Week #4

Week #4

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Dill or sage
  • Green garlic
  • Lettuce mix
  • Walnuts
  • Chinese broccoli or Bok Choi or radish or turnip (not sure what to do with those delicious turnips and their greens? See recipe below!

The weeds are starting to get really annoying. It is crunch time with those buggers. Our horrid grass plague is really going wild, popping up everywhere. It is not too hard to pull out right now, but that is by hand. With a hoe it is much harder as it can be deep and clumped. Juve is stretched thin with fencing for the goats and sheep, feeding the wide variety of animals we have and weeding, tilling etc. I am planting every chance I get and trying to keep up with seeding and transplanting and weeding when I get a chance.

I spent the last two days in Corvallis with Diego at OSU Mom’s weekend. It was a blast, mainly just being with Diego hanging out and walking a ton (33,600 steps yesterday and > 15,000 today). We hit up the local farmer’s market, I bought tons of plants, wait don’t I sell plants? It was just a great time to be together. I came home late this afternoon and loaded the van for the plant sale at Catlin Gable School tomorrow morning. Polly and I have been planting every week since February and it is so rewarding to see them (our seedlings) so beautiful and ready to go into people’s gardens. I will be at Catlin Gable from 12- 4 tomorrow. Polly will be selling at Ben and Jerry’s on Hawthorne with the Birthing Way Midwifery School from 11- 4.

We start at the Beaverton Farmers Market next Saturday May 7th from 8 – 1:30. Please do come and see me at either location. We have a huge variety of veggie, flower and herb starts available. We have everything from peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, basil, beans, corn, broccoli and much much more. You can also order directly from us at the farm from the list of starts I sent out earlier last month.

I hope to get the squash and pumpkins seeded this week. I have tons of flowers to get transplanted out into the field as well as the remainder of the onions, the first beans and more cukes. It is a great time of year if only we could work 24 hours a day. I am going to head to bed so I can rise early to get the harvest mostly done prior to heading to Catlin. Enjoy your veggies, peas and carrots are not far off.

Mom’s Rhubarb Coffee Cake

1 cup brown sugar

½ cup soft butter

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups fresh rhubarb cut in 1 inch pieces

2 cups unbleached flour (can use Namaste gluten free flour)

1 teaspoon baking soda (increase by ½ teaspoon if making gluten free)

1 teaspoon cinnamon

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk or soy milk (tofu sour cream with soy milk ½ and ½)

Topping:

½ cup soft butter

½ cup brown sugar

½ cup shredded coconut

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

  1. In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar together. Add the egg and vanilla and mix well.
  2. In another bowl, combine ½ cup flour with the rhubarb and mix to coat the fruit with the flour, set aside.
  3. In a separate medium-sized bowl, combine the remaining flour and other dry ingredients. Mix well.
  4. In a small bowl, mix the topping ingredients with a fork or pastry cutter. Set aside.
  5. Add the dry ingredients, alternating the milk to the egg mixture. Mix just until combined. Fold the rhubarb into the batter and pour into a lightly oiled 9 X 13 inch baking pan. Sprinkle the topping over this and bake for 45 minutes or until a wooden skewer comes out of the center clean. Allow to cool slightly before cutting.

 

Spinach Salad with toasted Seeds

½ # spinach

3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms

1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds

½ toasted sunflower seeds

¼ cup toasted sesame seeds

1 cup thinly sliced red pepper

Dressing:

¾ cup extra virgin olive oil

¼ cup white wine vinegar

1 tablespoon honey

2 teaspoons of crushed garlic

2 teaspoons prepared Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon mayonnaise

Salt and pepper to taste

  1. Mix all the dressing ingredients together in a blender or with a whisk
  2. In a bowl toss the fresh spinach with the mushrooms and bell pepper and toasted seeds. Dress and serve immediately garnish with sliced red pepper.

 

 

MORROCAN TURNIP AND CHICKEN STEW

 

 

2 cups cooked chickpeas

2 small (2 1/2 lb) chickens

3 Tb butter

1 Tb oil

2 onions

5 cups chicken stock

1/2 tsp white pepper

1/4 tsp ground ginger

1/8 tsp powdered saffron

1/2 tsp turmeric

1 lb small turnips

2 cups chopped turnip leaves and stems

1/4 cup lemon juice

salt and freshly ground pepper

 

 

 

Rinse chickpeas in water and rub lightly to remove skins; drain and set aside. Cut chickens into quarters, removing wing tips and backbones; put them aside for stock. Melt butter and oil in a casserole and lightly brown chicken on all sides, cooking in two batches if necessary. Slice onions and stir into butter and oil to color. Then add the chickpeas, stock, pepper, ginger, saffron, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add turnips and greens and simmer 20 minutes more. Remove chicken and turnips to a covered warm dish. Boil sauce to reduce, mashing some of the chickpeas against the side of the pan to thicken the sauce; it may take 10-15 minutes to produce a nice thick sauce. Add lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste. Reheat the chicken and turnips in the sauce and serve.   Serves 6 to 8.  From The Victory Garden Cookbook.

Lemon –Lentil Soup

3 tablespoons olive oil or safflower oil

2 cups diced onions

2 tablespoons crushed garlic

1 ½ cups freshly diced carrots

1 cup diced potatoes

2 bay leaves

1 cup diced celery

1 cup dry red lentils (I would use the small French green lentils)

5 cups water or stock

¼ cup lemon juice

2 tablespoons fresh dill

4 cups packed fresh greens (spinach, kale or chard)

  1. In a soup pot sauté the onions, garlic, carrots, and potatoes with the bay leaves in oil, just until the potatoes begin to soften about 15 minutes
  2. Rinse and check the lentils for stones.
  3. Add the celery and lentils to the soup pot and continue to sauté for about 5 minutes. Add the water or stock and reduce the heat to medium, Cover and simmer until the lentils and the vegetables are tender approximately 15 minutes.
  4. Just before serving, remove from the heat and stir in the lemon juice, chopped dill and greens. Stir until the greens have wilted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

 

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Week #3

Week #3

  • Salad Mix – enjoy this tender salad mix of buttery lettuce. Wash her well as tiny slugs like to hide between the leaves
  • Shallots – use as you would onions, or if you find them building up week to week, peel them and cut them in half and roast them with a drizzle of olive oil and salt and pepper at 350 degrees for 45-60 minutes and they become like caramel!
  • Spinach – the intimidating large leaves cook down to a manageable size. Enjoy spinach simple steamed, sautéed or in soup (check out the recipe below.
  • Baby beets or chard – eat the beet greens as you would chard, steam, sauté or braise, see recipe below
  • Kale – there are so many ways to enjoy this healthy green
  • Chinese broccoli or bok choi
  • Cauliflower – the last until June, so enjoy!

How appropriate that on this week of Passover and the recounting of the 10 plagues we find a new (old but forgotten) plague. The Chinese broccoli is just getting started and we have been noting some dying plants. We were thinking that a nasty gopher was munching it from below until I pulled out a plant and found a tiny cluster of root maggots completely demolishing the base of each dying plant. Ugh! How to treat a plague that is below ground? It is mainly in one bed of broccoli and one greenhouse but a very disturbing finding. Story to be continued.

On the sunny side, our peas are in full bloom in the greenhouse and we have two beds in the field that have enjoyed the reprieve from the hot weather and have taken off with the rain. We should have sugar snaps in the next few weeks. We continue to prep and plant as our spring crops take off our summer crops are getting ready to be planted after the cold nights predicted this week. We will seed winter squash this week and plan to get it in to the nicely made beds by mid May.

The greenhouse tomatoes are starting to green up (get established). We planted hot peppers in the hoop house as well as basil. The sweet peppers should get planted as soon as they are sized up so they can withstand pest pressure. I dared to put in a bed of cucumbers in the greenhouse, this might be foolish, but it might pay off with early cukes. We will have to see, farming is like gambling, sometimes you win and sometimes you loose. My strategy is to keep on planting and try to beat the plagues!

We have some veggies starts we will put out today. If you want specific items please do fill out the form I sent last week and I will gather them for you for pick up in May. I can seed special items for you but I need some lead time. I am off to harvest now, see you around the farm.

