Week #7

 

  • Spinach or chard
  • Carrots or beets
  • Green onions
  • Sugar snap peas – we are happy to feature them this week and for the next few weeks as long as we don’t think about how many there could have been without the goat invasion.
  • Garlic – fresh heads, not cured yet, so their flavor is mild. Peel and chop as you normally would.
  • Cilantro, dill or parsley – the herbs are coming, they add spice to your life.
  • Kale – finally our friend has taken off, we have tons of it! Enjoy kale at every meal!!
  • Lettuce – we have moved on from salad mix to head lettuce, we have a lot! Wash carefully , spin dry and you will have salad all week. If you haven’t tried my salad dressing yet, now is your chance. We always come back to it as it takes any bitter edge off.
  • Kohlrabi or radish choose one

This has been a busy week trying to keep up with the weeds. Juve managed to whip some of the garden into shape as he tilled all the paths. The drizzle of rain gave everything a boost, especially the pig weed! The lettuce took off in a way we didn’t think possible. I plant lettuce every week, but it seems that it is all ready at once. Enjoy salad every day, I guess nature is telling you what you need at this time of year, green.

The tomatoes in the greenhouse have flowers and a few small fruits, hoping for a July start on tomatoes. The peppers inside and outside the hoop house are bulking up and seem to enjoy this weather as well. We got over 150 eggplant in the ground as well as all the outdoor tomatoes. We are officially out of space and have to wait for crops to finish before we can add more. Fall crops like broccoli and cauliflower will soon be seeded. The Brussels are already up and will be transplanted into the beds freed up by the garlic. CSA farming is never DONE, but is constantly a rotating work of art. Make sure to look out from the barn window this week, it really looks beautiful out there. If you have time, stroll into the field and see the broccoli, cabbage, lettuce and onions growing.

We had a big week of pizza parties. We fired up the oven for Jacob’s PSU sustainability club after they helped us with the harvest last Sunday. We also hosted the Liberty Girls Lacrosse team end of the season celebration on Thursday night.  Today we have an Indian feast. My first attempt at one of my favorite dishes, Chicken Tikka Masala. We will see how that turns out. We did roast goat last weekend and it was quite good. The curry was better than my barbacoa, who knew goat could be so tender. This week I will be busy arranging wedding flowers in addition to farming.

Next weekend is Memorial Day, we will harvest as usual on Sunday and we understand that some people who usually pick up on Monday may wait until Tuesday, that is fine. I had better stop chatting and get out there and harvest. We hope you are keeping up with the veggies, remember kale for breakfast is delicious! The crispy kale recipe takes care of the entire bunch and is eaten like an appetizer in our family.

Here is a recipe shared by new member and cooking enthusiast Pat Lando. He says he just whipped it up on Sunday(last week) and it was a hit with the whole family.

Braised Lentils with Spinach

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1-1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 1 small onions, diced
  • 1 medium carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 stalk celery, trimmed and diced
  • 1 bay leaves
  • Salt
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock or canned reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups finely shredded fresh spinach, thoroughly washed and drained

Preparation

    1. Pour enough cold water over the lentils, onions, carrots, celery, and bay leaves in a 3-quart saucepan to cover by three fingers. Season with salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Adjust the heat so the water is at a gentle boil and cook until the lentils are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, discard the bay leaves, and transfer to a large skillet.
    2. Pour in the chicken stock and olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cook until the liquid is reduced enough to coat the lentils, about 3 minutes. Scatter the spinach over the lentils and toss just until the spinach is wilted, about 1 minute. Taste and add salt and pepper if necessary. Serve immediately.

Notes

    1. I didn’t use chicken stock, but instead cooked ¾ lbs boneless, skinless chicken in the pan (with herbs) then deglazed the pan with white wine and added the lentils.
    2. I used all of the spinach stalks instead of the greens which turned out really well.

 

 

Roasted Beets w/ Feta

 

Directions

Peel 4 medium beets and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste on a baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring once or twice, until tender, 35 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; toss with 4 chopped scallions and 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Top with crumbled feta.

Beet with Sesame Vinaigrette

 

1 pound beets (after cooking there should be about 2 cups)

6 tablespoons mild olive oil

2 teaspoons Oriental sesame oil

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons sesame seeds, additional for garnish

salt and pepper to taste

 

Trim tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch from the beets, so that they don’t bleed too much.  Put the beets in a pot and cover with cold water.  Heat to boiling, then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered until tender.  Pour off most of the hot water and add cold water to the pot.  Peel the beets while they are still warm.  Or you may rub the beets with a little oil and bake them in a covered pan at 350 until tender.  If the beets are large, cut them into ¼ inch slices.  If they are small, cut them into 4 – 8 wedges.  Place the beets in a large mixing bowl.

Whisk the remaining ingredients together, pour over the still warm beets, and toss to coat.  Sprinkle more sesame seeds if you like and serve.

 

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Week #6

  • Spinach – last of the hoop house spinach, unfortunately the out door spinach did not do as well. We tried a new variety that is not as intense a green and not as sweet. Luckily spinach can always be cooked and added to dishes.
  • Garlic scapes or green garlic – all the garlic has begun to bloom (produce its seed head) We are giving it all this week. The rusty color you see on the stems is a plague that affects the plants ability to grow and it is in the soil. Wash it off, enjoy the scapes in recipes from this week and last. Green garlic can be used as you would the scapes or as you would regular garlic, it is just a less intense flavor as it is not cured.
  • Kale – if you aren’t making the crispy kale yet or the kale salad below, you are not enjoying kale yet. This is a staple on our farm and a must for our family dinner.
  • Sugar snap peas! – just a tease as the goats ate most of them. Enjoy a few of these sweet treats and think of us as we have our goat curry tonight!
  • Green onions – these are the most healthy of the onion family, enjoy them in stir fries, salads and the like, don’t let them languish in your fridge.
  • Carrots or beets – both spring sweet, take your pick. Beets have been so hard to get this spring due to the tiny sparrows that love to eat them just as they germinate and poke their bright red heads out of the soil. We will try again, but man, are we sick of the pests!
  • Head lettuce or salad mix. The lettuce outside is almost ready, so we change gears and give you head lettuce, make your own mix and match. This cool weather will give our lettuce longer life, those 90 degree days send a bad message.
  • Radishes or kohlrabi – both great raw or sautéed.

We have been plugging away, after the goat debacle, we are frantically planting and at the same time weeding what we have previously planted. We are hoping the outdoor crops will take off with cooler weather, but 90 degree days all last week many early crops are heading to bolt (go to seed). We planted beans and hope they win the race against the cucumber beetles. Juve excelled at getting the trellis up in less than an hour. We almost always seem to be racing to get them support before they get tangled up with each other, but timing this year seems to be just right.

We even adventured with peppers, padrons are in the ground. If they are slow to grow the beetles get their growing parts and they can’t survive. I think this cool, wet week will help. We have 3 rows in the greenhouse and are starting a long row outside. We will plant the tomatoes outside today with the help of the “sustainability club” from PSU. The tomatoes inside the hoop house are already in need .trellising and showing their first blooms. Don’t get too excited as they are still 2 months off from the first edible fruit.

Maria, our Catlin Gable Senior intern helped get the winter squash seeded last week. Our planting team from ABC (Alameda Beaumont Childcare, members for over 11 years) helped seed melons of all sorts and pumpkins too. We look forward to a great melon season, if the kids don’t eat them all. Maria is with us for the month of May as she completes her senior project. She has been very helpful, harvesting, seeding and helping out at the farmers market.

As promised, “once sugar snap peas are ready to pick we will ask for your help”. It is time to sign up to help harvest. We ask that each member help us with the harvest twice during the season. We are short handed this summer with both boys taking college courses. Please plan on coming out by 7:30 (if it is going to be really hot, over 85) we start at 0700, and staying until harvest is done 11;30 or 12:00. This is an opportunity for you to get your hands in the dirt and get a small taste of what is like to grow food for over 100 people. Kids are welcome, but please bring an adult to watch them and an adult to do the farm work. Sign-up sheet in the barn.

I went kind of crazy with recipes this week, there should be something for everyone! Enjoy cooking with your veggies!

It is time to you pick! Strawberries are coming in and many of our Helvetia neighbors have picking available. Check out the Tri county  information at: http://www.tricountyfarm.org/farms. Our neighbors on Helvetia are not organic but are open for you pick Monday – Saturday.

Off to harvest, enjoy your week.

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

Chioggia beet salad
adapted from the LA Times: November 15, 2006

Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes, plus 1 hour standing time

Servings: 4

Note: From Christian Shaffer. Red and golden beets may be used instead of the Chioggia beets.

1 bunch beets: any color
1 tablespoon seasoned rice vinegar
1 Tablespoons good-quality olive oil
1/2 teaspoon (scant) toasted ground coriander seeds
1 shallot, minced
4 ounces (1/2 cup) crème fraîche or sour cream
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon plus 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1-2 tablespoons fresh mint or chervil or parsley, whole leaves or rough chopped

1. Boil the beets in enough water to cover, with 2 tablespoons salt, until tender, about 30 minutes, depending on the size of beet.

  1. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, oil, coriander and shallot and set the mixture aside for 30 minutes. In another bowl, combine the crème fraîche, horseradish, one-half teaspoon salt and pepper and set aside.
  2. Drain the beets and, while still warm, peel them. Slice them into wedges, about 8 to 10 per beet, and cool.
  3. Pour the vinegar mixture over the beets and let stand, covered, at room temperature for an hour. Spoon the horseradish cream onto a platter, covering the bottom. Using a slotted spoon, mound the beets over the cream. Garnish the beets with the chervil and serve.

Each serving: 152 calories; 2 grams protein; 8 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 13 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat; 12 mg. cholesterol; 285 mg. sodium.

Braised Chicken with Green Garlic
from Weir Cooking in the City by Joanne Weir

1 large chicken (about 4 pounds)
2 T butter
2 T olive oil
S and P
1 cup water
3-5 stalks green garlic, trimmed and cleaned as you would a leek, and chopped
1 1/4 cups white wine
1 1/2 cups chicken stock

Remove the wings from the chicken and discard. Cut the chicken into 8 pieces, each breast half cut crosswise into 2 pieces, 2 thighs, and 2 drumsticks.

