/4 lbs kohlrabi, peeled and coarsely shredded
2 large carrots, peeled and coarsely shredded
1/2 sweet red pepper, seeded and diced
1/2 c. chopped scallions, including green

Dressing:
2 T oil, pref olive oil
2 T vinegar (I used white wine vinegar)
2 t or more fresh snipped dill
1 t sugar (I used 1/4 t)
1/2 t ea. cumin and mustard powder
1/4 t crumbled tarragon
1/4 t ea. salt and pepper
1/3 c plain yoghurt

Toss salad ingredients in a bowl. In a separate bowl, blend oil and vinegar, then blend in other ingredients. Pour over salad, toss, cover and refrigerate for about 2 hrs before serving.
Serves 6

 

Roasted Beets and Braised Beet tops with Canellini Beans(serves 4)

 

2 bunches medium beets with tops

1 medium red onion, cut into thin (1/4 – inch) wedges

water

3 T extra virgin olive oil

2 T red wine vinegar

1 t dried oregano or 2 t fresh oregano leaves, minced

½ t Kosher salt

½ t minced garlic

Freshly ground pepper

1  15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cut green tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch of stem attached.  Set greens aside to be used fro Braising Beet tops.

 

Wash beets and dry.  Wrap each bet tightly in a square of foil and roast until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 1 hour or more, depending on size.  Cool, unwrap foil and rub off outside skin.  Trim and discard stems and ends, and cut beets into ½ inch wedges.  Set aside separately until ready to serve.  Strain any juices left in foil into a small bowl and reserve.

Place onion wedges in a small bowl and cover with cold water.  Add a handful of ice cubes and let stand until ready to use. To make Braised Beet Tops, wash beet tops in several changes of water, trim stems and coarsely chop leaves into 2 inch pieces.  There should be about 8 cups, or 1 pound, lightly packed.  Heat 2 cups water to boiling in a large, broad saucepan.  Stir in beet greens and cook until wilted and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.  Drain well, cool and then press lightly on greens with back of spoon to remove excess moisture.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, reserved beet juices, oregano, garlic, and salt and pepper to taste until well blended.  Measure out 1 Tablespoon and add it to the beet wedges.  Toss to combine.

Remove ice cubes and drain water from onion.  Add onion to dressing along with cooked beet greens and beans.  Toss gently to blend.  Spoon into a serving bowl and arrange beet wedges around edges and on top.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

 

 

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Week #7 2018

  • Head Lettuce – up to three heads per share!!
  • BEETS !!! we are so excited they are here, eat the beet, eat the greens – this is two for one.
  • Garlic scapes (curls) a spring time favorite – this is the start of the flower of the garlic, see recipes below or just throw them on the grill with olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Kale or chard
  • Kohlrabi – like the broccoli stem, super sweet, make a slaw or peel and eat raw
  • Chinese broccoli – eat the stems, flowers, leaves, so delicious
  • Green onions – the most nutritious of the onion family. I chop them up and add them to hamburger meat.
  • Sugar snap peas!! Garden candy, more to come
  • Carrots – wow are these delicious veggies hard to grow! Enjoy them as who knows when we will get them to grow again.
  • Dill or parsley or cilantro – herbs are the spice of life! Add them to your hamburger meat too.
  • Summer Squash!! – we have green zucchini, yellow and green called “Zephyr”, patty pan and heirloom variety called “Costata Romanesco”, it sure feels like summer is here
  • Spinach is back! We expect 1-2 more weeks of spinach and then not again until fall. Make Saag, see recipe below.

WOW, the veggies are ON! It is time to cook at home, eat veggies with every meal and say thank you to Mother Nature for her bounty. I will be super short as I have to rush out to get started on this massive harvest. As you can see we need your help. If you are able, please do sign up to help harvest. We harvest Sunday and Wednesday mornings from 7:30 ish to 11:30 ish. We love for you to come for the whole harvest so we can get it done together. Kids are welcome but need a dedicated adult to supervise their work.

We have been crazy busy as usual trying to get the plants into the ground and keep up with the weeds! We planted the peppers, the heirloom tomatoes, the leeks (thank goodness I am done with aliums!!), the celery, the red cabbage, more lettuce, more green onions, more cucumbers, more potatoes, the list goes on! We hope for a great summer and are so excited to report our greenhouse tomatoes have tons of flowers and have been pruned and strung up.

Juve weeded and weeded, beating back thistle (ugh!) and pig weed. He has even been attacking the weeds in my perennial flower garden with his friend “Vincentico”. This is the name is gives to his Kenyan hoe given to him by Vincent our great friend who moved back to Africa last fall. We sure miss him. He would come out once a week and work on weeding along side Juvencio. He was the only one who could work like Juve.

We have beef! Available in the barn for purchase. Time to make burgers on the grill and use up all the herbs, green onions.

Please consider getting some NOBULL seasoning for your veggies. This amazing concentrated flavor booster is made locally by Lani and is all veggie based. I have emailed you information and all you need to do is contact me and I will find a way to get it delivered to the us here at La Finquita. You keep the concentrate in your freezer and add a teaspoon or tablespoon to your soup or veggie. Here are examples of how to use it: use it as a rub, in burgers, in meatballs, to season fish, in seasoned eggs, as a glaze for vegetables! It is super tasty and she has many easy 5 ingredient recipes to share with you. This is a great way to eat simply at home.

We have tomato starts! I have tons of tomato starts ready to put in the ground. I have basil starts and more. Text me or email me and I can set them aside for you. $3/plant (discount from farmers market pricing). lynjuve@msn.com.

Also, I have fresh cut flowers available for purchase, just $6 gets you a beautiful bouquet that brightens your home and lasts all week. Consider making someones day, Buy a bouquet!

Enough said off to harvest!

Lamb Saag

  • 4 lamb shanks
  • 2-3 Lbs. spinach
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 Tbs. ghee (or butter and oil mixed)
  • 1 tsp. brown mustard seed
  • 1/8 tsp. asafetida
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne
  • ½ tsp. ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. grated nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 3 Tbs. water
  • 3 Tbs. cream (or use sour cream or yogurt)
  • 2 tsp. salt

Cover lamb shanks with water in a large pot.  Add 1 tsp. salt and bring to a boil.  Simmer until the lamb is starting to loosen from the bone.  If you have time, put boiled lamb shanks onto the grill to brown.  Chop lamb and set aside.

Meanwhile, wash spinach and strip leaves off of stems.  Chop coarsely.  Combine cayenne, coriander, black pepper, nutmeg, turmeric and cumin in a small bowl, add water, and stir well.  Melt the butter and oil (or ghee) in a 5-quart pan over moderate heat.  Add mustard seed and cook until it starts to pop.  Add asafetida and let it sizzle, then add spice mixture and onion.  Fry for about 2 minutes.

Add spinach to pan, sprinkle with 1 tsp. salt.  Cover and reduce heat.  Stir occasionally until spinach is all bright green and very wilted.  Add water if necessary.  At this point, the saag can be removed from heat and can sit if necessary.  Before serving, put spinach in a food processor and puree.  Return it to the pan, add chopped lamb, stir in cream and reheat briefly.

Adapted from The Best of Lord Krishna’s Cuisine by Yamuna Devi.