Bittman curry creamed spinach w/potato crust. (4-6 svgs)

3 Lbs spinach or other greens, trimmed
2 tbs butter
2 tsp garam masala or curry powder
1/4 tsp nutmeg
2 c coconut milk
1/2 c yogurt
(1 brick extra firm tofu cut into 1/2″ cubes- I didn’t do this)
1 large russet potato, thinly sliced
2 tbs olive oil
Salt, pepper

1. Preheat oven to 425. blanch greens by dropping in salted boiling water x 1 minute, then plunge into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking, drain and squeeze out excess moisture. roughly chop.

2.melt butter and garam masalas and nutmeg in large skillet until fragrant, then add coconut milk, yogurt, spinach, tofu, and tsp salt. Bring to a oil, stirring at times until bulk of the liquid is absorbed. Transfer to oven proof dish.

3. Toss the potato slices with oil, salt, pepper, then lay over the spinach in a single layer. Bake until the potatoes are golden and crisp.

 

White House No-Cream Creamed Spinach

Published May 25, 2010

Makes 6 servings

This side dish is one of Michelle Obama’s favorites because it has a creamy texture without a lot of calories and fat. One person who’s not a fan, however, is Sasha Obama, who is turned off by the bright green color — a shade of the vegetable rainbow she has yet to embrace.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds baby spinach
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 shallots, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

Wash and clean the spinach. Place a large bowl of water near the sink, and put several handfuls of ice cubes in it. Place a colander in the sink.

Fill a medium-sized pot with water, and sprinkle in some salt. Place the pot on the stove and bring to a boil over high heat. Carefully add 8 ounces of the spinach (about a quarter of the leaves) and let it boil for just 30 seconds.

Carefully pour the spinach and water into the colander to drain the spinach. Then, using tongs or a fork to handle the hot spinach, immediately “shock” the spinach by putting it into the ice water to stop the cooking process. Let the spinach sit in the cold water for a minute, then drain it again in the colander. Squeeze the spinach with your hands or press the spinach against the colander with the back of a spoon to remove excess water.

Place the cooked spinach in a blender and purée. Set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add shallots and garlic and cook until the shallots turn translucent, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the rest of the spinach leaves, tossing with a spoon and sautéing until the leaves are wilted. Add the puréed spinach and stir. Season with salt and pepper.

Adapted from White House Executive Chef Cristeta Comerford

 

 

 

Spinach and Lentils

The Asian Cook Book

 

Serves 4

Generous 1 cup yellow split lentils, rinsed                                 ¼ tsp ground asafetida (?)

5 cups water                                                                                        ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon ground coriander                                                          1 tsp ground cumin

9 oz. fresh spinach leaves, thick stems removed, sliced and  rinsed

4 scallions

To garnish:

3 tbsp vegetable oil or peanut oil

1tsp mustard seeds

2 fresh chilies, split length wise

½ inch piece fresh gingerroot, very finely chopped

 

Put the lentils and water in a large pan over high heat.  Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to the lowest setting, and skim the surface as necessary.

 

When the foam stops rising, stir in the ground coriander, cumin, asafetida, and turmeric.  Half-cover the pan and let the lentils simmer for 40 minutes or until they are very tender and only a thin layer of liquid is left on top.

Stir the spinach and scallions into the lentils and continue simmering for another 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until the spinach is wilted.  If the water evaporates before the spinach is cooked, stir in al little extra.  Add salt to taste.  Transfer the lentils to a serving dish.

To make the garnish, heat the oil in a small pan over high heat.  Add the mustard seeds, chilies gingerroot and stir until the mustard seeds begin to pop and the chilies sizzle.  Pour the oil and spices over the lentils and serve.

 

Cook’s tip:  The exact amount of water needed depends primarily on how old the lentils are, but also on the size of the pan.  The older the lentils are, the longer simmering they will require to become tender.  Unfortunately, there isn’t any way to determine the age when you buy lentils, so be prepared to add extra water and increase the cooking time.  Also, remember, the wider the pan the quicker the water will evaporate.

Kale Omelete

By the Armard Family

 

INGREDIENTS

 

– as much kale as you could get with two hands together (as a buch) after it has been chopped (aprox. 2 cups)

– Olive oil (2-3 tablespoons)

– One small well-chopped clove of garlic

– 1 teaspoon of salt

– 1/4 cup of feta or chevre cheese (small pieces)

– 1 small-medium riped tomato or 4-5 cherry tomatoes (chopped)

– Fresh black pepper

– 3 eggs

– Finely chopped basil or parsley

 

PROCEDURES

 

– Stir the eggs very well with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and black pepper in a bowl. Set aside

– Heat the olive oil at medium-high and when hot add the kale and the chopped garlic. Cook until kale is soft stirring constantly. Don’t overcook. Then take out

– Reduce the fire to low-medium (let the pan cool down a little first), re-stir the eggs and poor them on the pan (use more olive oil if needed before adding the eggs)

– Immediately add the cooked kale/garlic, the chopped tomatoes, the cheese and the remaining salt

– Cover for about a minute with a lid

– Fold or whatever you prefer or can do (fritatta Vs. Omelette)

– Take out and add some chopped parsley or basil on top

STIR-FRIED CHINESE BROCCOLI
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, smashed
2 lb Chinese broccoli (sometimes known as Chinese kale), ends of stems trimmed and broccoli cut into 1-inch pieces
1/2 cup Thai chicken stock or canned chicken broth
2 tablespoons Thai yellow bean sauce
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
2 teaspoons sugar

Special equipment: a large (6-qt) wok
Heat oil in wok over high heat until hot but not smoking, then stir-fry garlic until pale golden, 10 to 15 seconds. Add broccoli and stock and stir-fry 2 minutes. Add bean sauce, oyster sauce, and sugar and stir-fry until broccoli is crisp-tender, 4 to 5 minutes.

Cooks’ note:
Broccoli can be trimmed and cut 6 hours ahead and chilled in a sealed plastic bag.

Gourmet
May 2004

Roasted Beets and Braised Beet tops with Canellini Beans(serves 4)

 

2 bunches medium beets with tops

1 medium red onion, cut into thin (1/4 – inch) wedges

water

3 T extra virgin olive oil

2 T red wine vinegar

1 t dried oregano or 2 t fresh oregano leaves, minced

½ t Kosher salt

½ t minced garlic

Freshly ground pepper

1  15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinced

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cut grenn tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch of stem attached.  Set greens aside to be used fro Braising Beet tops.

 

Wash beets and dry.  Wrap each bet tightly in a square of foil and rasp until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 1 hour or more, depending on size.  Cool, unwrap foil and rub off outside skin.  Trim and discard stems and ends, and cut beets into ½ inch wedges.  Set aside separately until ready to serve.  Strain any juices left in foil into a small bowl and reserve.

Place onion wedges in a small bowl and cover with cold water.  Add a handful of ice cubes and let stand until ready to use. To make Braised Beet Tops, wash beet tops in several changes of water, trim stems and coarsely chop leaves into 2 inch pieces.  There should be about 8 cups, or 1 pound, lightly packed.  Heat 2 cups water to boiling in a large, broad saucepan.  Stir in beet greens and cook until wilted and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.  Drain well, cool and then press lightly on greens with back of spoon to remove excess moisture.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, reserved beet juices, oregano, garlic, and salt and pepper to taste until well blended.  Measure out 1 Tablespoon and add it to the beet wedges.  Toss to combine.

Remove ice cubes and drain water from onion.  Add onion to dressing along with cooked beet greens and beans.  Toss gently to blend.  Spoon into a serving bowl and arrange beet wedges around edges and on top.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

Roasted Beets and Braised Beet tops with Canellini Beans(serves 4)

 

2 bunches medium beets with tops

1 medium red onion, cut into thin (1/4 – inch) wedges

water

3 T extra virgin olive oil

2 T red wine vinegar

1 t dried oregano or 2 t fresh oregano leaves, minced

½ t Kosher salt

½ t minced garlic

Freshly ground pepper

1  15 ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinced

 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cut grenn tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch of stem attached.  Set greens aside to be used fro Braising Beet tops.