Melt the butter in the olive oil in a large skillet over med-high heat. Working in batches if necessary, add the chicken, season with S and P, and cook until golden brown on one side, 6-8 minutes. Turn the chicken pieces and cook unti lgolden brown on the second side, another 6-8 minutes. Transfer chicken to aplatter; cover with foil, and keep warm. Pour the excess fat from the pan and discard.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the water and garlic, and cook until the garlic is soft and the water has almost evaporated, about 10 minutes. Add more water during cooking if necessary. Puree in a blender on high speed until very smooth; reserve.

Return the chicken to the pan and increase the heat to high. Add the white wine, chicken stock, and garlic paste and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover , and simmer until the chicken can be easily skewered, 20-25 minutes. Season with S & P.

Transfer the chicken to a platter and cover with foil. Over high heat, reduce the sauce until slightly thickened. Pour the sauce over the chicken and serve.

Serves 6.

Kohlrabi Saute w/ Garlic & Lemon Juice:

2 med Kohlrabi bulbs
1 Tbls olive oil
1 Garlic clove, finely chopped
1 med Onion, chopped
1 Tbls Lemon juice
2 Tbls Parsley, chopped
2 Tbls sour cream
Salt & freshly ground pepper
Peel the tough outer skin from the kohlrabi, then coarsely grate the bulbs. In a skillet, heat olive oil. Add garlic, onion and kohlrabi and saute, stirring for 5 to 7 minutes until kohlrabi is tender crisp. Stir in lemon juice and parsley, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in sour cream, and serve hot.

Sugar Snap Peas with shallots and Thyme

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 pound sugar snap peas
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallots
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • kosher salt to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
  2. Spread sugar snap peas in a single layer on a medium baking sheet, and brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with shallots, thyme, and kosher salt.
  3. Bake 6 to 8 minutes in the preheated oven, until tender but firm.

 

Lemony Sugar Snap Peas

Thanks to Benedictine University Dietetic Intern Erica Hanson for sharing this recipe. Erica says this recipe is great for kids because it combines new flavors with a favorite vegetable…and “once the ingredients are prepared by an adult, kids can prepare the rest of the recipe on their own.”

2 ounces raw sugar snap peas
1/2 peeled and sliced Hass avocado
1/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
1/16 teaspoon kosher salt
1/16 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

In a bowl, whisk together the mustard, lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Add the raw sugar snap peas and avocado, tossing gently to combine.

Serves 2.

Kale Omelet

By the Armard Family

 

INGREDIENTS

 

– as much kale as you could get with two hands together (as a bunch) after it has been chopped (aprox. 2 cups)

– Olive oil (2-3 tablespoons)

– One small well-chopped clove of garlic

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 1/4 cup of feta or chevre cheese (small pieces)

– 1 small-medium ripe tomato or 4-5 cherry tomatoes (chopped)

– Fresh black pepper

– 3 eggs

– Finely chopped basil or parsley

 

PROCEDURES

– Stir the eggs very well with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and black pepper in a bowl. Set aside

– Heat the olive oil at medium-high and when hot add the kale and the chopped garlic. Cook until kale is soft stirring constantly. Don’t overcook. Then take out

– Reduce the fire to low-medium (let the pan cool down a little first), re-stir the eggs and poor them on the pan (use more olive oil if needed before adding the eggs)

– Immediately add the cooked kale/garlic, the chopped tomatoes, the cheese and the remaining salt

– Cover for about a minute with a lid

– Fold or whatever you prefer or can do (frittata Vs. Omelets)

– Take out and add some chopped parsley or basil on top

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

Spring Onion Sandwiches
from Chez Panisse Vegetables by Alice Waters

Onion Sandwiches were an old favorite of James Beard’s. These are best made in may when onions are very sweet. Trim the crusts off thin slices of good white bread. Spread two slices of bread with mayonnaise, on one side. Slice fresh onion very thinly and make a layer of onion slices on one slice of bread. Top that with the other slice of bread. Dip the four side edges of the sandwich into thin mayonnaise and then into chopped parsley.

from Marcella, a CSA member:

One of our favorite ways to enjoy scallions is as a vegetable side dish.

Scallions and Carrots

1 bunch scallions, roots trimmed and white part cut into a 4″ length
2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into sticks
1 T olive oil
1 T butter
1/4 t sugar
2 T soy sauce

Saute the scallions in the olive oil for 3 minutes. Add the carrots and continue to cook until vegetables begin to soften and turn golden. Add butter, soy sauce and sugar and cook 30 seconds more.

Milanese-Style Chard
from Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Shepherd and Raboff

1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 Tablespoons olive oil
2 stalks green garlic, chopped
6 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup chopped basil
pinch nutmeg
1/4 cup chopped prosciutto or ham
2 Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese
salt and pepper to taste

garnish: toasted pine nuts or walnuts

Trim the chard, discarding tough stems, and coarsely chop.

In a large, deep skillet, heat olive oil, add garlic and scallions and saute until softened and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add chard, parsley, basil, nutmeg, prosciutto or ham and mix well together. Cover the skillet and cook over medium heat until tender and wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Mix in Parmesan Cheese and then add salt and pepper to taste. Serve garnished with pine nuts or walnuts.

Chinese Scallion Pancakes
recipe by Elsa Chen

Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups flour, plus more for flouring the rolling surface
1 cup water
2 teaspoons oil
A bunch of green onions, green and white parts, chopped medium-fine

A few tablespoons of oil to brush on pancakes (a mix of canola or corn oil and sesame oil is good) some salt A few tablespoons sesame seeds (optional)

Directions:
Mix together the first three ingredients by hand or in a food processor. Flour a surface and knead the dough. Let it rest for 20-30 minutes before continuing.
With a rolling pin, roll the dough out on a well-floured surface into a big, flat square or rectangle 1/8 to 1/4 inch thick.
Brush the pancake with a bit of oil, and sprinkle with spring onion pieces and a little salt. Starting at one short end, roll up the dough tightly, jelly-roll style, so you have a “snake.”
Cut the “snake” crosswise into 8 – 10 pieces. Then flatten each piece again gently with your palm and rolling pin to make a little rectangle. Don’t flatten it too firmly, because you want a little air to remain trapped between the layers of the pancakes so they’ll puff up a bit between the layers and be lighter.
Press one or both sides in sesame seeds (optional).
Heat a tablespoon or two of oil in a large skillet. Shallow fry the pancakes until both sides are golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels.
Serve plain or with dipping sauce. An easy sauce can be made by mixing soy sauce with a little minced garlic, scallion, and rice vinegar.

Green Onion Pancake by Stella Fong

2 cups flour
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1/2 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 to 1/2 cup cold water
vegetable oil spray
1/2 cup minced green onions
Mix together flour and boiling water. Add 1/3 cup cold water and knead until dough is smooth and elastic. Add more water if necessary. Cover and let dough rest for about 15 minutes. In a small bowl, combine sesame oil, salt and green onions. Set aside. Divide dough into 10 pieces. Flatten each piece in the palm of your hand. Then roll out into a 6-inch circle. Spread each piece with the green onion mixture.
Roll up dough into a jellyroll. Then wind up into a snail shape. Flatten slightly; roll on lightly floured surface to 5-inch circle. Spray pan with vegetable oil spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Fry pancake until golden brown, about 2 minutes, turn and cook other side. Serve hot. Makes 10 pancakes

SCALLION AND ANISE PITA TOASTS

Can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.

1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 scallion, minced
1/4 teaspoon aniseed, crushed
two 6-inch pita loaves, halved horizontally

Preheat broiler.

In a small saucepan, heat butter over moderate heat until foam subsides. Add scallion and aniseed and
cook, stirring until scallion is slightly softened. Arrange pita halves, rough sides up, on a baking sheet
and brush with butter mixture. Season pita halves with salt and pepper. Broil pita halves about 4
inches from heat 30 seconds, or until golden. Transfer pita toasts to a cutting board and immediately
cut each into 6 wedges.

Makes 24 toasts. Gourmet February 1995

TUNA DIP WITH LEMON AND CAPERS

two 6-ounce cans solid white tuna packed in oil, drained well
a 10 1/4-ounce package soft tofu, drained
3 scallions, minced
1 carrot, shredded fine
2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
2 tablespoons drained capers, chopped
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Accompaniment: crackers or assorted crudites

In a bowl stir tuna with a fork until finely flaked. In another bowl whisk tofu until smooth. Stir tofu
and remaining ingredients into tuna until combined and season with salt and pepper. Serve dip with
crackers or crudites.

Makes about 3 cups. Gourmet July 1995 The Last Touch

CARROT SCALLION FRITTERS

3/4 cup coarsely grated carrot
1/2 cup thinly sliced scallion
1 large egg, beaten lightly
1/3 cup fine dry bread crumbs
vegetable oil for deep-frying

In a bowl combine well the carrot, the scallion, the egg, the bread crumbs, and salt and pepper to
taste. In a large skillet heat 1 inch of the oil until it registers 375¡F. on a deep-fat thermometer, in
batches drop the carrot mixture into the oil by tablespoons, and fry the fritters for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes,
or until they are golden. Transfer the fritters to paper towels and let them drain. Serve the fritters as
hors d’ oeuvres or as a side dish.

Makes about 10 fritters. Gourmet November 1990

SCALLION GOAT CHEESE MUFFINS

1 cup whole milk
4 ounces soft mild goat cheese
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter
1 large egg
1 bunch scallions

Preheat oven to 400¡F. and butter twelve 1/3-cup muffin cups.

In a small bowl stir together 2 tablespoons milk and goat cheese until combined. Into a bowl sift
together flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Melt butter and in another small bowl whisk together
with remaining milk and egg. Finely chop enough scallions to measure 1 cup. Stir butter mixture and
scallions into flour mixture until just combined. Divide half of batter evenly among muffin cups and
top each with about 2 teaspoons goat cheese filling. Divide remaining batter over filling. Bake muffins
in middle of oven until golden and a tester comes out clean, about 20 minutes.

Makes 12 muffins. Gourmet

Lydias Ladybug

ORZO PILAF WITH GREEN ONIONS AND PARMESAN CHEESE

3 1/4 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
1 pound orzo (rice-shaped pasta)
5 green onions, thinly sliced
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Bring 3 1/4 cups broth to boil in heavy large saucepan over medium-high heat. Mix in orzo and simmer uncovered until just tender but still firm to bite and some broth still remains, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes.
Remove from heat. Add green onions and cheese and stir to blend. Season pilaf to taste with salt and pepper. Rewarm over low heat, if necessary, and mix in more broth by 1/4 cupfuls if pilaf is dry. Transfer pilaf to large bowl and serve.
Serves 6.
Bon Appétit
April 1999

simple beet salad with onions

grate scrubbed beets or cut into julienne: toss with chopped green onions and a vinaigrette you make or from a bottle in your fridge. Add toasted nuts and/or a sharp cheese (blue, parmesan, feta). Serve alone or with lettuce.