Spring Onion Sandwiches
from Chez Panisse Vegetables by Alice Waters

Onion Sandwiches were an old favorite of James Beard’s. These are best made in may when onions are very sweet. Trim the crusts off thin slices of good white bread. Spread two slices of bread with mayonnaise, on one side. Slice fresh onion very thinly and make a layer of onion slices on one slice of bread. Top that with the other slice of bread. Dip the four side edges of the sandwich into thin mayonnaise and then into chopped parsley.

from Marcella, a CSA member:

One of our favorite ways to enjoy scallions is as a vegetable side dish.

Scallions and Carrots

1 bunch scallions, roots trimmed and white part cut into a 4″ length
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into sticks
1 T olive oil
1 T butter
1/4 t sugar
2 T soy sauce

Saute the scallions in the olive oil for 3 minutes. Add the carrots and continue to cook until vegetables begin to soften and turn golden. Add butter, soy sauce and sugar and cook 30 seconds more.

Milanese-Style Chard
from Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Shepherd and Raboff

1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 Tablespoons olive oil
2 stalks green garlic, chopped
6 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup chopped basil
pinch nutmeg
1/4 cup chopped prosciutto or ham
2 Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese
salt and pepper to taste

garnish: toasted pine nuts or walnuts

Trim the chard, discarding tough stems, and coarsely chop.

In a large, deep skillet, heat olive oil, add garlic and scallions and saute until softened and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add chard, parsley, basil, nutmeg, prosciutto or ham and mix well together. Cover the skillet and cook over medium heat until tender and wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Mix in Parmesan Cheese and then add salt and pepper to taste. Serve garnished with pine nuts or walnuts.

Chinese Scallion Pancakes
recipe by Elsa Chen

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups flour, plus more for flouring the rolling surface
1 cup water
2 teaspoons oil
A bunch of green onions, green and white parts, chopped medium-fine

A few tablespoons of oil to brush on pancakes (a mix of canola or corn oil and sesame oil is good) some salt A few tablespoons sesame seeds (optional)

Directions:
Mix together the first three ingredients by hand or in a food processor. Flour a surface and knead the dough. Let it rest for 20-30 minutes before continuing.
With a rolling pin, roll the dough out on a well-floured surface into a big, flat square or rectangle 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
Brush the pancake with a bit of oil, and sprinkle with spring onion pieces and a little salt. Starting at one short end, roll up the dough tightly, jelly-roll style, so you have a “snake.”
Cut the “snake” crosswise into 8 – 10 pieces. Then flatten each piece again gently with your palm and rolling pin to make a little rectangle. Don’t flatten it too firmly, because you want a little air to remain trapped between the layers of the pancakes so they’ll puff up a bit between the layers and be lighter.
Press one or both sides in sesame seeds (optional).
Heat a tablespoon or two of oil in a large skillet. Shallow fry the pancakes until both sides are golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels.
Serve plain or with dipping sauce. An easy sauce can be made by mixing soy sauce with a little minced garlic, scallion, and rice vinegar.

Green Onion Pancake by Stella Fong

2 cups flour
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/2 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 to 1/2 cup cold water
vegetable oil spray
1/2 cup minced green onions
Mix together flour and boiling water. Add 1/3 cup cold water and knead until dough is smooth and elastic. Add more water if necessary. Cover and let dough rest for about 15 minutes. In a small bowl, combine sesame oil, salt and green onions. Set aside. Divide dough into 10 pieces. Flatten each piece in the palm of your hand. Then roll out into a 6-inch circle. Spread each piece with the green onion mixture.
Roll up dough into a jellyroll. Then wind up into a snail shape. Flatten slightly; roll on lightly floured surface to 5-inch circle. Spray pan with vegetable oil spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Fry pancake until golden brown, about 2 minutes, turn and cook other side. Serve hot. Makes 10 pancakes

SCALLION AND ANISE PITA TOASTS

Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 scallion, minced
1/4 teaspoon aniseed, crushed
two 6-inch pita loaves, halved horizontally

Preheat broiler.

In a small saucepan, heat butter over moderate heat until foam subsides. Add scallion and aniseed and
cook, stirring until scallion is slightly softened. Arrange pita halves, rough sides up, on a baking sheet
and brush with butter mixture. Season pita halves with salt and pepper. Broil pita halves about 4
inches from heat 30 seconds, or until golden. Transfer pita toasts to a cutting board and immediately
cut each into 6 wedges.

Makes 24 toasts. Gourmet February 1995

TUNA DIP WITH LEMON AND CAPERS

two 6-ounce cans solid white tuna packed in oil, drained well
a 10 1/4-ounce package soft tofu, drained
3 scallions, minced
1 carrot, shredded fine
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
2 tablespoons drained capers, chopped
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Accompaniment: crackers or assorted crudites

In a bowl stir tuna with a fork until finely flaked. In another bowl whisk tofu until smooth. Stir tofu
and remaining ingredients into tuna until combined and season with salt and pepper. Serve dip with
crackers or crudites.

Makes about 3 cups. Gourmet July 1995 The Last Touch

CARROT SCALLION FRITTERS

3/4 cup coarsely grated carrot
1/2 cup thinly sliced scallion
1 large egg, beaten lightly
1/3 cup fine dry bread crumbs
vegetable oil for deep-frying

In a bowl combine well the carrot, the scallion, the egg, the bread crumbs, and salt and pepper to
taste. In a large skillet heat 1 inch of the oil until it registers 375¡F. on a deep-fat thermometer, in
batches drop the carrot mixture into the oil by tablespoons, and fry the fritters for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes,
or until they are golden. Transfer the fritters to paper towels and let them drain. Serve the fritters as
hors d’ oeuvres or as a side dish.

Makes about 10 fritters. Gourmet November 1990

SCALLION GOAT CHEESE MUFFINS

1 cup whole milk
4 ounces soft mild goat cheese
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1 bunch scallions

Preheat oven to 400¡F. and butter twelve 1/3-cup muffin cups.

In a small bowl stir together 2 tablespoons milk and goat cheese until combined. Into a bowl sift
together flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Melt butter and in another small bowl whisk together
with remaining milk and egg. Finely chop enough scallions to measure 1 cup. Stir butter mixture and
scallions into flour mixture until just combined. Divide half of batter evenly among muffin cups and
top each with about 2 teaspoons goat cheese filling. Divide remaining batter over filling. Bake muffins
in middle of oven until golden and a tester comes out clean, about 20 minutes.

Makes 12 muffins. Gourmet

Lydias Ladybug

ORZO PILAF WITH GREEN ONIONS AND PARMESAN CHEESE

3 1/4 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
1 pound orzo (rice-shaped pasta)
5 green onions, thinly sliced
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Bring 3 1/4 cups broth to boil in heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat. Mix in orzo and simmer uncovered until just tender but still firm to bite and some broth still remains, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes.
Remove from heat. Add green onions and cheese and stir to blend. Season pilaf to taste with salt and pepper. Rewarm over low heat, if necessary, and mix in more broth by 1/4 cupfuls if pilaf is dry. Transfer pilaf to large bowl and serve.
Serves 6.
Bon Appétit
April 1999

simple beet salad with onions

grate scrubbed beets or cut into julienne: toss with chopped green onions and a vinaigrette you make or from a bottle in your fridge. Add toasted nuts and/or a sharp cheese (blue, parmesan, feta). Serve alone or with lettuce.