 

Wash beets and dry.  Wrap each bet tightly in a square of foil and raso until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 1 hour or more, depending on size.  Cool, unwrat foil and rub off outside skin.  Trim and discard stems and ends, and cut beets into ½ inch wedges.  Set aside separately until ready to serve.  Strain any juices left in foil into a small bowl and reserve.

Place onion wedges in a small bowl and cover with cold water.  Add a handful of ice cubes and let stand until ready to use.To make Braised Beet Tops, wash beet tops in serveral changes of water, trim stems and coarsely chop leaves into 2 inch pieces.  Ther should be about 8 cups, or 1 pound, lightly packed.  Heat 2 cups water to boilingin a large, broad saucepan.  Stir in beet greens and cook until wilted and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.  Drain well, cool and then press lightly on greens with back of spoon to remove excess moisture.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, reserved beet juices, oregano, garlic, and salt and pepper to taste until well blended.  Measure out 1 Tablespoon and add it to the beet wedges.  Toss to combine.

Remove ice cubes and drain water from onion.  Add onion to dresing along with cooked beet greens and beans.  Toss gently to blend.  Spoon into a serving bowl and arrange beet wedges around edges and on top.  Serve warm or at room tempurature.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #2

Week #2 2016

Salad Mix – Salanova lettuce from Johnnys’ saves the day. The little lettuces that held on during the flood that ran through the greenhouse in March, have made nice heads with many leaves. Enjoy the mix! Good bye bitter endive!

Bok choi – another early season powerhouse! Sweet and young, eat it now before the on slot of flea beetles turn the leaves to lace.

Cauliflower or Chinese Broccoli – the cauliflower is almost finished and the Chinese Broccoli is just starting. The Chinese Broccoli is special because the stems and leaves are part of the deliciousness. Sautee the whole thing with garlic and a dash of soy sauce and eat over rice.

Kale – amazing stuff, just pumping out the leaves, thank you super food. Enjoy it weekly (we eat it daily!) some of our favorite recipes are listed below, many more on the website.

Spinach – Osbourne seed company has a winner with this very dark green spinach. The vitamins are surging through the leaves and will contribute to your health. Try Polly’s recipe below for Saag, with or without the lamb.

Shallots – held over from last season, strong and flavorful, use as you would an onion.

Walnuts – our grand old tree did well last season. Thanks to all the hands that went into gathering them. Most are in great condition, some are not, hard to tell until you crack them, so enjoy.

We have been busy this week. Juve tilled the main fields just before the rain and the soil was perfect. We planted more sugar snaps along with shallots, green onions, broccoli, cabbage, kohlrabi, and parsley. We managed to get in our early tomatoes in the greenhouse, four beds this year. With the nice rain last week the weeds will be close on our heels.

There was quite the demand for pork, all our piglets are spoken for. We still have beef and possible a lamb. Contact Juve to reserve your meat. The beef may be butchered in the early summer or fall, the pork by the end of summer.

We will have vegetable starts. I sent a list with the weekly email. You can either send me and email, leave me a note or text me. I will have starts available beginning to mid May. I have some kale, shallots and sugar snaps right now, available in the barn. Come see me at Catlin Gable School on May 1, I will be selling all the starts we grow. The Beaverton Farmers Market opens on May 7 and runs through October. Come see me on Saturdays 8 – 1:30, I sell with Pumpkin Ridge Gardens.

Off to harvest

 

 

Kale Salad (from Kris Schamp)

(A brief note: I use just kale, and red onion most of the time and it is delicious, this dressing recipe works well on most spicy greens like arugula and mustard as well)

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

 

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

 

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

 

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

 

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

 

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  You can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

Chinese Broccoli

(Lyn’s Quick Stir Fry)

1 bunch Chinese Broccoli (flower, stem and leaves) – remove any hard end of the stem

2-4 cloves of garlic minced

1 – 2 tablespoon soy sauce

¼ cup water

Olive oil

Heat a wok or frying pan and add 1-2 tablespoons olive oil. Add minced garlic until aromatic (about 1 minute) then add the broccoli and toss to coat with oil and garlic for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce and coat then add the water and cover for 3-5 minutes until tender and still bright green. Serve by itself or over rice. . . YUM!

 

 

Baked Crispy Kale Recipe

 

Servings:  4 as snack Prep Time: 5 Cook Time: 20

The biggest secret to getting the kale super-crisp is to dry them in a salad spinner. If there is moisture on the leaves, the kale will steam, not crisp. Also, do not salt the kale until after they have come out of the oven. If you salt beforehand, the salt will just cause the kale to release moisture…thus steaming instead of crisping. I’ve also found that the convection setting on my oven works really well too – I set the convection on 325F and bake for about 10-15 minutes. Have fun with this recipe, I sometimes mix the salt with Cajun or Creole seasoning.

Ingredients:

4 giant handfuls of kale, torn into bite-sized pieces and tough stems removed (about 1/3 pound)

1-2 tablespoons olive oil

sea salt or kosher salt

(I like to grate parmesan or romano cheese over them before baking)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

 

  1. Place the kale leaves into a salad spinner and spin all of the water out of the kale. Dump the water and repeat one or two times more just to make sure that the kale is extra dizzy and dry. Use a towel to blot any extra water on the leaves. Place the kale on the baking sheet.

 

  1. Drizzle olive oil over the kale leaves and use your hands to toss and coat the leaves. Bake in the oven for 12-20 minutes until leaves are crisp. Take a peek at the 12 minute mark – the timing all depends on how much olive oil you use. Just use a spatula or tongs to touch the leaves, if they are paper-thin crackly, the kale is done. If the leaves are still a bit soft, leave them in for another 2 minutes. Do not let the leaves turn brown (they’ll be burnt and bitter) Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and serve.

LAMB SAAG

  • 4 lamb shanks
  • 2-3 Lbs. spinach
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 Tbs. ghee (or butter and oil mixed)
  • 1 tsp. brown mustard seed
  • 1/8 tsp. asafetida
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne
  • ½ tsp. ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp. grated nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • 1 tsp. ground cumin
  • 3 Tbs. water
  • 3 Tbs. cream (or use sour cream or yogurt)
  • 2 tsp. salt

Cover lamb shanks with water in a large pot.  Add 1 tsp. salt and bring to a boil.  Simmer until the lamb is starting to loosen from the bone.  If you have time, put boiled lamb shanks onto the grill to brown.  Chop lamb and set aside.

Meanwhile, wash spinach and strip leaves off of stems.  Chop coarsely.  Combine cayenne, coriander, black pepper, nutmeg, turmeric and cumin in a small bowl, add water, and stir well.  Melt the butter and oil (or ghee) in a 5-quart pan over moderate heat.  Add mustard seed and cook until it starts to pop.  Add asafetida and let it sizzle, then add spice mixture and onion.  Fry for about 2 minutes.

Add spinach to pan, sprinkle with 1 tsp. salt.  Cover and reduce heat.  Stir occasionally until spinach is all bright green and very wilted.  Add water if necessary.  At this point, the saag can be removed from heat and can sit if necessary.  Before serving, put spinach in a food processor and puree.  Return it to the pan, add chopped lamb, stir in cream and reheat briefly.

Adapted from The Best of Lord Krishna’s Cuisine by Yamuna Devi.

by Tori Ritchie

 

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2016 Season Opens!!

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Week #1, 2016

  • Salad mix – these are the bitter greens of They require a nice dressing and some good cheese, either blue, gorgonzola, parmesan, or manchego to cut the bitter. (some recipes are listed below).  If it is too bitter for you super tasters don’t dismay, you will be forgiven for not eating it and adding it to your compost.
  • Shallots – nice and spicy held over from last years harvest, great in soups
  • Swiss Chard – a nice mild green to use in stir fry or in your morning smoothie.
  • Spinach – take not of the intense color, full of vitamins and cooks down to a reasonable amount!
  • Leeks – nice to use the white parts and some of the pale green in soups
  • Cauliflower – this is the last of the overwintering wonder. We planted these in August of last year and the plants held in the field all winter. In February they started to grow and headed up over the last few weeks. Enjoy them roasted (our favorite) with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Sprouting broccoli – a seasonal favorite that peaked in March. We have a bit left for you, but we can’t control mother nature so more than 200 feet of broccoli went to waste L
  • Radishes or arugula – you choose one to add to your salad this week.