GREEN ONION DROP BISCUITS,
Cooking Light, NOVEMBER 1996

Tips: Use a food processor to combine dry ingredients and shortening. Pulse a few times until the mixture is the size of peas. If you don’t have buttermilk, you can substitute plain yogurt.

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 tablespoons vegetable shortening
1/4 cup finely chopped green onions
1 cup low-fat buttermilk
Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 400°.
Combine first 4 ingredients in a large bowl; cut in shortening with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in green onions. Add buttermilk, stirring just until flour mixture is moist.

Drop batter by heaping tablespoons onto a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until lightly browned.

Yield: 16 servings (serving size: 1 biscuit)

QUINOA CHOWDER WITH SPINACH, FETA CHEESE AND GREEN ONIONS, Cooking Light, DECEMBER 1999

8 cups water
3/4 cup uncooked quinoa
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 tablespoons finely chopped seeded jalapeño pepper
1 garlic clove, minced
2 1/2 cups diced peeled baking potato (about 1 pound)
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2/3 cup thinly sliced green onions, divided
3 cups thinly sliced spinach
1 cup (4 ounces) crumbled feta cheese
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation
Combine water and quinoa in a Dutch oven; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Drain in a sieve over a bowl, reserving cooking liquid; add enough water to cooking liquid to measure 6 cups. Set quinoa aside.
Heat oil in pan over medium heat. Add jalapeño and garlic; cook 30 seconds.
Stir in potato, salt, cumin, and black pepper; cook 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in 6 cups cooking liquid, quinoa, and 1/3 cup onions; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes or until potato is tender.
Stir in 1/3 cup onions and spinach; cook 3 minutes. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese and cilantro.

Yield
8 servings (serving size: 1 1/4 cups)

Chili Cottage Cheese Dip from Too Many Tomatoes, Squash, Beans, and Other Good Things A cookbook for when your garden explodes by L. Landau and L. Myers

1 pint small curd cottage cheese
2-4 chili peppers (jalapeños or wax peppers, the waxes this week are spicier…), peeled and chopped (you can roast or blanch them to peel them, or not peel them at all… -Julia)
2 tomatoes, peeled and diced
3 scallions, including tops, chopped
1 teaspoon salt or less to taste
½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (or soy sauce to make it completely vegetarian: worch. sauce has a bit of fish in it….)

Mix. Chill for 3 hours. (Julia’s note: I admit I’ve not made this, but when I try it I will play with the pulse feature of my food processor…)

MINCED LAMB WITH GINGER, HOISIN AND GREEN ONIONS

Serve this quick stir-fry with rice.

2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 pound ground lamb
1 tablespoon oriental sesame oil
2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
1 tablespoon minced orange peel
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1/4 cup hoisin sauce
Butter lettuce leaves

Combine orange juice and cornstarch in small bowl. SautŽ lamb in heavy large skillet over high heat until cooked through, breaking up with back of spoon, about 5 minutes. Pour lamb with its juices into colander; drain. Heat oil in same skillet over high heat. Add ginger, garlic and orange peel; stir-fry 30 seconds. Add green onions 30 seconds. Add hoisin sauce and lamb to skillet; stir until blended. Add orange juice mixture; stir until thickened, about 1 minute. Spoon into lettuce leaves.

Serves 4. Bon Appetit April 1994

VEGETARIAN SUSHI

4 to 8 lettuce leaves
3 ounces somen (thin Japanese wheat noodles)*

1/2 cup matchstick-size strips carrots
1/2 cup matchstick-size strips green onion
1/2 cup matchstick-size strips red bell pepper (can be left out)
Fresh cilantro leaves

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon chili paste with garlic*
1 teaspoon sugar

*Thin Japanese wheat noodles and chili paste with garlic are available at Asian markets, specialty foods stores, and in the Asian section of some supermarkets.

Pat lettuce leaves dry. Put water to boil. Add noodles and cook until tender, about 2 minutes. Drain. Refresh under cold water and drain.

Arrange 4 lettuce leaves on work surface. Place additional leaves on each arranged leaf if needed to form 8-inch length. Place 1/4 cup noodles along 1 long side of each leaf forming 1-inch-wide strip. Arrange carrots atop noodles, then green onion, bell pepper and cilantro leaves. Starting from 1 long side, roll leaf over filling. Roll up tightly in jelly roll fashion. Place each roll on piece of plastic wrap and roll up tightly, twisting ends. Refrigerate rolls 1 to 8 hours.

Combine vinegar, soy sauce, chili paste and sugar in bowl. (Can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Remove plastic wrap from rolls. Trim ends. Cut each roll into 6 pieces. Place pieces cut side up on platter. Place sauce in center of rolls and serve.

Makes 24.
Per serving: calories, 20; fat, 0 g; sodium, 56 mg; cholesterol, 0 mg
Bon Appétit

Milanese-Style Chard
from Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Shepherd and Raboff

1 bunch Swiss Chard
1 Tablespoons olive oil
2 stalks green garlic, chopped
6 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup chopped basil
pinch nutmeg
1/4 cup chopped prosciutto or ham
2 Tablespoons Parmesan Cheese
salt and pepper to taste

garnish: toasted pine nuts or walnuts

Trim the chard, discarding tough stems, and coarsely chop.

In a large, deep skillet, heat olive oil, add garlic and scallions and saute until softened and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add chard, parsley, basil, nutmeg, prosciutto or ham and mix well together. Cover the skillet and cook over medium heat until tender and wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. Mix in Parmesan Cheese and then add salt and pepper to taste. Serve garnished with pine nuts or walnuts.

CHICKEN-PINE NUT DUMPLINGS WITH CHILI-CHILI DIPPING SAUCE

1/2 pound ground chicken
1/2 cup minced drained canned water chestnuts
1/2 cup minced fresh cilantro
1/3 cup finely chopped pine nuts
1/3 cup minced green onions
3 tablespoons dry Sherry
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 large egg, beaten to blend
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
40 wonton wrappers, trimmed into 3-inch squares

Nonstick vegetable oil spray

 

 

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Week #5 – goat destruction

Week #5

  • Lettuce – delicious salad mix is being left behind, don’t miss out on the salanova while we have it!
  • Spinach – Osborne special dark green leaves
  • Swiss chard – an abundance of greens, if you read the note you will see why
  • Kale – cripsy, in salad, sauteed with bacon, any way you like kale is a mainstay in our diets, enjoy
  • Garlic scapes – these are the flowers of the garlic, pungent and sweet. They are a delicacy to be eaten as you would regular garlic, or on the grill. This may be their last week as we see rust setting in. This is a soil and wind born disease of grasses and is pretty much endemic in the Willamette Valley. Garlic is suseptable and even though we rotate the crop every year from one end of the farm to the other we get it every year. It does not damage the garlic itself but the leaves shrivel and the heads do not reach their potential due to lack of photosynthetic ability.
  • Cilantro or dill or sage – an herb to spice up your life
  • Carrots or beets – there are a few, they could be left to get bigger but with the attach from above (goats) and below (gophers and rust flies) it is better to get them to you where they are safe in your tummies!

Where to start? I awoke today (Friday morning) to check on the three gopher traps I set in greenhouse #1 to stop the bugger from eating the potatoes and carrots that are days away from harvest. Instead of the happy sign of a snapped trap I found total devastation of the greenhouse. It literally looks like a war zone. The peas, the Chinese broccoli, the lettuce wiped out by the goats and sheep during the night. They broke through the chicken wire and ate everything. This is work we have been doing for four months and at least 4 weeks more of vegetables for all of you. The crops were at their peak. The snap peas 1-2 weeks from harvest in full bloom, the Chinese broccoli finally able to produce for everyone, all gone. There are no words to describe how I feel right now, completely defeated. We work from sunup to sun down , sometimes with a headlamp and it can all be eliminated in minutes to hours. This is not due to carelessness or laziness or error, it just sucks.

We are under attack from air, tunnel and above ground. The pests come in all sizes. There are root maggots, aphids, flea beetles, cucumber beetles, cut worms that we battle. There are our own rogue domestic animals from the dogs running in the fields, to the horse, the escaping chickens and the most heinous goats and sheep. No matter how hard we try to grow seeds, carefully transplant them , water and weed them, they are never safe or secure until you have eaten them.

I am not sure what we will do. . .

I am picking up two days later, it is now Mother’s Day 2016. Juve and I tied up the remaining peas in that greenhouse. We caught the blinking gopher (don’t know about his cousins)and we scrounged around for more lettuce. The broccoli is a total wash. We may be done for the season before we even got started. Juve managed to spend 2 full days fencing the goats in their pen and out in the field. They are being sent out for most of the day. If anyone wants to eat a goat they are for sale!

We have pieced together a nice harvest for today, it is full of greens and will be until the peas come on (if ever). The outside crops are coming, but we have a horrible wind today that is drying the ground after a 90 degree day yesterday, not good growing weather. The remainder of the week is hot, so we hope to be able to grow some good veggies. Farming is for the birds, but I guess we’ll keep plugging away.

To the topic of Mother’s Day. We wish all of you a very special day (everyday should be special). Mother’s make life possible, enjoy your mother today, make her feel loved. See you around the farm.

Raw Green Garlic Uses: mince and add to salads, pound into a paste to make green garlic aioli, use in salad dressings, sprinkle onto any creation using bread or noodles with cheese

Cooked Green Garlic Uses: Poach the last 4″ of the tips and dress with a mustard vinaigrette, dice and saute the tender portions and add to an omelet or frittata, chop and add to stir frys, chop and add to soup.

Green Garlic Soup Au Gratin

8 Stalks Green Garlic
1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Tablespoon Butter
2 Tablespoons Butter, plus 2 teaspoons Butter
8 sl Day-old Bread
1 1/4 c chicken or vegetable Broth
1/4 teaspoon Salt
1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
1/2 c Parmesan Cheese, grated

Remove and discard upper third of garlic stalks; (green leaf ends) thinly slice bulb. Heat olive oil and 1 T butter until beginning to foam. Add garlic; saute 1-2 minutes. Reduce heat, cover tightly, and cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Spread bread with 2 T butter; oven toast until lightly golden. Add broth to garlic, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Ladle into 2 oven-proof serving bowls; cover with toasted bread and top with cheese. Dot each with a teaspoon of butter. Bake at 450F for 10 minutes, until cheese has melted and begun to turn golden.