GREEN ONION DROP BISCUITS,
Cooking Light, NOVEMBER 1996

Tips: Use a food processor to combine dry ingredients and shortening. Pulse a few times until the mixture is the size of peas. If you don’t have buttermilk, you can substitute plain yogurt.

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons vegetable shortening
1/4 cup finely chopped green onions
1 cup low-fat buttermilk
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 400°.
Combine first 4 ingredients in a large bowl; cut in shortening with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in green onions. Add buttermilk, stirring just until flour mixture is moist.

Drop batter by heaping tablespoons onto a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until lightly browned.

Yield: 16 servings (serving size: 1 biscuit)

QUINOA CHOWDER WITH SPINACH, FETA CHEESE AND GREEN ONIONS, Cooking Light, DECEMBER 1999

8 cups water
3/4 cup uncooked quinoa
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 tablespoons finely chopped seeded jalapeño pepper
1 garlic clove, minced
2 1/2 cups diced peeled baking potato (about 1 pound)
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2/3 cup thinly sliced green onions, divided
3 cups thinly sliced spinach
1 cup (4 ounces) crumbled feta cheese
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation
Combine water and quinoa in a Dutch oven; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Drain in a sieve over a bowl, reserving cooking liquid; add enough water to cooking liquid to measure 6 cups. Set quinoa aside.
Heat oil in pan over medium heat. Add jalapeño and garlic; cook 30 seconds.
Stir in potato, salt, cumin, and black pepper; cook 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in 6 cups cooking liquid, quinoa, and 1/3 cup onions; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until potato is tender.
Stir in 1/3 cup onions and spinach; cook 3 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese and cilantro.

Yield
8 servings (serving size: 1 1/4 cups)

Chili Cottage Cheese Dip from Too Many Tomatoes, Squash, Beans, and Other Good Things A cookbook for when your garden explodes by L. Landau and L. Myers

1 pint small curd cottage cheese
2-4 chili peppers (jalapeños or wax peppers, the waxes this week are spicier…), peeled and chopped (you can roast or blanch them to peel them, or not peel them at all… -Julia)
2 tomatoes, peeled and diced
3 scallions, including tops, chopped
1 teaspoon salt or less to taste
½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (or soy sauce to make it completely vegetarian: worch. sauce has a bit of fish in it….)

Mix. Chill for 3 hours. (Julia’s note: I admit I’ve not made this, but when I try it I will play with the pulse feature of my food processor…)

MINCED LAMB WITH GINGER, HOISIN AND GREEN ONIONS

Serve this quick stir-fry with rice.

2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 pound ground lamb
1 tablespoon oriental sesame oil
2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
1 tablespoon minced orange peel
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/4 cup hoisin sauce
Butter lettuce leaves

Combine orange juice and cornstarch in small bowl. SautŽ lamb in heavy large skillet over high heat until cooked through, breaking up with back of spoon, about 5 minutes. Pour lamb with its juices into colander; drain. Heat oil in same skillet over high heat. Add ginger, garlic and orange peel; stir-fry 30 seconds. Add green onions 30 seconds. Add hoisin sauce and lamb to skillet; stir until blended. Add orange juice mixture; stir until thickened, about 1 minute. Spoon into lettuce leaves.

Serves 4. Bon Appetit April 1994

VEGETARIAN SUSHI

4 to 8 lettuce leaves
3 ounces somen (thin Japanese wheat noodles)*

1/2 cup matchstick-size strips carrots
1/2 cup matchstick-size strips green onion
1/2 cup matchstick-size strips red bell pepper (can be left out)
Fresh cilantro leaves

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon chili paste with garlic*
1 teaspoon sugar

*Thin Japanese wheat noodles and chili paste with garlic are available at Asian markets, specialty foods stores, and in the Asian section of some supermarkets.

Pat lettuce leaves dry. Put water to boil. Add noodles and cook until tender, about 2 minutes. Drain. Refresh under cold water and drain.

Arrange 4 lettuce leaves on work surface. Place additional leaves on each arranged leaf if needed to form 8-inch length. Place 1/4 cup noodles along 1 long side of each leaf forming 1-inch-wide strip. Arrange carrots atop noodles, then green onion, bell pepper and cilantro leaves. Starting from 1 long side, roll leaf over filling. Roll up tightly in jelly roll fashion. Place each roll on piece of plastic wrap and roll up tightly, twisting ends. Refrigerate rolls 1 to 8 hours.

Combine vinegar, soy sauce, chili paste and sugar in bowl. (Can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Remove plastic wrap from rolls. Trim ends. Cut each roll into 6 pieces. Place pieces cut side up on platter. Place sauce in center of rolls and serve.

Makes 24.
Per serving: calories, 20; fat, 0 g; sodium, 56 mg; cholesterol, 0 mg
Bon Appétit

Milanese-Style Chard
from Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Shepherd and Raboff

1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 Tablespoons olive oil
2 stalks green garlic, chopped
6 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup chopped basil
pinch nutmeg
1/4 cup chopped prosciutto or ham
2 Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese
salt and pepper to taste

garnish: toasted pine nuts or walnuts

Trim the chard, discarding tough stems, and coarsely chop.

In a large, deep skillet, heat olive oil, add garlic and scallions and saute until softened and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add chard, parsley, basil, nutmeg, prosciutto or ham and mix well together. Cover the skillet and cook over medium heat until tender and wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Mix in Parmesan Cheese and then add salt and pepper to taste. Serve garnished with pine nuts or walnuts.

CHICKEN-PINE NUT DUMPLINGS WITH CHILI-CHILI DIPPING SAUCE

1/2 pound ground chicken
1/2 cup minced drained canned water chestnuts
1/2 cup minced fresh cilantro
1/3 cup finely chopped pine nuts
1/3 cup minced green onions
3 tablespoons dry Sherry
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 large egg, beaten to blend
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
40 wonton wrappers, trimmed into 3-inch squares

Nonstick vegetable oil spray

 

 

 

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Week #6

Week #6 2018

  • Salad mix or head lettuce
  • BEETS !!! we are so excited they are here, eat the beet, eat the greens – this is two for one.
  • Garlic scapes (curls) a spring time favorite – this is the start of the flower of the garlic, see recipes below or just throw them on the grill with olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Kale or chard
  • Kohlrabi – like the broccoli stem, super sweet, make a slaw or peel and eat raw
  • Chinese broccoli – eat the stems, flowers, leaves, so delicious
  • Shallots
  • Sugar snap peas!! Garden candy, more to come

 

We are so excited to welcome two favorites to the list of veggies this week! The first Sugar snap peas, and the long awaited beets. This means it is time to consider lending a hand on the farm. We have a lot of harvesting to do with sugar snap peas and your help makes that work go faster. We harvest Sundays 7:00 – 11:30 and Wednesdays 7:30 – 11:30. We expect helpers to show up at the start of harvest and plan to stay until it is completed. Of course there are circumstances when that is not possible so just let us know. We welcome older kiddos and younger ones are welcome as long as there is a dedicated adult to hang out with them while the other adult actually helps harvest. You are not required to help harvest. We offer this opportunity to get your hands in the dirt and see what it is like to feed over 100 families! We appreciate your help and count on it to get the work of harvest (or weeding) done. It is best for us if you sign up so we know we can count on you coming. You are always welcome to just show up as well. We hope that those who are able will sign up at least twice during the season (now until end of October). Please come prepared to work, we recommend long pants a light long sleeved shirt, sun screen, hat and water.