The day has finally come! We are so excited to open our 17th season of growing vegetables. The time has flown by and we have learned so many things and there remain so many mysteries! We had a mild but wet winter with this beautiful dry warm spell that has put us ahead of schedule. From my notes over the years there are warnings not to plant in early April! “Don’t be fooled it can and likely will still freeze until after May 15th”, my scribbles say. But, we jumped ahead and have our entire upper field planted with frost tolerant plants, the rain this week is welcome and hopefully it won’t get too cold.

The greenhouses are full of growing plants despite the rivers that ran through many of them in March. The lettuce is almost ready for salad mix, the Chinese broccoli is starting to form it’s first stalks and the kale is oh so close. This week you will eat mainly what has survived the winter. Next week you will eat the late winter planting of spring crops. This time of year is full of flavors, many bitter and then sweet. They are all good for us, some need a little doctoring to make them more palatable.

We have many baby animals at this time of year. The lambs and kids are jumping all around and their mamas are making nice rich milk. Juvencio tries to find time to fence for them to graze out in the field, but his time is like gold (el tiempo es oro) not enough in the day to get it all done. Soon they will spend their days out in the field and be brought in at night so the coyotes don’t get them. We have 8 weaner pigs as well, black and spunky.

With all the new life we also have loss. Yesterday we said good-bye to our loyal Pepito. He has been a great dog, so loveable and good hearted always there to greet people. He died of old age accelerated by a life of jumping and hard work on the farm (although the last few years he was not working that hard it took a toll on his body). We also said good bye to our old mare Victoria. She passed earlier this week. Her son, Venture, the Morgan gelding is struggling without her and is kind of at a loss. She was very old but survived here on the farm for over three years. Life marches on.

Zuko, our newest dog has grown some, but to our dismay he seems to be a “mini” cattle dog. He is still young and needs to be taught not to jump and heard people. Please do encourage him not to jump and lick little ones in the face. He loves to be pet and is anxious for attention. Fiora, our border collie mix is our best working dog, she herds the sheep and goats and tries to catch the gophers. She is very friendly when not distracted by her “work”. Oliver, now the eldest of our dogs at 6 is a tough Napoleon complexed rat terrier. He has gotten more friendly, but on his own terms, so pet him when he comes to you, and let him be when he is standoffish.

 

Our season opening potluck starts today at 2:00 and runs until 6:00. Please drop in and enjoy the food, music and a tour of the farm. Part of what makes La Finquita different is the community we strive to create among our subscribers. You will have the opportunity to meet like minded (or at least like eaters) people who are committed to eating seasonal, local food grown with care and consideration for the environment and the people who will be consuming those vegetables. The pizza oven will be fired up and you can build your own pizza. BYOB, and pizza topping. See the attached flyer for full details.

 

We still have space for more subscribers and we know from experience that the best subscribers come from current subscribers, so tell your friends! This is a unique opportunity to see where your veggies are grown. We have a veggie pool that helps people who live in Portland get there veggie dropped in their neighborhood and reduces the number of visits one has to make to the farm. Spread the word and have people contact us via email: lynjuve@msn.com or call or text my cell phone: 503-568-5760.

 

We look forward to getting to know each of you over the course of the season. Please do let us know if there is something you want us to grow or if something is not to your liking so that we can try and meet your needs. We want happy subscribers and we want you to eat your veggies every day!

 

 

 

Spinach Soup

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is still delicious!)

  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 small carrot
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • ½ cup parsley leaves
  • 2 bunches young spinach
  • 2 sprigs fresh tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraiche
  • Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin. Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

Serves 6

Garbanzos y Acelgas

Chickpeas and chard (or spinach)

9 ounces of dried chickpeas

1 carrot, diced

1 sprig flat leaf parsley

1 bay leaf

2 yellow onions 1/3 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

9 ounces or 1 bunch chard, beet greens or spinach (more is even better)

2 eggs (hard boiled or fried and placed on top of each portion)

Put the chickpeas in a bowl, cover with cold water and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and put in a large saucepan with the carrot, parsley, bay leaf and half the chopped onion. Cover with water then bring to a boil and cook about 20 minutes or until almost tender. Add 2 teaspoons salt and half the oil and cook for another 10 minutes. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and cook the garlic and remaining onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomato and cook for 5 minutes. Stir the tomato mixture into the chickpea mixture (it should be wet enough to be saucy but not too soupy). Stir in the chard, beet greens or spinach. Cook for 5 minutes or until the greens are tender. Season well and serve with either the hard boiled egg or fried egg on top.

Serves 4

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

 

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

Radish Top Soup

 

Don’t through out your radish greens.  Believe it or not, those fuzzy leaves can be transformed into a smooth green soup, with a hint of watercress flavor.

 

6 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onions or white part of leek

8 cups loosely packed radish leaves

2 cups diced potatoes

6 cups liquid (water, chicken stock or combo)

salt

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

freshly ground pepper

 

Melt 4 T butter in a large saucepan, add onions or leeks and cook until golden, approximately 5 minutes.  Stir in radish tops cover pan and cook over low heat until wilted, 8-10 minutes.  Meanwhile cook potatoes until soft in liquid along with 1 teaspoon of salt.  Combine with the radish tops and cook covered, for 5 minutes to mingle flavors.  Puree finely in a food processor of food mill.  Ad the cream if desired and enrich with 2 T of butter.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve hot. (serves 4-6)

Favorite Escarole Salad as Martin prepares it:

4 heads escarole, dark outer leaves removed, washed and torn into large bowl. Dress with: olive oil, sherry or champagne vinegar, shaved parmesan, S & P, and truffle oil. this is very very delicious.

Wilted Escarole

3 T olive oil
2 medium escarole – rinsed, dried and chopped
1/2 cup lemon juice
chopped zest from one lemon
2 tablespoons capers, roughly/barely chopped
10 dark, pitted olives, kalamata are good here
ground black pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large frying pan over high heat. Add escarole; cook and stir until greens begin to wilt. Stir in lemon juice & zest. Add capers, S & P, and olives; cook and stir for another 15-30 seconds.

Blanched Escarole with Fried Capers

from 366 Healthful Ways to Cook Leafy Greens by Linda Romanelli Leahy

1 bunch escarole (about 1 pound), trimmed and shredded
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted capers, drained
1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper
2 teaspoons thinly sliced lemon zest for garnish, optional

  1. Drop the escarole in a pot of salted boiling water. Cook 3 to 5 minutes until it is as tender as you like. Drain well.
    2. While the escarole is cooking, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the capers and cook 2 minutes; remove with a slotted spoon.
    3. Stir in the drained escarole, salt and pepper and heat through. Place on a serving plate and top with the capers and lemon zest, if using. Serve immediately. Serves 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March update! One month to the start of 2016 season

The beginning of the 2016 season is just around the corner. We have our opening pot luck set for April 10th 2- 6 p.m.. The first harvest begins that week April 11 or 15 depending on your pick up day. We have been hard at work planting the greenhouses to ready ourselves for the season. Unfortunately after last night’s rain we lost half of one of the fully planted greenhouses to flood. The torrential rains of the last 5 days culminated in over 2.5 inches into already saturated land. The rain from the fields to the east of our farm drain to the west of us and the gopher holes served as conduits for that water. Lettuce, kale and peas took the brunt of the flooding. We will try and replant but much of the work we started on 1/18/16 has been washed into the culvert.

Several new plagues have appeared in Oregon in the last year and are spreading over the Willamette Valley. There is the threat of black leg fungus and white spot fungus, affecting the kale, broccoli, and radish families. We have had to find ways to treat these seed born illnesses in hot water treatment baths prior to planting the seeds. There is a new caterpillar which grows fast and is ravenous. It eats just about everything including grass but loves everything on the farm. We lost much of our soft fruit (cherries were particularly hard hit this past year) due to the new fruit fly. The problem with farming is that there is always some new threat out there making the already difficult task of farming harder.