Orzo Pasta Risotto with Forest Mushrooms and Garlic Scapes

Chef Dante Boccuzzi of Aureole-New York, NY
Adapted by StarChefs.com

Yield: 4 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 onion, small diced
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil, plus another 3 Tablespoons
  • Salt and pepper
  • 8 ounces chicken stock
  • 1 pound orzo
  • 1 portabello mushroom
  • 3 shiitake mushrooms
  • 3 garlic scapes
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 3 Tablespoons heavy cream
  • 3 Tablespoons truffle butter
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus shavings
  • 3 ounces baby arugula

Method:
In a large pot over low heat, slowly cook the onion in 3 Tablespoons olive oil until it is translucent and tender. Season the onion with salt and pepper. In a separate saucepot bring the stock to a boil and keep hot. Add the orzo pasta to the onions and mix thoroughly. Gradually add the stock to the pasta and cover completely. Cook the pasta at a low simmer and stir carefully to avoid sticking.

In a large sauté pan heat 3 Tablespoons olive oil and sear the mushrooms and garlic scapes until golden brown. Add the butter. Let the butter become golden brown, then strain the mushrooms and scapes and reserve. In a cold bowl, whisk the heavy cream until slightly thick.

Cook the pasta until it is firm to the bite. Finish the pasta with truffle butter, Parmesan cheese, and the baby arugula. Add the heavy cream at the very end before serving. In a large bowl spoon the pasta into the center and place the mushrooms and scapes over the top. Shave a block of Parmesan cheese with a potato peeler to get thin shavings, and use them to garnish the dish.

Braised Chicken with Green Garlic
from Weir Cooking in the City by Joanne Weir

1 large chicken (about 4 pounds)
2 T butter
2 T olive oil
S and P
1 cup water
3-5 stalks green garlic, trimmed and cleaned as you would a leek, and chopped
1 1/4 cups white wine
1 1/2 cups chicken stock

Remove the wings from the chicken and discard. Cut the chicken into 8 pieces, each breast half cut crosswise into 2 pieces, 2 thighs, and 2 drumsticks.

Melt the butter in the olive oil in a large skillet over med-high heat. Working in batches if necessary, add the chicken, season with S and P, and cook until golden brown on one side, 6-8 minutes. Turn the chicken pieces and cook unti lgolden brown on the second side, another 6-8 minutes. Transfer chicken to aplatter; cover with foil, and keep warm. Pour the excess fat from the pan and discard.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the water and garlic, and cook until the garlic is soft and the water has almost evaporated, about 10 minutes. Add more water during cooking if necessary. Puree in a blender on high speed until very smooth; reserve.

Return the chicken to the pan and increase the heat to high. Add the white wine, chicken stock, and garlic paste and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover , and simmer until the chicken can be easily skewered, 20-25 minutes. Season with S & P.

Transfer the chicken to a platter and cover with foil. Over high heat, reduce the sauce until slightly thickened. Pour the sauce over the chicken and serve.

Serves 6.

Garlic Scape Hummus

Posted by Carole Koch

Thanks to Kelly Long, Illinois Benedictine University Dietetic Intern, for sharing this recipe!

2 cans of chick peas (garbanzos) drained
1 cup sesame seeds or tahini
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 cup fresh chopped garlic scapes

Place the ingredients in a blender on high until a thick paste forms. Salt to taste.
Optional: add your favorite curry, to taste.

 

Garlic Curl Pesto

Use as a dip, pasta sauce, pizza topping (after thinning with more oil) or on bagels. Also delicious in scrambled eggs! Appropriate for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch garlic curls (scapes)
  • 1/4 cup dry roasted peanuts or walnuts or pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese

Preparation

Chop garlic, puree in food processor or blender. Add nuts and puree. Add oil and cheese and puree.

Source: Adapted from Uncommon Fruits and Vegetables—A Common Sense Guide by Elizabeth Schneider

COLLARD GREENS MINIERA
1 1/4 lb collard greens, halved lengthwise and stems and center ribs discarded
3 slices bacon, finely chopped
Stack collard-leaf halves and roll crosswise into a cigar shape. Cut crosswise into very thin slices (no thicker than 3/4 inch) with a sharp knife.

Cook bacon in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderate heat, stirring, until crisp. Add collards, tossing to coat, and cook until just bright green, about 1 minute. Season with salt and serve immediately.

Gourmet
January 2001

Indian Spiced Kale and Chickpeas

 

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil                                                        3 cloves garlic, minced

1 11/2 pounds kale, ribs removed, coarsely chopped                           1 cup reduced sodium chicken broth

1 teaspoon ground coriander                                                ½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon garam masala                                                    ¼ teaspoon salt

1 can (15 oz.) chick peas, rinsed

 

Healt oil in a dutch oven over medium heat.  Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds.  Add kale and cook, tossing with two large spoons, until bright green, about 1 minute.  Add broth, spices and salt.  Cover and cook for about 8-10 minutes.  Stir in chickpeas; cover and cook unitl chickpeas are heated through, about 1-2 minutes.

 

 

 

HAM AND BLACK-EYED PEA SOUP WITH COLLARD GREENS
1 medium onion
1 garlic clove
a 4-ounce piece cooked ham
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 pound collard greens
1 cup chicken broth (8 fluid ounces)
3 cups water
a 16-ounce can black-eyed peas (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 teaspoon cider vinegar
Chop onion and garlic and cut ham into 1/4-inch dice. In a 3-quart saucepan cook onion, garlic, and ham in oil over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until onion is pale golden.

While onion mixture is cooking, discard stems and center ribs from collards and finely chop leaves. Add collards, broth, and water to onion mixture and simmer until collards are tender, about 20 minutes.

Rinse and drain black-eyed peas. In a bowl mash half of peas with a fork. Stir mashed and whole peas into soup and simmer 5 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper and stir in vinegar.

Gourmet
December 1998

 

Kale with Garlic and Bacon

1 slice of bacon chopped (I use pancetta)

1 garlic clove

6 cups (or what you have) chopped kale, washed

1 cup water (I used chicken broth)

 

In al large heavy skillet cook the bacon over the moderate heat, stirring, until it is crisp and transfer it to paper towels to drain.  In te fat remaining in the skillet cook the garlic, stirring, until it is golden, add the kale and the water and simmer the mixture, covered for 10 minutes or until the kale is wilted and tender.  Simmer the mixture, uncovered until most of the liquid is evaporated, add the bacon, salt and pepper to taste.  Serves 2.

 

 

Kale Salad (from Kris Schamp)

 

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

 

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

 

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

 

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

 

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

 

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  Can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

 

 

Whole-Wheat Penne With Walnut Pesto and Kale

Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Lacinato kale, also called Tuscan, black or dinosaur kale, is narrow leafed, dark blue-green and crinkly. Other varieties of kale may be substituted if lacinato is unavailable. Be sure not to toast the nuts too long; burned nuts will make the pesto taste very acrid. Whole-wheat pasta varies widely in flavor and texture; Imported Bionaturale brand, which is sold at New Seasons Markets, is one of my favorites. If you prefer, regular pasta may be substituted for whole-wheat.

  • 11/2 cups walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped (divided; see note)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
  • Pinch granulated sugar
  • 1 cup finely grated parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces), plus additional for serving
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 bunches fresh lacinato kale, stemmed, coarsely chopped and rinsed well
  • 1 pound whole-wheat penne rigate pasta

Combine 1 cup walnuts, garlic, thyme and pinch sugar in food processor and process until evenly ground, about 15 seconds. Add cheese and oil and process just until blended, about 4 seconds, scraping down sides of work bowl as necessary. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper; set pesto aside.

In a large pot, bring 4 quarts of water to a boil, add salt and greens and cook until tender, about 4 minutes. Leaving the boiling water on the heat, use tongs or long-handled strainer to transfer greens to large bowl of cold water to stop cooking. When greens are cool, drain and squeeze firmly between hands to remove excess moisture. Coarsely chop greens and set aside.

Add pasta to the boiling water and cook according to directions on package. Drain pasta through colander, reserving 1/2 cup pasta water. Return pasta to pot and toss with pesto until well-coated. Add reserved pasta water, as necessary, to moisten pasta. Using tongs, distribute cooked greens through pasta; season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide pasta among bowls and serve garnished with remaining 1/2 cup walnuts and additional grated parmesan as desired. Note: To toast nuts, spread on baking sheet and bake in 350-degree oven for 5 to 8 minutes or until they start to brown.

 

Kale Omelete

By the Armard Family

 

INGREDIENTS

 

– as much kale as you could get with two hands together (as a buch) after it has been chopped (aprox. 2 cups)

– Olive oil (2-3 tablespoons)

– One small well-chopped clove of garlic

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 1/4 cup of feta or chevre cheese (small pieces)

– 1 small-medium riped tomato or 4-5 cherry tomatoes (chopped)

– Fresh black pepper

– 3 eggs

– Finely chopped basil or parsley

 

PROCEDURES

 

– Stir the eggs very well with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and black pepper in a bowl. Set aside

– Heat the olive oil at medium-high and when hot add the kale and the chopped garlic. Cook until kale is soft stirring constantly. Don’t overcook. Then take out

– Reduce the fire to low-medium (let the pan cool down a little first), re-stir the eggs and poor them on the pan (use more olive oil if needed before adding the eggs)

– Immediately add the cooked kale/garlic, the chopped tomatoes, the cheese and the remaining salt

– Cover for about a minute with a lid

– Fold or whatever you prefer or can do (fritatta Vs. Omelette)

– Take out and add some chopped parsley or basil on top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #4

Week #4

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Dill or sage
  • Green garlic
  • Lettuce mix
  • Walnuts
  • Chinese broccoli or Bok Choi or radish or turnip (not sure what to do with those delicious turnips and their greens? See recipe below!

The weeds are starting to get really annoying. It is crunch time with those buggers. Our horrid grass plague is really going wild, popping up everywhere. It is not too hard to pull out right now, but that is by hand. With a hoe it is much harder as it can be deep and clumped. Juve is stretched thin with fencing for the goats and sheep, feeding the wide variety of animals we have and weeding, tilling etc. I am planting every chance I get and trying to keep up with seeding and transplanting and weeding when I get a chance.