 

We are in the home stretch of the main planting season. We have gotten in all the onions and shallots we have room for. We have planted celery, celeriac, cherry tomatoes, lettuce, scallions and pole beans. Today I hope to get the peppers in the greenhouse, the main season tomatoes in the field, the tomatillos out and more. Juvencio took down greenhouse #3 (he has been threatening to do so since March 2016 when the plastic tore off in a freak wind storm. It will be dedicated to winter squash in about 2 weeks! He has been a hoeing machine, working to clean up all the ornamental gardens and turn every space we have into productive land.

 

Maya helped me prune and weed the tomatoes in the hoop house. They look super, flowering already. Follow me on Instagram for your fill of farm photos: lyn_c_jacobs . We transplanted onions galore and she seeded all the winter squash, melons and pumpkins. She will be around this week and a bit of next week and then the senior project is done. It has been fun to have her and we wish her well at Georgetown this July.

 

What to look forward to: more sugar snap peas, carrots, new potatoes and zucchini, all very soon!a

 

Asian Style Grilled Tofu with Greens

 

Use tatsoi, mizuna, pea shoots, spinach or bok choi  or Chinese Broccoli for the greens

Dressing:

1 small carrot, chopped

½ cup prepared carrot juice

2 tablespoons white or yellow miso

2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar

1 tablespoon canola oil (I would use olive oil)

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped ginger

½ teaspoon chopped garlic

 

Tofu and Greens

2 14 ounce firm tofu

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons canola oil

2 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce

1 tablespoon black bean past

2 teaspoons minced garlic

10 ounces Asian greens or baby spinach

 

  1. To prepare dressing:  combine carrot, carrot juice, miso, vinegar, oil ginger and garlic in a blender or food processor; blend until smooth.  Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
  2.  preheat grill to medium
  3. To prepare tofu:  Slice each tofu block crosswise into 5 slices; pat dry with paper towels.  Combine honey, oil, soy, black bean paste, garlic in a small bowl.  Spread half the marinade in a large baking dish and top with tofu slices.  Spread the remaining marinade over the tofu to cover completely.
  4. Oil the grill rack.  Grill the tofu until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes per side.  To serve toss greens with the dressing.  Divide among 6 plates and top with tofu.

 

BABY GREENS WITH ROASTED BEETS AND POTATOES
for vinaigrette
1 1/2 tablespoons tarragon white-wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup olive oil

For salad
2 medium beets (1 lb with greens; 14 oz without greens), stems trimmed to 2 inches
1 lb small new potatoes (about 1 inch in diameter) or fingerlings (1 to 1 1/2 inches long), scrubbed well
1 teaspoon olive oil
1/8 teaspoon salt
5 oz micro greens* such as baby Bibb, red-leaf, and oak-leaf lettuces and baby arugula, or mesclun (about 10 cups)
4 cups baby spinach (3 oz)
1/3 cup lovage* leaves, coarsely chopped
1/3 cup fresh chervil and/or dill leaves
1/3 cup fresh tarragon leaves
20 unsprayed organic nasturtium blossoms*
Make vinaigrette:
Whisk together vinegar, mustard, salt, and pepper. Add oil in a slow stream, whisking until emulsified.

Roast beets and potatoes:
Put oven racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat oven to 425°F.

Wrap beets individually in foil and roast on a baking sheet in upper third of oven until tender, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Once beets have roasted for 30 minutes, toss potatoes with oil and salt in a small baking pan and roast in lower third of oven, shaking pan occasionally, until potatoes are tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Carefully unwrap beets and cool slightly, then slip off and discard skins.

Assemble salad:
Cut beets into 1/3-inch dice and put in a large salad bowl. Cut potatoes into 1/3-inch-thick slices and add to beets along with all greens and herbs. Add vinaigrette and toss gently to coat.

Sprinkle blossoms on top and serve immediately

 

BEETS AND CARAMELIZED ONIONS WITH FETA
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (preferably whole-grain or coarse-grain)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
3/4 teaspoon salt
5 tablespoons olive oil
1 lb onions (2 medium), quartered lengthwise, then cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces
2 (15-oz) cans small whole beets, drained and quartered (or halved if very small)

3 oz crumbled feta (1/2 cup)
1/4 cup pine nuts (1 oz), toasted and coarsely chopped
Whisk together vinegar, mustard, pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a large bowl, then add 3 tablespoons oil in a slow stream, whisking until combined well.

Cook onions with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt in remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 18 to 20 minutes. Add onions to dressing, then add beets and cheese, stirring gently to combine. Serve sprinkled with pine nuts.

Gourmet
September 2003

Garlic Scape Hummus

Posted by Carole Koch

Thanks to Kelly Long, Illinois Benedictine University Dietetic Intern, for sharing this recipe!

2 cans of chick peas (garbanzos) drained
1 cup sesame seeds or tahini
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup fresh chopped garlic scapes

Place the ingredients in a blender on high until a thick paste forms. Salt to taste.
Optional: add your favorite curry, to taste.

From www.dakotagarlic.com.

<< Garlic Scapes – A Springtime Treat | Main | Broccoli & Bean Salad >>

 

Garlic Curl Pesto

Use as a dip, pasta sauce, pizza topping (after thinning with more oil) or on bagels. Also delicious in scrambled eggs! Appropriate for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch garlic curls (scapes)
  • 1/4 cup dry roasted peanuts or walnuts or pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese

Preparation

Chop garlic, puree in food processor or blender. Add nuts and puree. Add oil and cheese and puree.

Source: Adapted from Uncommon Fruits and Vegetables—A Common Sense Guide by Elizabeth Schneider

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #5 2018

Week #5

  • Salad Mix – likely the last week as we move into head lettuce. We are so glad to have had an abundance of lettuce from two thriving beds in our first two green houses. Enjoy “Salanova, new Red Fire, Sylvesta, Little Gem, Kirabati and Deer Tongue”.
  • Kohlrabi!! This is an old world vegetable that is in the family with broccoli and cauliflower but instead of a flower head the stem forms a delicious ball. We love to peel it and eat it in thin slices, but there are tons of ways to enjoy it.
  • Radishes or turnips – probably the last of both. They are a bit buggy, cut away the affected parts and enjoy the rest. Don’t forget their tops can be used in Radish top soup.
  • Kale or chard – They are back and growing great.
  • Green garlic – the early stems before the bulb forms are sweet and can be used in any way you would use regular garlic.
  • Shallots or onions
  • Chinese broccoli or bok choi– still not enough of either but take your pick
  • Shallots – likely the last week of these favorites
  • Herbs: oregano, thyme, sage, dill or cilantro (add to eggs, burgers, potatoes , you name it, herbs make food better.