Juve brought home 8 new weaner piglets yesterday. We have 11 lambs and about 14 kids (we have lost track). Juve is determined to diminish our cattle herd by half (he has had to travel to McMinnville  three times a week all winter!) so there will be plenty of grass fed beef for sale. He is anxious to get your deposit for 1/2 – whole a hog, a whole lamb and  1/4 – 1/2 a steer. The deposit for each is $100. They will go to the butcher this summer or early fall.

As soon as I can figure out how to load my pictures to my ridiculous new office 365 (I hate microsoft!) I will get photos posted of the lambs, goats and the river running through the greenhouse. Please contact us ASAP if you are interested in 2016 season, we still have space and want to welcome you to our community.

 

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Happy New Year!!

Happy New Years from your farmers at La Finquita del Buho. It is currently snowing and even seems to be sticking! The weather service says 1-3 inches. That amount is fine, but more than 4 inches can threaten our hoop houses. With both our boys back at college, we have less hands on deck to deal with a weather emergency. It looks like by 7 pm it will start to melt.

We are still getting seed orders filled out and strategizing about the 2016 season. By the end of the month it is time to seed onions, peas, and all sorts of other winter harder greens. This is really my last weekend to “play” as I set out the schedule for the remaining weeks of winter. We did manage to leave our farm for 6 days on a trip to sunny southern California. We played at the San Diego Zoo and Wild Animal Park. We dove into the 60 degree Del Mar Ocean and enjoyed walks in the many botanical gardens at Balboa Park. We missed our veggies and grass fed beef and the amazing foodie scene here in Portland. We did have all sorts of tacos and margueritas without finding a truly super location. The best thing was to spend time as a family and time with our good friends Walter, Susan and Elias.

I just updated the website with dates for start and finish of the season. I adjusted prices to account for the ever escalating price of seeds, soil amendments and organic pest protection. We look forward to improving what we offer and trying new varieties of old favorites. We appreciated the input from subscribers about what went well and what we could change. Some of the suggestions will guide us as we map out this coming season. In order for us to plan for the future we need to know if you are in or out for 2016. We require a deposit of $100 to reserve your spot. You can choose to pay in full or pay as you go. We have broken it down as usual:

  • $100 deposit due on sign –up
  • $390 due by May 1
  • $390 due by August 1
  • $880 for the season, $860 if you pay in full by April 15th.
  • Send enrollment form and your deposit to: La Finquita del Buho 7960 NW Dick Road, Hillsboro, OR 97124

You are welcome to find a share partner and alternate weeks or share each week’s bounty. Please do let us know who you are sharing with, so they are included on the email list and sign-in sheet. If you don’t have a partner just let me know and I will match you up with one. I am hopeful that Ana will once again organize a pick-up plan for Portland folks who want to travel out here once a month and not once week or once every other week. Let me know if you are interested and we will start organizing. Suggestions for how to make that system work better are always appreciated.

We hope you all enjoy this last half day of winter break and find a few minutes to get outside and play in the snow! We look forward to growing your vegetables in 2016

 

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Thanksgiving Harvest 2015

  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Radiccho
  • Daikon Radish
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Garlic
  • Winter Squash
  • Pie Pumpkins (don’t throw out the seeds! They are delicious slow roasted with a bit of season salt or paprika)
  • green peppers
  • hot peppers
  • green tomatoes
  • beets or carrots
  • Parsley
  • Kohlrabi (giant, yet tender, use peeled, sliced and eaten raw or sauté or shred in a slaw)
  • walnuts

We have been gathering the harvest little by little all week long. As we watch the weather and try to beat the deep freeze. We managed to get the tomatoes, peppers, parsley and kohlrabi before it went down to 30 degrees. The tomato bushes are all black today, a sign that they got really cold. Most of the peppers left on the plants are wilted and turning black as they were frost bitten. We have left crops that like a cold snap to encourage their sugars to flow: kale, Brussels sprouts and celeriac for harvest today. I just stepped out and it is about 27 degrees, too cold to harvest yet.

This whole week promises to be cold and crisp, nice weather for cooking and planning for a nice Thanksgiving meal. We got the idea of having our family celebration in the barn from some of our customers. I got carried away with the romance of the barn and ordered space heaters, lights and made garland. Then I spent one late afternoon in the barn when it got to 40 degree, my toes went numb and the romance faded. I thought of my father and mother in down coats carrying plates of steaming stuffing and turkey and abandoned the idea. We will all cram inside our house, and make our way through the buffet laid out in our tight kitchen. We will be warm and cozy and we’ll want to linger into the night.

Your farmers are settling in for the winter. We have planted the garlic, tulip bulbs and some of the cover crop. Just as we sit down to catch our breath the seed catalogs will start arriving, tempting me into another season of new varieties, sweeter carrots, more prolific squash and cucumber beetle resistant beans! We want to thank all of our members for sticking it out with us this season. There are always challenges in farming, we fully expect those challenges to increase as our climate changes and the pressure of new diseases , hotter weather and never dying pests continues. We hope to adapt with those changes, we hope you will join us for the challenge.

We are taking deposits for the 2016 season. We always have room for our returning members. We will have room for your friends and family who want to become part of La Finquita CSA. Please do have them contact us sooner rather than later. The best way is to send us a deposit check for $100 to ensure  membership for 2016. We appreciated the feedback many of you provided to us since the end of the regular season. You are welcome to send your comments to us now if you missed out last month. The comments help us contemplate doing things differently; will we dedicate space and water to growing corn? Will we look for a smaller romanesco so we can plant more of it? Will we get the timing right for Brussels Sprouts to produce during the regular season?

The four questions are:

1) What was your favorite part of being a member of La Finquita del Buho?

2) What vegetable would you like to see more of?

3) If you could change one (or more things) about your farm share, what would that be?

4) Will you continue your membership in 2016?

 

Feel free to send us your responses. There is plenty of time for us to think about how next season will look and what we will plant, we have until January to start planting!

 

Please check out the wreath shop! We have wreaths, bird feeders and a whole new selection of ceramics! I am happy to take orders holiday gifts, mugs, matching bowls, bird houses! We will be serving treats and tea and coffee the day after Thanksgiving if you come out to harvest your holiday tree or to wine taste stop in and say “Hi”.

 

We wish you all a thoughtful holiday season as we face the challenges of  a very complex world. Thank you for your support of our effort to grow delicious food and sustain our community. You are making a difference.

Brussels Sprout Leaves with Bacon (or Pancetta)

 

Cut the stems and separate the sprouts into leaves.  Thinly slice the tightly compact centers.  Saute some diced onion and pancetta or bacon in olive oil unitil softened.  Add the sprout leaves, season with salt and moisten with a little white wine and water of chicken stock.  Cover and simmer for 10 to15 minutes, until tender.  Taste for seasoning, grind in black pepper and serve.

Butternut Shrimp Bisque

Frank Brigtsen, Brigtsen’s Resturaunt

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups diced yellow onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 cups butternut squash (peeled, de-seeded, and diced into ½ – inch cubes)
  • 2 cups peeled fresh shrimp
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons salt
  • 3/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • ½ cup shrimp stock (see NOTE)
  • 6 cups heavy whipping cream

NOTE: To make shrimp stock, place shrimp heads and shells into a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain.