I spent the last two days in Corvallis with Diego at OSU Mom’s weekend. It was a blast, mainly just being with Diego hanging out and walking a ton (33,600 steps yesterday and > 15,000 today). We hit up the local farmer’s market, I bought tons of plants, wait don’t I sell plants? It was just a great time to be together. I came home late this afternoon and loaded the van for the plant sale at Catlin Gable School tomorrow morning. Polly and I have been planting every week since February and it is so rewarding to see them (our seedlings) so beautiful and ready to go into people’s gardens. I will be at Catlin Gable from 12- 4 tomorrow. Polly will be selling at Ben and Jerry’s on Hawthorne with the Birthing Way Midwifery School from 11- 4.

We start at the Beaverton Farmers Market next Saturday May 7th from 8 – 1:30. Please do come and see me at either location. We have a huge variety of veggie, flower and herb starts available. We have everything from peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, basil, beans, corn, broccoli and much much more. You can also order directly from us at the farm from the list of starts I sent out earlier last month.

I hope to get the squash and pumpkins seeded this week. I have tons of flowers to get transplanted out into the field as well as the remainder of the onions, the first beans and more cukes. It is a great time of year if only we could work 24 hours a day. I am going to head to bed so I can rise early to get the harvest mostly done prior to heading to Catlin. Enjoy your veggies, peas and carrots are not far off.

Mom’s Rhubarb Coffee Cake

1 cup brown sugar

½ cup soft butter

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups fresh rhubarb cut in 1 inch pieces

2 cups unbleached flour (can use Namaste gluten free flour)

1 teaspoon baking soda (increase by ½ teaspoon if making gluten free)

1 teaspoon cinnamon

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk or soy milk (tofu sour cream with soy milk ½ and ½)

Topping:

½ cup soft butter

½ cup brown sugar

½ cup shredded coconut

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

  1. In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar together. Add the egg and vanilla and mix well.
  2. In another bowl, combine ½ cup flour with the rhubarb and mix to coat the fruit with the flour, set aside.
  3. In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the remaining flour and other dry ingredients. Mix well.
  4. In a small bowl, mix the topping ingredients with a fork or pastry cutter. Set aside.
  5. Add the dry ingredients, alternating the milk to the egg mixture. Mix just until combined. Fold the rhubarb into the batter and pour into a lightly oiled 9 X 13 inch baking pan. Sprinkle the topping over this and bake for 45 minutes or until a wooden skewer comes out of the center clean. Allow to cool slightly before cutting.

 

Spinach Salad with toasted Seeds

½ # spinach

3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms

1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds

½ toasted sunflower seeds

¼ cup toasted sesame seeds

1 cup thinly sliced red pepper

Dressing:

¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

¼ cup white wine vinegar

1 tablespoon honey

2 teaspoons of crushed garlic

2 teaspoons prepared Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon mayonnaise

Salt and pepper to taste

  1. Mix all the dressing ingredients together in a blender or with a whisk
  2. In a bowl toss the fresh spinach with the mushrooms and bell pepper and toasted seeds. Dress and serve immediately garnish with sliced red pepper.

 

 

MORROCAN TURNIP AND CHICKEN STEW

 

 

2 cups cooked chickpeas

2 small (2 1/2 lb) chickens

3 Tb butter

1 Tb oil

2 onions

5 cups chicken stock

1/2 tsp white pepper

1/4 tsp ground ginger

1/8 tsp powdered saffron

1/2 tsp turmeric

1 lb small turnips

2 cups chopped turnip leaves and stems

1/4 cup lemon juice

salt and freshly ground pepper

 

 

 

Rinse chickpeas in water and rub lightly to remove skins; drain and set aside. Cut chickens into quarters, removing wing tips and backbones; put them aside for stock. Melt butter and oil in a casserole and lightly brown chicken on all sides, cooking in two batches if necessary. Slice onions and stir into butter and oil to color. Then add the chickpeas, stock, pepper, ginger, saffron, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add turnips and greens and simmer 20 minutes more. Remove chicken and turnips to a covered warm dish. Boil sauce to reduce, mashing some of the chickpeas against the side of the pan to thicken the sauce; it may take 10-15 minutes to produce a nice thick sauce. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Reheat the chicken and turnips in the sauce and serve.   Serves 6 to 8.  From The Victory Garden Cookbook.

Lemon –Lentil Soup

3 tablespoons olive oil or safflower oil

2 cups diced onions

2 tablespoons crushed garlic

1 ½ cups freshly diced carrots

1 cup diced potatoes

2 bay leaves

1 cup diced celery

1 cup dry red lentils (I would use the small French green lentils)

5 cups water or stock

¼ cup lemon juice

2 tablespoons fresh dill

4 cups packed fresh greens (spinach, kale or chard)

  1. In a soup pot sauté the onions, garlic, carrots, and potatoes with the bay leaves in oil, just until the potatoes begin to soften about 15 minutes
  2. Rinse and check the lentils for stones.
  3. Add the celery and lentils to the soup pot and continue to sauté for about 5 minutes. Add the water or stock and reduce the heat to medium, Cover and simmer until the lentils and the vegetables are tender approximately 15 minutes.
  4. Just before serving, remove from the heat and stir in the lemon juice, chopped dill and greens. Stir until the greens have wilted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

 

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Week #3

Week #3

  • Salad Mix – enjoy this tender salad mix of buttery lettuce. Wash her well as tiny slugs like to hide between the leaves
  • Shallots – use as you would onions, or if you find them building up week to week, peel them and cut them in half and roast them with a drizzle of olive oil and salt and pepper at 350 degrees for 45-60 minutes and they become like caramel!
  • Spinach – the intimidating large leaves cook down to a manageable size. Enjoy spinach simple steamed, sautéed or in soup (check out the recipe below.
  • Baby beets or chard – eat the beet greens as you would chard, steam, sauté or braise, see recipe below
  • Kale – there are so many ways to enjoy this healthy green
  • Chinese broccoli or bok choi
  • Cauliflower – the last until June, so enjoy!

How appropriate that on this week of Passover and the recounting of the 10 plagues we find a new (old but forgotten) plague. The Chinese broccoli is just getting started and we have been noting some dying plants. We were thinking that a nasty gopher was munching it from below until I pulled out a plant and found a tiny cluster of root maggots completely demolishing the base of each dying plant. Ugh! How to treat a plague that is below ground? It is mainly in one bed of broccoli and one greenhouse but a very disturbing finding. Story to be continued.

On the sunny side, our peas are in full bloom in the greenhouse and we have two beds in the field that have enjoyed the reprieve from the hot weather and have taken off with the rain. We should have sugar snaps in the next few weeks. We continue to prep and plant as our spring crops take off our summer crops are getting ready to be planted after the cold nights predicted this week. We will seed winter squash this week and plan to get it in to the nicely made beds by mid May.

The greenhouse tomatoes are starting to green up (get established). We planted hot peppers in the hoop house as well as basil. The sweet peppers should get planted as soon as they are sized up so they can withstand pest pressure. I dared to put in a bed of cucumbers in the greenhouse, this might be foolish, but it might pay off with early cukes. We will have to see, farming is like gambling, sometimes you win and sometimes you loose. My strategy is to keep on planting and try to beat the plagues!

We have some veggies starts we will put out today. If you want specific items please do fill out the form I sent last week and I will gather them for you for pick up in May. I can seed special items for you but I need some lead time. I am off to harvest now, see you around the farm.

Bittman curry creamed spinach w/potato crust. (4-6 svgs)

3 Lbs spinach or other greens, trimmed
2 tbs butter
2 tsp garam masala or curry powder
1/4 tsp nutmeg
2 c coconut milk
1/2 c yogurt
(1 brick extra firm tofu cut into 1/2″ cubes- I didn’t do this)
1 large russet potato, thinly sliced
2 tbs olive oil
Salt, pepper

1. Preheat oven to 425. blanch greens by dropping in salted boiling water x 1 minute, then plunge into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking, drain and squeeze out excess moisture. roughly chop.

2.melt butter and garam masalas and nutmeg in large skillet until fragrant, then add coconut milk, yogurt, spinach, tofu, and tsp salt. Bring to a oil, stirring at times until bulk of the liquid is absorbed. Transfer to oven proof dish.

3. Toss the potato slices with oil, salt, pepper, then lay over the spinach in a single layer. Bake until the potatoes are golden and crisp.

 

White House No-Cream Creamed Spinach

Published May 25, 2010

Makes 6 servings

This side dish is one of Michelle Obama’s favorites because it has a creamy texture without a lot of calories and fat. One person who’s not a fan, however, is Sasha Obama, who is turned off by the bright green color — a shade of the vegetable rainbow she has yet to embrace.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds baby spinach
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 shallots, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

Wash and clean the spinach. Place a large bowl of water near the sink, and put several handfuls of ice cubes in it. Place a colander in the sink.

Fill a medium-sized pot with water, and sprinkle in some salt. Place the pot on the stove and bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add 8 ounces of the spinach (about a quarter of the leaves) and let it boil for just 30 seconds.

Carefully pour the spinach and water into the colander to drain the spinach. Then, using tongs or a fork to handle the hot spinach, immediately “shock” the spinach by putting it into the ice water to stop the cooking process. Let the spinach sit in the cold water for a minute, then drain it again in the colander. Squeeze the spinach with your hands or press the spinach against the colander with the back of a spoon to remove excess water.

Place the cooked spinach in a blender and purée. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add shallots and garlic and cook until the shallots turn translucent, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the rest of the spinach leaves, tossing with a spoon and sautéing until the leaves are wilted. Add the puréed spinach and stir. Season with salt and pepper.

Adapted from White House Executive Chef Cristeta Comerford

 

 

 

Spinach and Lentils

The Asian Cook Book

 

Serves 4

Generous 1 cup yellow split lentils, rinsed                                 ¼ tsp ground asafetida (?)

5 cups water                                                                                        ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon ground coriander                                                          1 tsp ground cumin

9 oz. fresh spinach leaves, thick stems removed, sliced and  rinsed

4 scallions

To garnish:

3 tbsp vegetable oil or peanut oil

1tsp mustard seeds

2 fresh chilies, split length wise

½ inch piece fresh gingerroot, very finely chopped

 

Put the lentils and water in a large pan over high heat.  Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to the lowest setting, and skim the surface as necessary.