I have just finished almond biscotti for all the Mothers that come to the farm today. There will be coffee and biscotti this afternoon in the barn. Happy Mother’s Day to all. Being a mother is truly the greatest privilege and hardest work we will do in our lives. A big hug to all of you out there, the biggest hug of all to my mother, Geri who will be here celebrating later on tonight.

The farm is taking shape. We have a large swath to plant visible from the barn and the first planting will be done. We have to squeeze in more onions, potatoes, eggplant, peppers, main season tomatoes, pole beans, celeriac, leeks, winter squash, pumpkins and more. I am hoping today will be a good planting day but it may get too hot.

Snap peas are on their way, fava beans are in bloom and carrots and beets are forming sizable roots. We managed to plant 100# of potatoes, ½ the onions and cucumbers this week, along with the regulars of lettuce, spinach and green onions.

I have been busy selling vegetable and flower starts at the Beaverton Farmers Market on Saturdays from 8 – 1:30. Please come by our booth with Pumpkin Ridge Gardens and get your home garden planned. I have some starts here on the farm such as tomatoes, pineapple tomatillos, cukes and zukes, but I have the widest selection at the farmers market. Email me or text me if you want to pick up veggie starts at the farm and I can get them ready for you.

This week we welcomed Maya, our Catlin Gable student to the farm. Maya will be here for the month of May as she explores the life of a farmer. She has already gotten a taste of long days and hard work. We are enjoying having her as she helps with seeding, weeding, transplanting, watering and the farmers market.

We have beef! Juve has sent two steers to the butcher. You can contact him for ¼ or ½ of beef. He will tell you the details but ¼ is about 150# of meat (about 2 shelves in a freezer).We have ground beef as well so inquire with your farmers.

We have been busy with end of the school year events this week. Senior night with Girls Lacrosse was very bitter sweet as Luna played her last home game. It has been an amazing ride, we can’t believe our last child is graduating high school. I am trying to hold it together, but just barely. Prom was last night and graduation is June 7th. Diego has surprised us all by speeding up his graduation from PSU. He will walk on June 15th and finish one last class during the first three weeks of summer. Congratulations to our graduates, we are so happy for them.

Get out the vote! May 15th is election day! You must drop your ballot at a ballot box (public library) by 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday. I have election material in the barn, lawn signs out front and I am happy to talk about why I support a  certain candidate. I have a guide in the barn to the candidates and hope you will help yourself. Please join us for an election night party at La Finquita on May 15 from 6-10 p.m. Juan Carlos  Gonzalez who is running for Washington County Representative to Metro will be celebrating his victory here. This is a unique opportunity to share in the excitement of Election Night with candidates that are local and making the difference in our communities! Join us.

 

Recipes for the week:

Swiss Chard Bisque
By Beverly Matlock (Laura’s Grandmother)

1 bunch chard
1 can chicken broth
1/4 cup butter
1 cup chopped mushrooms
3 tablespoon flour
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
1 pint half and half
salt and pepper
4 slices bacon, crisply fried and crumbled

Slice stems of chard- cook about 3-4 min with 2 tablespoons of broth.

Slice leaves and cook until tender, covered about 3 min. Put chard and remaining broth in blender and whirl until smooth. Should be about 3 to 3 1/2 cups.

Melt butter. Saute mushrooms 5 min. Stir in flour and curry powder. Cook until bubbly and slowly add cream. Stir until thickened. Add chard puree and season to taste. Garnish with bacon when serving.

Laura’s Disclaimer: This is my grandmother’s recipe exactly as she used to make it. I’ve made it more recently with a few modifications. It is still really good with veggie broth and olive oil. You can leave out the dairy or use soy milk and you can leave off the garnish or try croutons or a bit of parmesan or crisp fried tofu instead of bacon.

 

 

 

Swiss  Chard Stalk and Tahini Dip

1 lb Swiss chard stems,  coarsely chopped
2-4 garlic cloves,  mashed
1/2 c tahini
1/4-1/2 c. fresh lemon juice
salt
1 Tbs olive oil
1/4 c. toasted pine nuts (optional)
1 Tbs fresh finely chopped fresh mint (optional)

Boil the stalks in salted water until quite tender;  drain.  Transfer
to a food processor and puree.  Add the garlic and process until well
blended, then add the tahini and salt to taste.  With the machine
running,  slowly add the lemon juice.  Transfer to a wide bowl and
drizzle with the olive oil and garnish with pine nuts and mint if
desired.

Kohlrabi Slaw

Salad:
1 1/4 lbs kohlrabi, peeled and coarsely shredded
2 lge carrots, peeled and coarsely shredded
1/2 sweet red pepper, seeded and diced
1/2 c. chopped scallions, including green

Dressing:
2 T oil, pref olive oil
2 T vinegar (I used white wine vinegar)
2 t or more fresh snipped dill
1 t sugar (I used 1/4 t)
1/2 t ea. cumin and mustard powder
1/4 t crumbled tarragon
1/4 t ea. salt and pepper
1/3 c plain yoghurt

Toss salad ingredients in a bowl. In a separate bowl, blend oil and vinegar, then blend in other ingredients. Pour over salad, toss, cover and refrigerate for about 2 hrs before serving.
Serves 6

Creamy Kohlrabi with Parmesan.

2 large or 3 medium kohlrabi, stalks and leaves removed, peeled, grated
2 tablespoons unsalted butter or olive oil, or combination
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon minced parsley

Heat a medium skillet over medium heat. Add butter and/or oil. When hot, add kohlrabi. Cook, stirring frequently, until vegetable is tender, about 8 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Stir. Toss with cheese. Cook until cheese melts, about 1 minute. Garnish with parsley. Serve hot.

 

 

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Week #4 2018

 

  • Salad mix – Salanova mixed with “New Fire”, “Sylvesta” and “Little Gem” – enjoy the salad while it is sweet and delicate. Wash it well, as slugs also love this spring treat.
  • Radishes – “Cherriette” is bright red and sweet until it gets hot with the heat of the summer. Time to make radish top soup!!
  • Green Garlic – use this early garlic as you would the store bought garlic or follow a recipe below that emphasizes it’s sweet subtle flavor. This is elephant garlic that we got from our Polly and James at Pumpkin Ridge Gardens. We are giving half of our crop as green and the other half we will save for seed for next year
  • Chinese broccoli or white turnips. – The broccoli is coming on, but slowly so not quite enough for everyone just yet. I hope people who got to try it last week will give those who didn’t a chance to enjoy it this week. Remember you are supposed to eat the whole stem and leaves and flower portion. YUM! See the great recipe for turnips too.
  • Bok Choi- a green to add to soups, stir fries , or smoothies. The leaves have tiny wholes which let us know our enemies the flea beetles are live and well! They just affect the appearance, not the taste.
  • Cauliflower – the biggest of the season and the last of the over-wintering variety. Those who arrive early will see a cooler dominated by these giants, they take up 3 shelves. We enjoyed a whole head cut into flowerets, tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper and roasted for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. Also try cauliflower “rice” see recipe below.
  • Onions or shallots
  • Kale, chard or spinach – you choose your green for the week.