  1. Heat the butter in a heavy-duty saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and bay leaf and cook, stirring constantly, until the onions become soft and clear, 3-4 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add the butternut squash. Cook this mixture, stirring occasionally, until the squash begins to soften, 6-8 minutes.
  3. Reduce heat to low and add the shrimp, salt, cayenne, and white pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp turn pink, 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the shrimp stock and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6-8 minutes. If the mixture begins to stick to the pan, scrape it with a spoon and continue cooking. This will intensify the flavor of the bisque.
  5. Remove bay leaf and discard. Transfer the squash/shrimp mixture to a food processor and puree. Return the puree to a saucepan and add the cream. Whisk until thoroughly blended. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces
1 1/4 cups flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons cinnamon
½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cup half and half
4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

Brussels Sprouts With Ginger and Mustard Seeds
from Alice Waters of Chez Panisse

5 tablespoons light olive oil
1 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed until all leaves are torn off
Salt
2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1 teaspoon hot red pepper
1 lime

  1. Heat sauté pan over high heat. Add oil and brussels sprout leaves, and season with salt.
  2. Toss and brown until tender. Add ginger, mustard seeds and hot red pepper. Toss and cook for a minute more. Simmer until completely tender, 1 to 3 minutes.
  3. Add the juice of half a lime. Taste and adjust salt and lime. Serve.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Browned Onions from Chef Jonathan Miller
Everyone loves brussels sprouts with bacon. Here’s a version from Marquita farm:

1 stalk  Brussels sprouts
olive oil
1/4 pound bacon
1 large onion

Heat the oven to 425. Strip the Brussels sprouts off the stalk. Halve the Brussels sprouts lengthwise. Toss with a few tablespoons olive oil and some salt directly on a sheet pan. Peel your onions and slice them in half, then thinly crosswise. Slice the bacon into half inch pieces.

Roast the sprouts in the oven until lightly colored and crispy on their edges, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven.
Heat a large skillet and cook the bacon until crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and pour off all but a couple tablespoons of the fat. Add the sliced onions to the bacon fat in the skillet and sauté briskly until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir regularly to make sure they brown evenly. Remove from heat.

Combine the browned onions with the Brussels sprouts and the crisped bacon. Taste to make sure you like it, adjusting seasonings as necessary.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces

1 1/4 cups flour

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons sugar

3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree

1 cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground ginger

2 teaspoons cinnamon

½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

1 1/3 cup half and half

4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

FRESH PUMPKIN BREAD

(From Reminisce, Nov1991)

 

3 1/2 all purpose flour

2 t baking soda

1 t salt

1 t each ground cinnamon and nutmeg

2 c sugar

1 c vegetable oil

4 eggs, beaten

1 t each vanilla extract

¾ cup buttermilk

1 cup raisins (optional)

1 cup walnuts, chopped

2 cups fresh pumpkin

 

  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl
  2. Add eggs, oil, buttermilk, and sugar, mix well (I beat with a wisk)
  3. Add pumpkin, vanilla, raisins and walnuts
  4. Pour into two greased 9″ x 5″ loaf pans.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 60-65 minutes or until bread tests done.
  6. Let stand 10 minutes before removing from pans. Then cool on a wire rack.
  7. Can be served fresh or frozen

 Kale Salad

 

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  Can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

 

 

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Last Harvest 2015

 

Week #29

  • Napa Cabbage or green cabbage
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Stuffing peppers
  • Kale or chard
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes (slightly green, they will ripen and they make great green tomatoes or green tomato pie)
  • Green onions or leeks
  • Onions
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower (look at these beauties! They are super roasted or in soup)
  • Garlic
  • Winter squash
  • Brussels sprouts (still tiny, but a teaser for the Thanksgiving Harvest)
  • Dill or parsley
  • Small edible pumpkin or decorative gourds

We are finally here, the end of the 2015 season. The harvest festival last week turned out to be a smash hit. The morning was rainy and dreary. The texts started to come about 9:00 am, “is the harvest festival still on?” and of course my reply, “the show must go on, rain or shine”.  As the afternoon progressed the clouds parted and we actually had sun for the afternoon kick off of the 2015 festival. The alp horns played there mournful tones. The Sheridan High School Taiko drummers mesmerized the crowd. “Mexico en la piel” danced for us with new and different costumes. The afternoon culminated with the sweet sound of the blue grass Finquita singers.

One of the very best things for us was to have our whole family here with us. Diego came home for the first time after setting off to study at OSU and that meant so much to us to have him come back for our farm celebration. Jacob also came home for the whole weekend to help out.  Luna helped with harvest and set up for the event.It was great to be together to put on this culminating event.

Mary Kay and Mark worked the pizza making station and allowed Juve and I to circulate and enjoy the festival. There were many more helpers that I want to mention, but do not in fear of leaving someone out. Needless to say we appreciate you all and know that this would not be possible without the many hands that make this farm provide for our community. The walnut pick-up competition yielded about 100# of walnuts about 1/6th of the nuts that are on the ground. The cider press was used to make quarts of cider from apples from orchard. I think everyone had a good time at the celebration of the farm and the bounty of the land.

We enjoyed having Kate and Jessica, producer and cinematographer of the PBS documentary on the changing face of medicine. They first interviewed me in April in my day job as a family physician at Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center. I invited them to see my other job (La Finquita) and film life on the farm and our celebration of the fall harvest. I think they got a real picture of the community we have created and they had fun as well. The documentary will be aired this spring on OPB , we’ll keep you posted.

The pumpkin patch is still open, plenty of carvers remain for the choosing. We have room for those who want to sign up for the Thanksgiving Harvest. We will have a wide selection of fall veggies for you that will likely keep for weeks, so even if you plan to travel for the holiday it will store well for your return.

Please take the time to answer our four questions:

1) What was your favorite part of being a member of La Finquita del Buho?

2) What vegetable would you like to see more of?

3) If you could change one (or more things) about your farm share, what would that be?

4) Will you continue your membership in 2016?

 

It is time to let us know about 2016. We will have space for you returning members and for new members!  Send us an email (lynjuve@msn.com) or send us your deposit of $100 (non-refundable) to :

La Finquita del Buho

7960 NW Dick Road

Hillsboro, OR 97124

We look forward to seeing you later in the fall and next spring! Stay in touch, we will hibernate a bit but before long we will be ordering seeds and starting them in our hoop house. Thank you for a great season.

CAULIFLOWER GRATIN WITH GRUYERE AND HAZELNUTS
1 medium cauliflower
Salt and freshly ground pepper
½ cup crème fraiche (see note)
¾ c. shredded gruyere cheese
3 Tbsp. bread crumbs
3 Tbsp. hazelnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp. flat parsley for garnish

Butter a 2-quart baking dish or gratin pan. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cut cauliflower into small florets. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt generously. Add cauliflower florets to pot and cook until tender, but not mushy, about 5 minutes. Drain florets and pat dry with a kitchen towel. Toss cauliflower with crème fraiche and half the cheese in the prepared baking dish. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle remaining cheese over cauliflower, then top with bread crumbs and hazelnuts. Bake on center rack until cheese has melted and bread crumbs and nuts are golden, 20-25 minutes or more. Garnish with parsley. Serves 5 or 6. Note: you can make crème fraiche by whisking 1 cup whipping cream with 1/3 c. sour cream in a nonreactive bowl. Let stand at room temperature until thickened, 6 hours or longer; then cover and refrigerate. Makes about 1 1/3 cups. From Foodday.

RADICCHIO SALAD WITH SPANISH BLUE CHEESE AND PEPPERED ALMONDS
1 head butter lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
1 head radicchio, torn into bite-size pieces
8 ounces blue cheese (preferably Cabrales), crumbled
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
5 tablespoons almond oil or olive oil
Peppered Almonds
Combine lettuce, radicchio and cheese in large bowl. Pour vinegar into small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Toss lettuce mixture with vinaigrette. Season salad with salt and pepper. Sprinkle Peppered Almonds over and serve immediately.
Bon Appétit
March 2000
Asian Cabbage salad with Chicken
• 1 red jalapeño or Fresno chile with some seeds, chopped
• 1/3 cup vegetable oil
• 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
• 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
• 2 teaspoons light brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon fish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam)
• 1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
• Kosher salt
• 1/2 small head of red cabbage, thinly sliced (about 5 cups)
• 2 medium carrots, peeled, shredded
• 6 scallions, whites and pale greens only, thinly sliced
• 3 cups shredded rotisserie chicken
• 1 cup baby spinach, thinly sliced
• 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
• 1/4 cup chopped dry-roasted peanuts
• 1/2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
Preparation: Whisk chile, oil, lime juice, soy sauce, brown sugar, fish sauce, and ginger in a large bowl; season with salt. Add cabbage, carrots, scallions, chicken, spinach, and cilantro; toss to coat. Top with peanuts and sesame seeds.