 

When the foam stops rising, stir in the ground coriander, cumin, asafetida, and turmeric.  Half-cover the pan and let the lentils simmer for 40 minutes or until they are very tender and only a thin layer of liquid is left on top.

Stir the spinach and scallions into the lentils and continue simmering for another 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the spinach is wilted.  If the water evaporates before the spinach is cooked, stir in al little extra.  Add salt to taste.  Transfer the lentils to a serving dish.

To make the garnish, heat the oil in a small pan over high heat.  Add the mustard seeds, chilies gingerroot and stir until the mustard seeds begin to pop and the chilies sizzle.  Pour the oil and spices over the lentils and serve.

 

Cook’s tip:  The exact amount of water needed depends primarily on how old the lentils are, but also on the size of the pan.  The older the lentils are, the longer simmering they will require to become tender.  Unfortunately, there isn’t any way to determine the age when you buy lentils, so be prepared to add extra water and increase the cooking time.  Also, remember, the wider the pan the quicker the water will evaporate.

Kale Omelete

By the Armard Family

 

INGREDIENTS

 

– as much kale as you could get with two hands together (as a buch) after it has been chopped (aprox. 2 cups)

– Olive oil (2-3 tablespoons)

– One small well-chopped clove of garlic

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 1/4 cup of feta or chevre cheese (small pieces)

– 1 small-medium riped tomato or 4-5 cherry tomatoes (chopped)

– Fresh black pepper

– 3 eggs

– Finely chopped basil or parsley

 

PROCEDURES

 

– Stir the eggs very well with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and black pepper in a bowl. Set aside

– Heat the olive oil at medium-high and when hot add the kale and the chopped garlic. Cook until kale is soft stirring constantly. Don’t overcook. Then take out

– Reduce the fire to low-medium (let the pan cool down a little first), re-stir the eggs and poor them on the pan (use more olive oil if needed before adding the eggs)

– Immediately add the cooked kale/garlic, the chopped tomatoes, the cheese and the remaining salt

– Cover for about a minute with a lid

– Fold or whatever you prefer or can do (fritatta Vs. Omelette)

– Take out and add some chopped parsley or basil on top

STIR-FRIED CHINESE BROCCOLI
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, smashed
2 lb Chinese broccoli (sometimes known as Chinese kale), ends of stems trimmed and broccoli cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup Thai chicken stock or canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons Thai yellow bean sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 teaspoons sugar

Special equipment: a large (6-qt) wok
Heat oil in wok over high heat until hot but not smoking, then stir-fry garlic until pale golden, 10 to 15 seconds. Add broccoli and stock and stir-fry 2 minutes. Add bean sauce, oyster sauce, and sugar and stir-fry until broccoli is crisp-tender, 4 to 5 minutes.

Cooks’ note:
Broccoli can be trimmed and cut 6 hours ahead and chilled in a sealed plastic bag.

Gourmet
May 2004

Roasted Beets and Braised Beet tops with Canellini Beans(serves 4)

 

2 bunches medium beets with tops

1 medium red onion, cut into thin (1/4 – inch) wedges

water

3 T extra virgin olive oil

2 T red wine vinegar

1 t dried oregano or 2 t fresh oregano leaves, minced

½ t Kosher salt

½ t minced garlic

Freshly ground pepper

1  15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinced

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cut grenn tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch of stem attached.  Set greens aside to be used fro Braising Beet tops.

 

Wash beets and dry.  Wrap each bet tightly in a square of foil and rasp until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 1 hour or more, depending on size.  Cool, unwrap foil and rub off outside skin.  Trim and discard stems and ends, and cut beets into ½ inch wedges.  Set aside separately until ready to serve.  Strain any juices left in foil into a small bowl and reserve.

Place onion wedges in a small bowl and cover with cold water.  Add a handful of ice cubes and let stand until ready to use. To make Braised Beet Tops, wash beet tops in several changes of water, trim stems and coarsely chop leaves into 2 inch pieces.  There should be about 8 cups, or 1 pound, lightly packed.  Heat 2 cups water to boiling in a large, broad saucepan.  Stir in beet greens and cook until wilted and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.  Drain well, cool and then press lightly on greens with back of spoon to remove excess moisture.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, reserved beet juices, oregano, garlic, and salt and pepper to taste until well blended.  Measure out 1 Tablespoon and add it to the beet wedges.  Toss to combine.

Remove ice cubes and drain water from onion.  Add onion to dressing along with cooked beet greens and beans.  Toss gently to blend.  Spoon into a serving bowl and arrange beet wedges around edges and on top.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

Roasted Beets and Braised Beet tops with Canellini Beans(serves 4)

 

2 bunches medium beets with tops

1 medium red onion, cut into thin (1/4 – inch) wedges

water

3 T extra virgin olive oil

2 T red wine vinegar

1 t dried oregano or 2 t fresh oregano leaves, minced

½ t Kosher salt

½ t minced garlic

Freshly ground pepper

1  15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinced

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cut grenn tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch of stem attached.  Set greens aside to be used fro Braising Beet tops.

 

Wash beets and dry.  Wrap each bet tightly in a square of foil and raso until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 1 hour or more, depending on size.  Cool, unwrat foil and rub off outside skin.  Trim and discard stems and ends, and cut beets into ½ inch wedges.  Set aside separately until ready to serve.  Strain any juices left in foil into a small bowl and reserve.

Place onion wedges in a small bowl and cover with cold water.  Add a handful of ice cubes and let stand until ready to use.To make Braised Beet Tops, wash beet tops in serveral changes of water, trim stems and coarsely chop leaves into 2 inch pieces.  Ther should be about 8 cups, or 1 pound, lightly packed.  Heat 2 cups water to boilingin a large, broad saucepan.  Stir in beet greens and cook until wilted and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.  Drain well, cool and then press lightly on greens with back of spoon to remove excess moisture.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, reserved beet juices, oregano, garlic, and salt and pepper to taste until well blended.  Measure out 1 Tablespoon and add it to the beet wedges.  Toss to combine.

Remove ice cubes and drain water from onion.  Add onion to dresing along with cooked beet greens and beans.  Toss gently to blend.  Spoon into a serving bowl and arrange beet wedges around edges and on top.  Serve warm or at room tempurature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #2

Week #2 2016

Salad Mix – Salanova lettuce from Johnnys’ saves the day. The little lettuces that held on during the flood that ran through the greenhouse in March, have made nice heads with many leaves. Enjoy the mix! Good bye bitter endive!

Bok choi – another early season powerhouse! Sweet and young, eat it now before the on slot of flea beetles turn the leaves to lace.

Cauliflower or Chinese Broccoli – the cauliflower is almost finished and the Chinese Broccoli is just starting. The Chinese Broccoli is special because the stems and leaves are part of the deliciousness. Sautee the whole thing with garlic and a dash of soy sauce and eat over rice.

Kale – amazing stuff, just pumping out the leaves, thank you super food. Enjoy it weekly (we eat it daily!) some of our favorite recipes are listed below, many more on the website.

Spinach – Osbourne seed company has a winner with this very dark green spinach. The vitamins are surging through the leaves and will contribute to your health. Try Polly’s recipe below for Saag, with or without the lamb.

Shallots – held over from last season, strong and flavorful, use as you would an onion.

Walnuts – our grand old tree did well last season. Thanks to all the hands that went into gathering them. Most are in great condition, some are not, hard to tell until you crack them, so enjoy.

We have been busy this week. Juve tilled the main fields just before the rain and the soil was perfect. We planted more sugar snaps along with shallots, green onions, broccoli, cabbage, kohlrabi, and parsley. We managed to get in our early tomatoes in the greenhouse, four beds this year. With the nice rain last week the weeds will be close on our heels.

There was quite the demand for pork, all our piglets are spoken for. We still have beef and possible a lamb. Contact Juve to reserve your meat. The beef may be butchered in the early summer or fall, the pork by the end of summer.

We will have vegetable starts. I sent a list with the weekly email. You can either send me and email, leave me a note or text me. I will have starts available beginning to mid May. I have some kale, shallots and sugar snaps right now, available in the barn. Come see me at Catlin Gable School on May 1, I will be selling all the starts we grow. The Beaverton Farmers Market opens on May 7 and runs through October. Come see me on Saturdays 8 – 1:30, I sell with Pumpkin Ridge Gardens.

Off to harvest

 

 

Kale Salad (from Kris Schamp)

(A brief note: I use just kale, and red onion most of the time and it is delicious, this dressing recipe works well on most spicy greens like arugula and mustard as well)

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

 

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

 

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

 

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

 

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

 

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  You can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

Chinese Broccoli

(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)

1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem

2-4 cloves of garlic minced

1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce

¼ cup water

Olive oil

Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

 

 

Baked Crispy Kale Recipe

 

Servings:  4 as snack Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 20

The biggest secret to getting the kale super-crisp is to dry them in a salad spinner. If there is moisture on the leaves, the kale will steam, not crisp. Also, do not salt the kale until after they have come out of the oven. If you salt beforehand, the salt will just cause the kale to release moisture…thus steaming instead of crisping. I’ve also found that the convection setting on my oven works really well too – I set the convection on 325F and bake for about 10-15 minutes. Have fun with this recipe, I sometimes mix the salt with Cajun or Creole seasoning.

Ingredients:

4 giant handfuls of kale, torn into bite-sized pieces and tough stems removed (about 1/3 pound)

1-2 tablespoons olive oil

sea salt or kosher salt

(I like to grate parmesan or romano cheese over them before baking)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

 

  1. Place the kale leaves into a salad spinner and spin all of the water out of the kale. Dump the water and repeat one or two times more just to make sure that the kale is extra dizzy and dry. Use a towel to blot any extra water on the leaves. Place the kale on the baking sheet.

 

  1. Drizzle olive oil over the kale leaves and use your hands to toss and coat the leaves. Bake in the oven for 12-20 minutes until leaves are crisp. Take a peek at the 12 minute mark – the timing all depends on how much olive oil you use. Just use a spatula or tongs to touch the leaves, if they are paper-thin crackly, the kale is done. If the leaves are still a bit soft, leave them in for another 2 minutes. Do not let the leaves turn brown (they’ll be burnt and bitter) Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and serve.