We have been busy on the farm clearing and tilling any last remains of season 2017. We are working from the east side of the field towards the hoop houses. We managed to get more lettuce, spinach, green onions, kale and cabbage in the upper portion. We then transplanted the first beans and seeded beets and carrots. We hope to start the process of transplanting the onions later today.

I worked the Beaverton Farmers Market yesterday on opening day and it was a nice crazy busy day. I sell with Polly from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens as we share the market business. We sell vegetable starts, flowers and herb starts and fresh cut flowers.. Next weekend is huge as it is Mother’s day, hope you can join us!  We are there every Saturday from 8 – 1:30 I will be selling at Catlin Gable School this afternoon from 12 – 4 so come and see me. We will have a wide range of plants for your home garden. I have some starts at the farm as well, but I am having a hard time juggling getting the farm planted and seedlings for people, best to come to the market and I will help you get all that you need.

Juvencio’s hogs are making themselves at home. They are running in the yard and eating up as much feed and left over greens as they can. He has a ½ hog left to sell. Contact him immediately as this will be some delicious pork. He also has beef available and it will be our first Wagyu cross. “Wagyu is any of four Japanese breeds of beef cattle, the most desired of which is genetically predisposed to intense marbling and to producing a high percentage of oleaginous unsaturated fat”. He has ¼ left to sell. We will have ground beef available soon as well (it will not be Wagyu) and he would prefer to sell it in 20# increments. Make sure to touch base with him to order your grass fed beef. Contact him via email: lynjuve@msn.com or by text 503-830-0342.

Election time is near. It is very important that we turn in our ballots. I have information in the barn about Washington County candidates and new information about the DA race that is super important. We usually do not have a choice about the DA who sets the tone on equal justice and prosecution for all. Max Wall is the candidate who will ensure that justice is served with an equal hand in our county. Please do take the time to investigate who to vote for. I have a list of recommendations from our political activism group in the barn.

We had a listening session for our state representative Janeen Sollman last Sunday in the barn. It was a fairly good turn out with a lot of differing view points. I had to speak up about immigrant rights, preserving farm land and making sure there is space left to grow food. We will hold the election night celebration for Juan Carlos Gonzalez at the farm on election night 5/15 from 6- 9 p.m. please do join us. I can not remember a more important time to make our voices heard, to speak out for the rights of all to health care, justice, affordable housing, and the right to live without fear. You have an opportunity to participate right here at your farm,  hope to see you here!

Here are the recipes for the week:

Raw Green Garlic Uses: mince and add to salads, pound into a paste to make green garlic aioli, use in salad dressings, sprinkle onto any creation using bread or noodles with cheese

Cooked Green Garlic Uses: Poach the last 4″ of the tips and dress with a mustard vinaigrette, dice and saute the tender portions and add to an omelet or frittata, chop and add to stir frys, chop and add to soup.

Green Garlic Soup Au Gratin

8 Stalks Green Garlic
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Butter
2 Tablespoons Butter, plus 2 teaspoons Butter
8 sl Day-old Bread
1 1/4 c chicken or vegetable Broth
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1/2 c Parmesan Cheese, grated

Remove and discard upper third of garlic stalks; (green leaf ends) thinly slice bulb. Heat olive oil and 1 T butter until beginning to foam. Add garlic; saute 1-2 minutes. Reduce heat, cover tightly, and cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Spread bread with 2 T butter; oven toast until lightly golden. Add broth to garlic, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Ladle into 2 oven-proof serving bowls; cover with toasted bread and top with cheese. Dot each with a teaspoon of butter. Bake at 450F for 10 minutes, until cheese has melted and begun to turn golden.

 

Radish Top Soup

 

Don’t through out your radish greens.  Believe it or not, those fuzzy leaves can be transformed into a smooth green soup, with a hint of watercress flavor.

 

6 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onions or white part of leek

8 cups loosely packed radish leaves

2 cups diced potatoes

6 cups liquid (water, chicken stock or combo)

salt

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

freshly ground pepper

 

Melt 4 T butter in a large saucepan, add onions or leeks and cook until golden, approximately 5 minutes.  Stir in radish tops cover pan and cook over low heat until wilted, 8-10 minutes.  Meanwhile cook potatoes until soft in liquid along with 1 teaspoon of salt.  Combine with the radish tops and cook covered, for 5 minutes to mingle flavors.  Puree finely in a food processor of food mill.  Ad the cream if desired and enrich with 2 T of butter.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve hot. (serves 4-6)

 

 

Moroccan Chicken and Turnip Stew

 

2 cups cooked chickpeas

2 small (2 1/2 lb) chickens

3 Tb butter

1 Tb oil

2 onions

5 cups chicken stock

1/2 tsp white pepper

1/4 tsp ground ginger

1/8 tsp powdered saffron

1/2 tsp turmeric

1 lb small turnips

2 cups chopped turnip leaves and stems

1/4 cup lemon juice

Salt and Pepper to taste

 

Rinse chickpeas in water and rub lightly to remove skins; drain and set aside. Cut chickens into quarters, removing wing tips and backbones; put them aside for stock. Melt butter and oil in a casserole and lightly brown chicken on all sides, cooking in two batches if necessary. Slice onions and stir into butter and oil to color. Then add the chickpeas, stock, pepper, ginger, saffron, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add turnips and greens and simmer 20 minutes more. Remove chicken and turnips to a covered warm dish. Boil sauce to reduce, mashing some of the chickpeas against the side of the pan to thicken the sauce; it may take 10-15 minutes to produce a nice thick sauce. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Reheat the chicken and turnips in the sauce and serve.   Serves 6 to 8.  From The Victory Garden Cookbook.

 

 

Asian Broccoli di cicco

1 pound broccoli di cicco, chopped into 1 inch pieces, including stems and leaves
1 teas. minced garlic
1/3 c. chicken broth
2 tbl. soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Heat a large frying pan until very hot. Add the oil and immediately add the garlic. Let sizzle for 15-20 seconds. Add the remaining ingredients and give everything a quick stir. Without turning the heat down, cover the pan and let steam for 3 minutes, or until the broccoli is done.

Vegetable & Chickpea Curry

1 tablespoon olive or other cooking oil
1 cup chopped onion or leek
1 cup (1/4-inch-thick) slices carrot
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon grated peeled fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic
1 Serrano chile, seeded and minced
3 cups cooked chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
1 cups cubed peeled potato
1 cup coarsely chopped sweet (bell or other) pepper
1 cup cauliflower or romanesco, cut or broken up into florets teaspoon salt teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes, undrained
1 can (14 ounces) vegetable broth
3 cups fresh baby spinach or other cooking greens
1 cup light coconut milk
6 lemon wedges

Heat oil in large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and carrot, cover and cook 5 minutes or until tender. Add curry powder, brown sugar, ginger, cloves and chile. Cook 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Place onion mixture in 5-quart electric slow cooker. Stir in chickpeas, potato, sweet peppers, the cauliflower/romanesco, salt, pepper, ground red pepper, tomatoes and broth. Cover and cook on high 6 hours or until vegetables are tender. Add spinach and coconut milk, stir until spinach wilts. Serve with lemon wedges. Makes 6 servings

Cauliflower & Quinoa Dish  recipe by Jonathan Miller
I made a little cauliflower and quinoa dish last week at work for my quinoa-obsessed client. I used red quinoa, but it is good with ivory as well.