Kim Chee (use for Napa Cabbage, Daikon and other vegetables)
This is a general kim chee recipe, adaptable to any vegetable, sent to us by our friend Daniel, who did an internship at the Cultured Pickle in the Bay Area. While these instructions are for turnip, cauliflower and carrot, the method works for any combination of vegetable.
-Shredded pickles: this is essentially the same method for sauerkraut but it works really well with root vegetables. Basically you shred the vegetables (with a food processor is easiest) and then salt them. The salt draws moisture out of the veggies creating a brine. Here are step-by-step instructions for this method.
1. Wash the roots and cauliflower and trim off any soft spots
2. Weigh all the veggies and record the weight
3. Calculate anywhere from 1.5 – 2% of the vegetable weight and weigh out that much salt.
4. Shred the root vegetables and cut the cauliflower into small pieces combining all in a giant bowl as you go.
5. Thoroughly mix the shredded roots and cauliflower with the salt (you can add any spices, chopped garlic, shredded ginger, minced anchovies, herbs or citrus zests that you want at this point. Be aware that garlic flavor tends to bloom and get stronger during the pickling process).
6. Let the mixture sit for a couple of hours and see how the liquid is drawn from the vegetables.
7. Pack the vegetables with their liquid into a crock or as many gallon glass jars as it takes to hold them. Try to press out as much air as you can and leave some head room because the fermentation will bubble up.
8. Put some sort of cover on the surface of the veggies and a weight on top of the cover to keep them pressed under their liquid. I like to use the outer leaves from a head of cabbage folded as needed to cover the shredded vegetables with a gallon jug of water as weight.
9. Let the jars ferment for anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks. It should be in a corner somewhere with a temp around 60-65 degrees Fahrenheit. Taste it as it goes. Push it back down every once in a while. Skim off any mold or white yeast blooms that show up on the surface (they are not harmful, don’t worry).
10. When the flavor has gotten sour enough for you, pack the pickles into jars in the fridge to stop them changing further, or move them to a cool root cellar. (If you want the pickles to be stable for months and years at above refrigeration temperature, you can up the salt percentage to near 3%.

-Whole Brined pickles: these are very easy and quick and take less shredding.
1. Wash and trim the vegetables
2. Cut the cauliflower into florets and if the roots are large I would cut them into about two-inch chunks.
3. Make a brine: measure out enough water that you will be able to cover all the prepared vegetables in your crock or gallon jars. Then dissolve in this water 50 percent of its weight in salt. For example, 1 liter of water gets 50 grams of salt, 6 liters gets 300 grams of salt. Also add any flavoring to the brine like flowering dill and smashed heads of garlic. I like to add a bunch of dried chiles. Chile flakes and ground spices are good too. You can also heat the brine to dissolve the salt and add the spices like a tea for more flavor, just make sure it has cooled completely before the next step.
4. Put all the prepped vegetables in your fermentation container and pour the brine over to cover them completely.
5. Again put some sort of cover with a weight to keep the vegetables from coming to the surface.
6. Let them ferment for at least two weeks. Check them as they go.
7. Refrigerate to stop the process or put in a cool place to slow it down.

Kohlrabi and Chicken Stew
Posted by Seth Just – June 1st, 2011
• 3-4 lb. Chicken
• 2 lb. kohlrabi/broccoli stems
• 3/4 lb. Carrots
• 4 Tb butter
• 4 cups sliced onions
• 1 cup peeled, chopped tomatoes
• 2 tsp salt
• 1 tsp black pepper
• pinch saffron threads
• 1/4 tsp turmeric
• 1/2 tsp cinnamon
• 2 tsp ground coriander
• 1 quart chicken broth or water
• 4 sprigs parsley
• 1/2 small cabbage
Cut chicken into serving pieces. Peel kohlrabis and/or broccoli stems; cut larger ones into 1-inch chunks. Cut cabbage into 1/4-inch strips. Peel carrots and slice diagonally into 1/2-inch thick pieces.
In a large saucepan, heat the butter and sauté the onions, tomatoes, salt and spices for 4-5 minutes. Add the chicken and cook for 5 minutes. Add the broth or water and parsley. Bring the broth to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the kohlrabis and carrots, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Finally, add the cabbage and simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes longer or until all the vegetables are completely tender.
Adapted from The Victory Garden Cookbook by Marian Morash

 

Celeriac Recipes

Celeriac and Tomato Soup

4 tomatoes                            2 cups water

2 # celeriac                            ¼ cup lovage chopped (optional)

3  leeks                                   1 onion

1 clove garlic                        1 large carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil         2 T butter

3 sprigs parsley                    6 cups chicken broth

salt and freshly ground pepper

Peel, seed, and roughly chop tomatoes.  Peel sufficient celeriac to make 1 ½ pounds trimmed flesh, then cut into ½ inch cubes and drop into acidulated water.  Wash and trim leeks and, using only the white and light green parts, thinly slice.  You should have 1 ½ cups.  Chop onion and combine with leeks.  Chop garlic.  Thinly slice carrot. Heat together oil and butter and sauté leeks and onion until wilted.  Add garlic and carrot, and cook for 5 minutes longer,  Add one third of the tomatoes and cook until they are lightly browned on the edges and the juice is evaporated.  Add drained celeriac, the rest to the tomatoes and the parsley sprig.  Cook together for 10 minutes.  Add chicken broth, water and lovage (if using).  Bring to a boil and reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Puree, season with salt and pepper, and serve with croutons on the side.  (serves 8)  For thinner soup only use 1 pound celeriac and 3 tomatoes.

CELERY ROOT BISQUE WITH THYME CROUTONS
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup coarsely chopped shallots (about 3 large)
2 pounds celery roots (celeriac), peeled, woody parts trimmed and discarded, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 5 1/2 cups)
1 10-ounce russet potato, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
5 cups low-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme

1/4 cup whipping cream
Additional chopped fresh thyme
Melt butter in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add celery; cover and cook until slightly softened, about 3 minutes. Add shallots; sauté uncovered 3 minutes. Stir in celery root cubes and potato, then broth and 1 1/2 teaspoons thyme. Increase heat to high; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 40 minutes. Cool slightly.

Working in batches, transfer soup to blender and puree until smooth. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead. Cool slightly. Cover and refrigerate.)

Stir cream into soup and bring to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Sprinkle with additional chopped thyme and serve.

Bon Appétit
November 2005

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

Serves 6-8

  • 3 T unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 12 whole curry leaves (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)
  • pinch freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.

Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.

Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.

Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE AND GINGER SHRIMP
24 large shrimp in shell (about 1 lb), peeled, leaving tail and first segment of shell intact, and deveined
1 tablespoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2/3 cup chopped shallot
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 3/4 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (5 cups)
4 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs
Toss shrimp with ginger in a bowl and marinate, chilled, 30 minutes (do not marinate any longer or enzymes from ginger will begin to cook shrimp).

Make soup while shrimp marinate: 
Cook shallot, garlic, and anise in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until shallot is softened, about 5 minutes. Add squash, stock, and water and simmer, uncovered, until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove star anise.

Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) until very smooth, about 1 minute per batch, then transfer to cleaned pan and keep warm, covered.

Sprinkle marinated shrimp with salt. Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté shrimp in 2 batches, stirring, until just cooked through, about 3 minutes per batch, transferring to paper towels.

Bring soup to a simmer and season with salt and pepper. Divide among 8 shallow soup bowls and mound 3 shrimp in each bowl.

Cooks’ note: 
. Soup (without shrimp) can be made 3 days ahead and chilled, covered. If making soup ahead, begin marinating shrimp about 40 minutes before serving.

Gourmet
December 2002

DELICATA SQUASH WITH ROSEMARY, SAGE, AND CIDER GLAZE

This is my favorite way to cook winter squash. You peel, and slice it, then cook it in a skillet with cider and
winter herbs. When most of the liquid boils away, the cider forms a tart-sweet glaze around the now-tender squash.