LAMB SAAG

  • 4 lamb shanks
  • 2-3 Lbs. spinach
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 Tbs. ghee (or butter and oil mixed)
  • 1 tsp. brown mustard seed
  • 1/8 tsp. asafetida
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne
  • ½ tsp. ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. grated nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 3 Tbs. water
  • 3 Tbs. cream (or use sour cream or yogurt)
  • 2 tsp. salt

Cover lamb shanks with water in a large pot.  Add 1 tsp. salt and bring to a boil.  Simmer until the lamb is starting to loosen from the bone.  If you have time, put boiled lamb shanks onto the grill to brown.  Chop lamb and set aside.

Meanwhile, wash spinach and strip leaves off of stems.  Chop coarsely.  Combine cayenne, coriander, black pepper, nutmeg, turmeric and cumin in a small bowl, add water, and stir well.  Melt the butter and oil (or ghee) in a 5-quart pan over moderate heat.  Add mustard seed and cook until it starts to pop.  Add asafetida and let it sizzle, then add spice mixture and onion.  Fry for about 2 minutes.

Add spinach to pan, sprinkle with 1 tsp. salt.  Cover and reduce heat.  Stir occasionally until spinach is all bright green and very wilted.  Add water if necessary.  At this point, the saag can be removed from heat and can sit if necessary.  Before serving, put spinach in a food processor and puree.  Return it to the pan, add chopped lamb, stir in cream and reheat briefly.

Adapted from The Best of Lord Krishna’s Cuisine by Yamuna Devi.

by Tori Ritchie

 

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2016 Season Opens!!

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Week #1, 2016

  • Salad mix – these are the bitter greens of They require a nice dressing and some good cheese, either blue, gorgonzola, parmesan, or manchego to cut the bitter. (some recipes are listed below).  If it is too bitter for you super tasters don’t dismay, you will be forgiven for not eating it and adding it to your compost.
  • Shallots – nice and spicy held over from last years harvest, great in soups
  • Swiss Chard – a nice mild green to use in stir fry or in your morning smoothie.
  • Spinach – take not of the intense color, full of vitamins and cooks down to a reasonable amount!
  • Leeks – nice to use the white parts and some of the pale green in soups
  • Cauliflower – this is the last of the overwintering wonder. We planted these in August of last year and the plants held in the field all winter. In February they started to grow and headed up over the last few weeks. Enjoy them roasted (our favorite) with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Sprouting broccoli – a seasonal favorite that peaked in March. We have a bit left for you, but we can’t control mother nature so more than 200 feet of broccoli went to waste L
  • Radishes or arugula – you choose one to add to your salad this week.

The day has finally come! We are so excited to open our 17th season of growing vegetables. The time has flown by and we have learned so many things and there remain so many mysteries! We had a mild but wet winter with this beautiful dry warm spell that has put us ahead of schedule. From my notes over the years there are warnings not to plant in early April! “Don’t be fooled it can and likely will still freeze until after May 15th”, my scribbles say. But, we jumped ahead and have our entire upper field planted with frost tolerant plants, the rain this week is welcome and hopefully it won’t get too cold.

The greenhouses are full of growing plants despite the rivers that ran through many of them in March. The lettuce is almost ready for salad mix, the Chinese broccoli is starting to form it’s first stalks and the kale is oh so close. This week you will eat mainly what has survived the winter. Next week you will eat the late winter planting of spring crops. This time of year is full of flavors, many bitter and then sweet. They are all good for us, some need a little doctoring to make them more palatable.

We have many baby animals at this time of year. The lambs and kids are jumping all around and their mamas are making nice rich milk. Juvencio tries to find time to fence for them to graze out in the field, but his time is like gold (el tiempo es oro) not enough in the day to get it all done. Soon they will spend their days out in the field and be brought in at night so the coyotes don’t get them. We have 8 weaner pigs as well, black and spunky.

With all the new life we also have loss. Yesterday we said good-bye to our loyal Pepito. He has been a great dog, so loveable and good hearted always there to greet people. He died of old age accelerated by a life of jumping and hard work on the farm (although the last few years he was not working that hard it took a toll on his body). We also said good bye to our old mare Victoria. She passed earlier this week. Her son, Venture, the Morgan gelding is struggling without her and is kind of at a loss. She was very old but survived here on the farm for over three years. Life marches on.

Zuko, our newest dog has grown some, but to our dismay he seems to be a “mini” cattle dog. He is still young and needs to be taught not to jump and heard people. Please do encourage him not to jump and lick little ones in the face. He loves to be pet and is anxious for attention. Fiora, our border collie mix is our best working dog, she herds the sheep and goats and tries to catch the gophers. She is very friendly when not distracted by her “work”. Oliver, now the eldest of our dogs at 6 is a tough Napoleon complexed rat terrier. He has gotten more friendly, but on his own terms, so pet him when he comes to you, and let him be when he is standoffish.

 

Our season opening potluck starts today at 2:00 and runs until 6:00. Please drop in and enjoy the food, music and a tour of the farm. Part of what makes La Finquita different is the community we strive to create among our subscribers. You will have the opportunity to meet like minded (or at least like eaters) people who are committed to eating seasonal, local food grown with care and consideration for the environment and the people who will be consuming those vegetables. The pizza oven will be fired up and you can build your own pizza. BYOB, and pizza topping. See the attached flyer for full details.

 

We still have space for more subscribers and we know from experience that the best subscribers come from current subscribers, so tell your friends! This is a unique opportunity to see where your veggies are grown. We have a veggie pool that helps people who live in Portland get there veggie dropped in their neighborhood and reduces the number of visits one has to make to the farm. Spread the word and have people contact us via email: lynjuve@msn.com or call or text my cell phone: 503-568-5760.

 

We look forward to getting to know each of you over the course of the season. Please do let us know if there is something you want us to grow or if something is not to your liking so that we can try and meet your needs. We want happy subscribers and we want you to eat your veggies every day!

 

 

 

Spinach Soup

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is still delicious!)

  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 small carrot
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • ½ cup parsley leaves
  • 2 bunches young spinach
  • 2 sprigs fresh tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraiche
  • Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin. Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

Serves 6

Garbanzos y Acelgas

Chickpeas and chard (or spinach)

9 ounces of dried chickpeas

1 carrot, diced

1 sprig flat leaf parsley

1 bay leaf

2 yellow onions 1/3 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

9 ounces or 1 bunch chard, beet greens or spinach (more is even better)

2 eggs (hard boiled or fried and placed on top of each portion)

Put the chickpeas in a bowl, cover with cold water and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and put in a large saucepan with the carrot, parsley, bay leaf and half the chopped onion. Cover with water then bring to a boil and cook about 20 minutes or until almost tender. Add 2 teaspoons salt and half the oil and cook for another 10 minutes. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and cook the garlic and remaining onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomato and cook for 5 minutes. Stir the tomato mixture into the chickpea mixture (it should be wet enough to be saucy but not too soupy). Stir in the chard, beet greens or spinach. Cook for 5 minutes or until the greens are tender. Season well and serve with either the hard boiled egg or fried egg on top.

Serves 4

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

 

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

Radish Top Soup

 

Don’t through out your radish greens.  Believe it or not, those fuzzy leaves can be transformed into a smooth green soup, with a hint of watercress flavor.

 

6 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onions or white part of leek

8 cups loosely packed radish leaves

2 cups diced potatoes

6 cups liquid (water, chicken stock or combo)

salt

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

freshly ground pepper

 

Melt 4 T butter in a large saucepan, add onions or leeks and cook until golden, approximately 5 minutes.  Stir in radish tops cover pan and cook over low heat until wilted, 8-10 minutes.  Meanwhile cook potatoes until soft in liquid along with 1 teaspoon of salt.  Combine with the radish tops and cook covered, for 5 minutes to mingle flavors.  Puree finely in a food processor of food mill.  Ad the cream if desired and enrich with 2 T of butter.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve hot. (serves 4-6)

Favorite Escarole Salad as Martin prepares it:

4 heads escarole, dark outer leaves removed, washed and torn into large bowl. Dress with: olive oil, sherry or champagne vinegar, shaved parmesan, S & P, and truffle oil. this is very very delicious.

Wilted Escarole

3 T olive oil
2 medium escarole – rinsed, dried and chopped
1/2 cup lemon juice
chopped zest from one lemon
2 tablespoons capers, roughly/barely chopped
10 dark, pitted olives, kalamata are good here
ground black pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large frying pan over high heat. Add escarole; cook and stir until greens begin to wilt. Stir in lemon juice & zest. Add capers, S & P, and olives; cook and stir for another 15-30 seconds.

Blanched Escarole with Fried Capers

from 366 Healthful Ways to Cook Leafy Greens by Linda Romanelli Leahy

1 bunch escarole (about 1 pound), trimmed and shredded
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted capers, drained
1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper
2 teaspoons thinly sliced lemon zest for garnish, optional

  1. Drop the escarole in a pot of salted boiling water. Cook 3 to 5 minutes until it is as tender as you like. Drain well.
    2. While the escarole is cooking, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the capers and cook 2 minutes; remove with a slotted spoon.
    3. Stir in the drained escarole, salt and pepper and heat through. Place on a serving plate and top with the capers and lemon zest, if using. Serve immediately. Serves 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March update! One month to the start of 2016 season

The beginning of the 2016 season is just around the corner. We have our opening pot luck set for April 10th 2- 6 p.m.. The first harvest begins that week April 11 or 15 depending on your pick up day. We have been hard at work planting the greenhouses to ready ourselves for the season. Unfortunately after last night’s rain we lost half of one of the fully planted greenhouses to flood. The torrential rains of the last 5 days culminated in over 2.5 inches into already saturated land. The rain from the fields to the east of our farm drain to the west of us and the gopher holes served as conduits for that water. Lettuce, kale and peas took the brunt of the flooding. We will try and replant but much of the work we started on 1/18/16 has been washed into the culvert.

Several new plagues have appeared in Oregon in the last year and are spreading over the Willamette Valley. There is the threat of black leg fungus and white spot fungus, affecting the kale, broccoli, and radish families. We have had to find ways to treat these seed born illnesses in hot water treatment baths prior to planting the seeds. There is a new caterpillar which grows fast and is ravenous. It eats just about everything including grass but loves everything on the farm. We lost much of our soft fruit (cherries were particularly hard hit this past year) due to the new fruit fly. The problem with farming is that there is always some new threat out there making the already difficult task of farming harder.