1 c quinoa
1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
1 c broccoli, cut into small pieces
large handful snow peas, sliced
1 shallot, minced
3 T lemon juice
1/2 T curry powder
cilantro
olive oil
marinated artichokes

Cook your quinoa and allow to cool slightly. Steam the cauliflower, broccoli, and snow peas to the texture you like. Make a vinaigrette with the shallot, lemon juice, curry powder, a bit of cilantro, and olive oil. Fold that into the quinoa with the vegetables and add salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm, topped with the artichokes. I also finished this with a blackened fish, but it is fine by itself.

 

Cauliflower Soup from Chef Jonathan Miller

Cauliflower, cut into florets
2-3 carrots, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2-3 T herb of choice (parsley or thyme are good choices)
Broth of choice (chicken stock, veggie stock, or even water), up to 1 quart, depending on size of cauliflower
1-2 c half and half or cream

Sauté the onion and carrots in oil or butter. Cook them until the onions are really soft but not brown. Add the cauliflower and the herbs and cook a few minutes. Add your broth until it comes up just below the level of your veggies and simmer until the cauliflower is cooked, around 12-15 minutes. Add some cream and blend in a blender, then check for salt and pepper.

Link to 25 Cauliflower rice recipes: https://ifoodreal.com/cauliflower-rice-recipes/

 

CAULIFLOWER FRITTERS
1 small head cauliflower (1 3/4 lb), cut into short 1/2-inch-wide florets
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chervil (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
1 tablespoon chopped fresh chives
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
2 oz thinly sliced smoked salmon, torn into 40 small pieces
1/4 cup crème fraîche*

Garnish: fresh chervil or chopped fresh chives
Cook cauliflower with coriander seeds in a 4- to 5-quart pot of simmering salted water, uncovered, until tender, 9 to 11 minutes. Transfer cauliflower with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking. Drain well in a colander, then discard any seeds clinging to cauliflower and pat cauliflower dry. Lightly mash half of florets in a bowl with a fork and gently stir in remaining florets. Whisk together eggs, flour, chervil (if using), parsley, mint, chives, salt, pepper, and nutmeg in a large bowl until combined, then stir in all of cauliflower. Heat 1/2 tablespoon oil in a 10-inch heavy nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking. Working in batches of 6, drop rounded teaspoons of cauliflower mixture into skillet, patting each lightly with back of spoon to flatten into a 1 1/2- to 2-inch round. Fry, turning over once, until golden and cooked through, about 2 minutes per batch, and transfer to platters. Add more oil to skillet between batches as needed.

Top each fritter with a piece of salmon and 1/4 teaspoon crème fraîche. Serve warm.

Cooks’ note:
• Cauliflower can be cooked and mashed (without egg mixture) 1 day ahead and chilled, covered. Bring to room temperature before proceeding.

 

Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce

Chinese Cuisine, Huang Su-Huei

 

12 stalks Chinese broccoli (5-inch lengths)

2 T oyster sauce

1 T corn oil

 

Bring ½ pot of water to a boil; add a dash of salt.  Place the Chinese broccoli in the water and cook for 2 minutes.  Remove and drain.  Place on a serving platter and sprinkle with oyster sauce and oil.  Serve.

 

 

 

 

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Week #3, 2018

Week #3

The Weekly Share

  • Salad mix – our lettuce is at it’s peek! Salanova, a special lettuce developed by Johnny’s makes small perfect leaves that are buttery and delicious. Our Little Gem romaine is also delicious. It is hard work to harvest lettuce like this but well worth the effort.
  • Chard or beet greens
  • Kale – the first of the newly planted kale, very tender and sweet.
  • Parsley or thyme – herbs make your food exciting
  • Cauliflower – this was a long term investment! We seeded this in June, transplanted it in July and are harvesting it in May! We hope you appreciate this delicious veggie.
  • Chinese broccoli (while it lasts!) it is just starting and there are a few bunches with much more to come. This is a family favorite, you eat the stems, leaves and flower portion.
  • Bok choi – a nice addition to any stir fry, and it grows fast so farmers love it.
  • Spinach – this is the first of the spring spinach, it is so tender. Clean well as the tiny slugs love it as well.
  • Onions or shallots – we are nearing the end of our stores from last fall. We will move on to green garlic next week.
  • radishes

We have almost finished planting the back side of the field. Juvencio and I worked into the night until the rain showers sent us inside. We have the cabbage and broccoli transplanted  and we will move on to onions. There are over 25 flats of alliums (onions, shallots, and leeks) that have to be transplanted one at a time. By the time I get them in the ground it will be time to weed the first bed. This is the life of the farmer.

The tomatoes in the hoop house loved the heat and have really taken off. We will harvest the radishes from near by and give them the space they need to grow. I am hopeful that the peppers will get transplanted into several different greenhouses over the next week or so, they still have some growing to do. The cucumbers have been super slow this year and I like to wait until they are a bit larger before I transplant them. They are prone pest infestations and death, so I wait patiently (really??) for them to get to a more substantial size.

Juvencio spends some time each week in McMinnville with our cattle. He has beef available so please contact him. He sells it by the ¼, ½ or whole animla and you pay the butcher fee, the cut and wrap and then you pay the farmer $4/# hanging weight. He also brought home 4 pigs on Thursday and he has sold most of the pork. They will go to the butcher in 4-5 months. If you want meat, make sure to reach out to him ASAP and leave your deposit. He will let you know the details.

I started at the Beaverton Farmer’s Market yesterday. It was a slow day but our starts are looking great! Next Saturday is the official opening of the summer market. I will be there every Saturday from 8 – 1:30 until the fall. Polly and I sell under her farm: Pumpkin Ridge Gardens. We sell all sorts of vegetable starts , perennial and annual flowers and cut flowers. Check out her farm at https://pumpkinridgegardens.com/beaverton-farmers-market/.

Ballots have gone out for the May 15th election. Make sure to turn your ballot in. We have information in the barn about some of the candidates and a list of those candidates we support. We will have the election night celebration for Juan Carlos Gonzalez (running for Washington County Representative to Metro) at the farm on that night May 15 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and everyone is welcome.

Our State representative Janeen Sollman will be at the farm today from 2-3:30 having a listening session. Do join us!

Here are your recipes for the week:

Chinese Broccoli

(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)

1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem

2-4 cloves of garlic minced

1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce

¼ cup water

Olive oil

Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

Chinese Broccoli with Oyster Sauce

Chinese Cuisine, Huang Su-Huei

 

12 stalks Chinese broccoli (5-inch lengths)

2 T oyster sauce

1 T corn oil

 

Bring ½ pot of water to a boil; add a dash of salt.  Place the Chinese broccoli in the water and cook for 2 minutes.  Remove and drain.  Place on a serving platter and sprinkle with oyster sauce and oil.  Serve.

Kale Omelete

By the Armard Family

 

INGREDIENTS

 

– as much kale as you could get with two hands together (as a buch) after it has been chopped (aprox. 2 cups)

– Olive oil (2-3 tablespoons)

– One small well-chopped clove of garlic

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 1/4 cup of feta or chevre cheese (small pieces)

– 1 small-medium riped tomato or 4-5 cherry tomatoes (chopped)

– Fresh black pepper

– 3 eggs

– Finely chopped basil or parsley

 

PROCEDURES

 

– Stir the eggs very well with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and black pepper in a bowl. Set aside

– Heat the olive oil at medium-high and when hot add the kale and the chopped garlic. Cook until kale is soft stirring constantly. Don’t overcook. Then take out

– Reduce the fire to low-medium (let the pan cool down a little first), re-stir the eggs and poor them on the pan (use more olive oil if needed before adding the eggs)

– Immediately add the cooked kale/garlic, the chopped tomatoes, the cheese and the remaining salt

– Cover for about a minute with a lid

– Fold or whatever you prefer or can do (fritatta Vs. Omelette)

– Take out and add some chopped parsley or basil on top

Little gem salad

Bon appetite

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 garlic cloves, smashed
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more
  • Kosher salt
  • ¼ cup blanched hazelnuts
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
  • 6 heads of Little Gem (about 1 pound total), cores removed, leaves separated
  • 4 small carrots (about 4 ounces), scrubbed, thinly sliced lengthwise on a mandoline
  • ½ cup mint leaves
  • 1½ ounces SarVecchio or Parmesan
  • Flaky sea salt

RECIPE PREPARATION

  • Combine garlic, cream, and ½ tsp. pepper in a small bowl; season with salt. Cover and chill 1 hour.
  • Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°. Toast hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing occasionally, until golden brown, 8–10 minutes. Let cool before chopping coarsely.
  • Strain cream mixture into a large bowl and add oil. Whip to soft peaks, then whisk in 1 Tbsp. lemon juice. Taste and season with more salt and pepper if needed.
  • Toss lettuce, carrots, mint, and half of hazelnuts with remaining 1 Tbsp. lemon juice in another large bowl; season with salt and pepper. Add a few dollops of lemon cream and gently toss to coat.
  • Spoon remaining lemon cream onto a platter and top with salad. Shave cheese over salad and top with cracked pepper, sea salt, and remaining hazelnuts.

Recipe by Joshua McFadden, Ava Gene’s, Portland, Oregon

Photos by Michael Graydon Nikole Herriott

 

 

 

 

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Weekly Share #2

Week #2, 2018

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Chard or beet greens
  • Bok choi
  • Thyme or sage
  • Parsley or cilantro
  • Onions and shallots

This is the time of year that the winter veggie supply dwindles and the spring crops are not quite there yet. We have a beautiful bloom of kale in the fields with small micro leaves while the early spring planted kale has 3 edible leaves on each plant. This means a week without kale for you all. This next week of warm weather should send all the crops in our hoop houses into overdrive (we hope) and make our harvest in the next few weeks easier. For now it is the time of the herb and green, see the recipes I have for eggs with greens, make a green smoothie or stir fry.

Juvencio has been happily preparing the field for planting. I am not sure he would describe this as a happy event as he has to pull the drip irrigation from each bed. In the fall the irrigation is shut off, but we are usually exhausted and the pipes remain in the fields. Then in February the cover crop and weeds take off and grow over the pipes in a tangle that traps them below. It is a process to get the pipes out, the cover crop mowed and the fields spread with compost. Juvencio will then rough out the beds and hand till most of them just before I plant them. He often top dresses each bed with a pillow of fresh compost as well.

This warm weather not only dries out the soil allowing us to prep the ground but it gives the weeds the needed push to explode. At this time of year there is so much to do it is hard to know which direction to turn. Seed, plant, prep, weed, clean, many of these things need to be done simultaneously. Did I forget to mention the pests? Well, they are getting us from above ground (birds, mice, aphids, cucumber beetles) and from below ground (gophers, moles and the like) as we race to outsmart or out plant them. All this discussion just makes me want to stop writing and get out there and harvest! We hope to get the cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower in the ground this week. We managed to get two beds of lettuce, the shelling peas, kohlrabi and fennel planted yesterday. The onions, shallots and leeks are looming, I have over 25 flats of these grass-like seedlings to get into the ground by mid-May.

Next weekend I will start selling at the Beaverton Farmers Market. I sell with my friend and business partner Polly Gottesman from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens. We sell under her farm’s name and are there every Saturday from 8 – 1:30. We sell seedlings of vegetables, herbs and flowers. Please do come and visit me. I will also have some vegetable starts here at the farm for sale. I will put out a list of veggies in the next week or so for you to let me know what you would like to purchase.

Enjoy your week, here are some suggestions for your veggies this week:

Bok Choy:

from a CSA member:
Bok Choy: (the bok choy in the box was amazingly good!)

1 T oil
1.5 lbs bok choy
1 T light soy sauce
2 T chicken stock or water

Heat wok over moderate heat. Add oil and then bok choy. Stir fry 3-4
minutes, until leaves have wilted a little. Add soy sauce and chicken stock/water.
Continue to stir fry for a few more minutes, until the bok choy is done until still slightly
crisp.

Very easy, very good.
Source: Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery
(very good recipes, clear instructions, and excellent taste)

SAUTEED BOK CHOY W/ CASHEW SAUCE
Serving Size : 4
1/2 c Cashews — roasted
1/4 c White vinegar
1/4 c Water
1/4 c Sugar
1/4 c Soy sauce
1 tb Ginger — minced
7 dashes Tabasco sauce
2 tb Basil — finely chopped
2 tb Mint — finely chopped
1 1/2 lb Bok choy — washed & dried 1/3 c Peanut oil 1. In a food processor or blender, combine the cashews, vinegar, water, sugar, soy sauce, ginger, Tabasco, basil and mint, and puree. 2. Separate bok choy leaves from stalks, and cut stalks into 1-inch-long- pieces. In a large sauté pan, heat oil over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add bok choy and cook, stirring briskly, for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, until it is bright green and well seared. Remove from heat, drape with cashew sauce and serve at once. Yield: 4 servings. Approximate nutritional analysis per serving: 340 calories, 25 grams fat, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 1,065: milligrams sodium, 7 grams protein, 25 grams carbohydrate. ** New York Times — Living Arts section — 29 November 1995 **

Bok Choy Stir Fry

This is an easy recipe.

1 1/2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry Sherry
1 teaspoon oriental sesame oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
3 1/2 cups thinly sliced trimmed bok choy
1 5-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained
3 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces
10 1/2 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

Combine first 4 ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Heat vegetable oil until very hot in heavy large wok or skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and crushed red pepper. Stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add bok choy and stir-fry until just wilted, about 2 minutes. Mix in water chestnuts and green onions and stir-fry until onions are tender, about 1 minute. Add tofu and lightly stir-fry until tofu is just heated through, about 2 minutes. Pour over soy mixture. Stir-fry until liquid boils and thickens, about 1 minute.

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

 

Spinach Soup

Chez Panisse Vegetables, Alice Waters

 

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is till delicious!)

 

1 onion

1 clove of garlic

1 small carrot

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 cups chicken broth

½ cup parsley leaves

2 bunches young spinach

2 sprigs fresh tarragon

2 tablespoons crème fraiche

 

Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin.  Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

 

Serves 6

 

 

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