Juve brought home 8 new weaner piglets yesterday. We have 11 lambs and about 14 kids (we have lost track). Juve is determined to diminish our cattle herd by half (he has had to travel to McMinnville  three times a week all winter!) so there will be plenty of grass fed beef for sale. He is anxious to get your deposit for 1/2 – whole a hog, a whole lamb and  1/4 – 1/2 a steer. The deposit for each is $100. They will go to the butcher this summer or early fall.

As soon as I can figure out how to load my pictures to my ridiculous new office 365 (I hate microsoft!) I will get photos posted of the lambs, goats and the river running through the greenhouse. Please contact us ASAP if you are interested in 2016 season, we still have space and want to welcome you to our community.

 

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Happy New Year!!

Happy New Years from your farmers at La Finquita del Buho. It is currently snowing and even seems to be sticking! The weather service says 1-3 inches. That amount is fine, but more than 4 inches can threaten our hoop houses. With both our boys back at college, we have less hands on deck to deal with a weather emergency. It looks like by 7 pm it will start to melt.

We are still getting seed orders filled out and strategizing about the 2016 season. By the end of the month it is time to seed onions, peas, and all sorts of other winter harder greens. This is really my last weekend to “play” as I set out the schedule for the remaining weeks of winter. We did manage to leave our farm for 6 days on a trip to sunny southern California. We played at the San Diego Zoo and Wild Animal Park. We dove into the 60 degree Del Mar Ocean and enjoyed walks in the many botanical gardens at Balboa Park. We missed our veggies and grass fed beef and the amazing foodie scene here in Portland. We did have all sorts of tacos and margueritas without finding a truly super location. The best thing was to spend time as a family and time with our good friends Walter, Susan and Elias.

I just updated the website with dates for start and finish of the season. I adjusted prices to account for the ever escalating price of seeds, soil amendments and organic pest protection. We look forward to improving what we offer and trying new varieties of old favorites. We appreciated the input from subscribers about what went well and what we could change. Some of the suggestions will guide us as we map out this coming season. In order for us to plan for the future we need to know if you are in or out for 2016. We require a deposit of $100 to reserve your spot. You can choose to pay in full or pay as you go. We have broken it down as usual:

  • $100 deposit due on sign –up
  • $390 due by May 1
  • $390 due by August 1
  • $880 for the season, $860 if you pay in full by April 15th.
  • Send enrollment form and your deposit to: La Finquita del Buho 7960 NW Dick Road, Hillsboro, OR 97124

You are welcome to find a share partner and alternate weeks or share each week’s bounty. Please do let us know who you are sharing with, so they are included on the email list and sign-in sheet. If you don’t have a partner just let me know and I will match you up with one. I am hopeful that Ana will once again organize a pick-up plan for Portland folks who want to travel out here once a month and not once week or once every other week. Let me know if you are interested and we will start organizing. Suggestions for how to make that system work better are always appreciated.

We hope you all enjoy this last half day of winter break and find a few minutes to get outside and play in the snow! We look forward to growing your vegetables in 2016

 

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Thanksgiving Harvest 2015

  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Radiccho
  • Daikon Radish
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Garlic
  • Winter Squash
  • Pie Pumpkins (don’t throw out the seeds! They are delicious slow roasted with a bit of season salt or paprika)
  • green peppers
  • hot peppers
  • green tomatoes
  • beets or carrots
  • Parsley
  • Kohlrabi (giant, yet tender, use peeled, sliced and eaten raw or sauté or shred in a slaw)
  • walnuts

We have been gathering the harvest little by little all week long. As we watch the weather and try to beat the deep freeze. We managed to get the tomatoes, peppers, parsley and kohlrabi before it went down to 30 degrees. The tomato bushes are all black today, a sign that they got really cold. Most of the peppers left on the plants are wilted and turning black as they were frost bitten. We have left crops that like a cold snap to encourage their sugars to flow: kale, Brussels sprouts and celeriac for harvest today. I just stepped out and it is about 27 degrees, too cold to harvest yet.

This whole week promises to be cold and crisp, nice weather for cooking and planning for a nice Thanksgiving meal. We got the idea of having our family celebration in the barn from some of our customers. I got carried away with the romance of the barn and ordered space heaters, lights and made garland. Then I spent one late afternoon in the barn when it got to 40 degree, my toes went numb and the romance faded. I thought of my father and mother in down coats carrying plates of steaming stuffing and turkey and abandoned the idea. We will all cram inside our house, and make our way through the buffet laid out in our tight kitchen. We will be warm and cozy and we’ll want to linger into the night.

Your farmers are settling in for the winter. We have planted the garlic, tulip bulbs and some of the cover crop. Just as we sit down to catch our breath the seed catalogs will start arriving, tempting me into another season of new varieties, sweeter carrots, more prolific squash and cucumber beetle resistant beans! We want to thank all of our members for sticking it out with us this season. There are always challenges in farming, we fully expect those challenges to increase as our climate changes and the pressure of new diseases , hotter weather and never dying pests continues. We hope to adapt with those changes, we hope you will join us for the challenge.

We are taking deposits for the 2016 season. We always have room for our returning members. We will have room for your friends and family who want to become part of La Finquita CSA. Please do have them contact us sooner rather than later. The best way is to send us a deposit check for $100 to ensure  membership for 2016. We appreciated the feedback many of you provided to us since the end of the regular season. You are welcome to send your comments to us now if you missed out last month. The comments help us contemplate doing things differently; will we dedicate space and water to growing corn? Will we look for a smaller romanesco so we can plant more of it? Will we get the timing right for Brussels Sprouts to produce during the regular season?

The four questions are:

1) What was your favorite part of being a member of La Finquita del Buho?

2) What vegetable would you like to see more of?

3) If you could change one (or more things) about your farm share, what would that be?

4) Will you continue your membership in 2016?

 

Feel free to send us your responses. There is plenty of time for us to think about how next season will look and what we will plant, we have until January to start planting!

 

Please check out the wreath shop! We have wreaths, bird feeders and a whole new selection of ceramics! I am happy to take orders holiday gifts, mugs, matching bowls, bird houses! We will be serving treats and tea and coffee the day after Thanksgiving if you come out to harvest your holiday tree or to wine taste stop in and say “Hi”.

 

We wish you all a thoughtful holiday season as we face the challenges of  a very complex world. Thank you for your support of our effort to grow delicious food and sustain our community. You are making a difference.

Brussels Sprout Leaves with Bacon (or Pancetta)

 

Cut the stems and separate the sprouts into leaves.  Thinly slice the tightly compact centers.  Saute some diced onion and pancetta or bacon in olive oil unitil softened.  Add the sprout leaves, season with salt and moisten with a little white wine and water of chicken stock.  Cover and simmer for 10 to15 minutes, until tender.  Taste for seasoning, grind in black pepper and serve.

Butternut Shrimp Bisque

Frank Brigtsen, Brigtsen’s Resturaunt

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups diced yellow onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 cups butternut squash (peeled, de-seeded, and diced into ½ – inch cubes)
  • 2 cups peeled fresh shrimp
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons salt
  • 3/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • ½ cup shrimp stock (see NOTE)
  • 6 cups heavy whipping cream

NOTE: To make shrimp stock, place shrimp heads and shells into a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain.

  1. Heat the butter in a heavy-duty saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and bay leaf and cook, stirring constantly, until the onions become soft and clear, 3-4 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add the butternut squash. Cook this mixture, stirring occasionally, until the squash begins to soften, 6-8 minutes.
  3. Reduce heat to low and add the shrimp, salt, cayenne, and white pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp turn pink, 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the shrimp stock and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6-8 minutes. If the mixture begins to stick to the pan, scrape it with a spoon and continue cooking. This will intensify the flavor of the bisque.
  5. Remove bay leaf and discard. Transfer the squash/shrimp mixture to a food processor and puree. Return the puree to a saucepan and add the cream. Whisk until thoroughly blended. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces
1 1/4 cups flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons cinnamon
½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cup half and half
4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

Brussels Sprouts With Ginger and Mustard Seeds
from Alice Waters of Chez Panisse

5 tablespoons light olive oil
1 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed until all leaves are torn off
Salt
2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1 teaspoon hot red pepper
1 lime

  1. Heat sauté pan over high heat. Add oil and brussels sprout leaves, and season with salt.
  2. Toss and brown until tender. Add ginger, mustard seeds and hot red pepper. Toss and cook for a minute more. Simmer until completely tender, 1 to 3 minutes.
  3. Add the juice of half a lime. Taste and adjust salt and lime. Serve.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Browned Onions from Chef Jonathan Miller
Everyone loves brussels sprouts with bacon. Here’s a version from Marquita farm:

1 stalk  Brussels sprouts
olive oil
1/4 pound bacon
1 large onion

Heat the oven to 425. Strip the Brussels sprouts off the stalk. Halve the Brussels sprouts lengthwise. Toss with a few tablespoons olive oil and some salt directly on a sheet pan. Peel your onions and slice them in half, then thinly crosswise. Slice the bacon into half inch pieces.

Roast the sprouts in the oven until lightly colored and crispy on their edges, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven.
Heat a large skillet and cook the bacon until crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and pour off all but a couple tablespoons of the fat. Add the sliced onions to the bacon fat in the skillet and sauté briskly until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir regularly to make sure they brown evenly. Remove from heat.

Combine the browned onions with the Brussels sprouts and the crisped bacon. Taste to make sure you like it, adjusting seasonings as necessary.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces

1 1/4 cups flour

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons sugar

3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree

1 cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground ginger

2 teaspoons cinnamon

½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

1 1/3 cup half and half

4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

FRESH PUMPKIN BREAD

(From Reminisce, Nov1991)

 

3 1/2 all purpose flour

2 t baking soda

1 t salt

1 t each ground cinnamon and nutmeg

2 c sugar

1 c vegetable oil

4 eggs, beaten

1 t each vanilla extract

¾ cup buttermilk

1 cup raisins (optional)

1 cup walnuts, chopped

2 cups fresh pumpkin

 

  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl
  2. Add eggs, oil, buttermilk, and sugar, mix well (I beat with a wisk)
  3. Add pumpkin, vanilla, raisins and walnuts
  4. Pour into two greased 9″ x 5″ loaf pans.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 60-65 minutes or until bread tests done.
  6. Let stand 10 minutes before removing from pans. Then cool on a wire rack.
  7. Can be served fresh or frozen

 Kale Salad

 

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  Can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

 

 

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