Delicata is a wonderfully firm-textured squash that’s not too sweet and almost like a potato. Other varieties like
acorn, turban, or kabocha will make good substitutes, but they may not hold their shape quite as well through the
braising.

2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm
winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice
1 cup water
2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.
  2. Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook,
    stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.
  3. Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender,
    20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

Roasted Winter Roots with Whole Garlic Heads
From The San Francisco Chronicle Cookbook

All vegetables may be cooked in the oven at the same time. The heads
of garlic, roasted alongside the vegetables, become a self-contained
spread that is delicious on country-style bread. Be sure to allow one
garlic head for each person.

4 carrots, about ½ pound total
2 parsnips, about ½ pound total
2 turnips, about 1 pound total
1 rutabaga, about 1 pound
2 yellow onions, about ¾ pound total
3 russet potatoes, about 1 ¾ pounds total
4 heads of garlic, about ½ pound total
1/3 C olive oil
1 ½ tsps salt
1Tbles freshly ground pepper
4 fresh thyme sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh rosemary sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh sage sprigs, or 1 tsp dried

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Peel the carrots, parsnips, turnips and rutabaga. Cut the
carrots into 2 inch lengths. Halve the parsnips crosswise, separating
the tapering root end from the thick upper portion. Cut the upper
portion lengthwise into 2 pieces. Quarter the turnips and rutabaga.
Peel the onions but do not cut off the root ends. Quarter the onions
lengthwise.
Scrub the potatoes and cut them lengthwise into quarters, then
in half. Cut off the upper quarter of the garlic heads, leaving the
heads intact, skin and all.
Combine half of the olive oil, the salt, pepper, thyme,
rosemary and sage in a large bowl. Add all of the vegetables,
including the garlic. Stir them until they are well coated with the
seasoned oil.
Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on 2 baking sheets.
Roast for 30 minutes. Stir the vegetables and baste with some of the
remaining olive oil. Continue roasting, stirring once or twice and
basting with olive oil, for 30 to 45 minutes longer, or until all the
vegetables are tender and are easily pierced with a fork. Remove from
the oven and transfer to a platter.
Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 4

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Week #28 – Harvest Festival Today!!

Week #28/29

The Weekly Share

  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Kale or chard
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatillos
  • Tomatoes (enjoy them while you can!!)
  • Green onions
  • Yellow onions
  • Parsley
  • Celery or celeriac (the brown ugly root makes for great soup or roasting)
  • Winter squash

The harvest festival is scheduled for later today. It is currently raining, which I am trying not to get down about. I keep reminding myself that I can’t change a thing by worrying, so I will just keep hoping for it to blow past the farm. The show will go on, rain or shine. We celebrate our farm’s 16th year, our barn’s 100th birthday and my sister’s birthday too! Quite a few things to be thankful for, even in the turbulent world.

We expect to see many of you later today for pizza making, cider pressing, pony rides and much more. We kick off the party with the Helvetia Alp Horns. The Taiko drummers are next, a new addition to our afternoon line-up. “Mexico en la Piel” will join us once again with splendid dancing and remarkable skill. Our afternoon will be punctuated by the walnut gathering competition, a farm tour and the blue grass jam session.

Please do check out the pumpkin patch, the show room with wreaths, birdfeeders, finquita t-shirts, artist prints and handmade soap.

I want to keep writing, but my adobado is waiting! Enjoy your veggies and don’t forget to sign-up for Thanksgiving share. Next week is the last week of the regular season!

Celery Root and Apple Salad with Toasted Walnuts 
serves 4 to 6

2 medium celery roots, peeled and cut into matchsticks
2 medium red delicious apples, cored and cut into matchsticks
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 green onions, thinly sliced
1 bunch watercress leaves

dressing:

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon mustard seed
1 tablespoon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
1 cup walnut halves, toasted

Combine the celery root and apple in a bowl and sprinkle with lemon juice. Toss with the green onion and watercress. Whisk the vinegar, mustard seed, mustard, honey and oil until well combined. Toss with the celery root mixture. Taste for salt and pepper and garnish with walnuts.

Celeriac Soup

Ingredients

  • small splasholive oil, plus a drizzle to serve
  • 100g slicedpancetta
  • small knob butter
  • 1 largeonion, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • large bunchthyme, leaves picked and set aside
  • 1celeriac, cut into chunks
  • 850ml freshchicken stock
  • 100ml double cream

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a large pan. Sizzle thepancettafor about 3 mins on each side until crisp, then remove to a plate and set aside. Melt the butter in the same pan, add the onion, bay leaf and thyme stalks, and cook for 10 mins until just starting to turn golden. Add theceleriac and cook for 2 mins more.
  2. Pour over the stock and simmer for 10 mins until the celeriac is soft. Stir in the cream and bring back to the boil. Fish out the bay and thyme stalks, then purée the soup until smooth. Stir through half the thyme leaves and ladle the soup into bowls. Serve topped with the crispy pancetta, the remaining thyme leaves and a drizzle of olive oil.

 

Squash Stew with Cauliflower and Tomatoes from Chef Jonathan Miller

onions, chopped
garlic cloves, chopped
2 tsp. cumin, ground
2 TBL dry oregano, toasted
2 TBL chili powder
2 lb hard squash, peeled and diced
8 oz mushrooms, cut into bite sized pieces
1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
3 TBL sesame seeds, toasted
small handful of almonds, toasted
2 lb tomatoes, crushed or pureed
1 cup frozen peas
small handful cilantro, chopped

Heat some olive oil in a large saucepan or soup pot. Add the onions and sauté until they have softened, about 8-10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, oregano, and the chili powder and cook another couple minutes. Add the squash, mushrooms, some salt, and 3 cups of water or vegetable stock. Bring to a boil, cover, lower heat and simmer slowly until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes. Stir regularly so the mixture doesn’t char on the bottom of the pot. Run almonds and sesame seeds in a food processor for a few seconds to finely chop them, then add to the stew with the cauliflower and tomatoes. Cook until the cauliflower is done to your liking, at least

Pumpkin or Winter Squash Puree
Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone Deborah Madison

Easy, versatile and useful, leftovers can fill ravioli, turn into a soup, or be added to muffins, breads, biscuits, and waffles. Preheat oven to 375 F. Halve, seed, and bake 3 pounds pumpkin or winter squash until tender, approx. 30 – 40 mins. Scrape the flesh away from the skin, then beat until smooth with a large wooden spoon This should be easy unless the squash is stringy, in which case, use a food processor or food mill. Stir in butter to taste and season with salt and pepper. Makes about 2 cups. To enrich the puree, grate Gruyére , Fountain, or Emmenthaler into it. Flavor with extra virgin olive oil, or dark sesame oil, or mix in sautéed onions.

 

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Week #27

  • Beets
  • Fennel
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Tomatoes or cherry tomatoes (they are winding down and the flavor is much less intense, time to add to soups!)
  • Peppers (green, red and stuffing)
  • Hot peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Beans
  • Dill
  • Broccoli or cauliflower or cabbage
  • Kohlrabi or radish
  • Carrots (the rainbow is here!)
  • Celeriac
  • Winter squash (quite the haul this year, you can expect quite a lot for the next three weeks and in the Thanksgiving share)

We had quite the monsoon wind yesterday with a torrential down pour around 2:30. We were so lucky it struck after we finished the farmers market or we could have been in real trouble. Even with the scare of bad weather the market went fairly well. We are in the fall wreath season so I have been busy in my studio creating new work on an almost daily basis. I will have fresh fall wreaths and birdfeeders available for purchase at the Harvest Festival.

We had a bumper crop of winter squash and pumpkins this year. We will have beautiful pie pumpkins for the Thanksgiving harvest (November 22,23) as well as the traditional acorn squash for the holiday. We hope to have Brussels by then, they are taking their sweet time ripening and the aphids are a constant battle. Sign-up and prepay starting today. We have room for 50 shares. We hope to have at least 20 items for you and your family to enjoy.

We are working on our very own pumpkin patch for our subscribers and for the harvest festival next Sunday. Please do visit the pumpkins in the hidden garden just behind our house. We have pumpkins of all shapes and sizes, huge stems, pink ones and tiny white ones. Priced as marked between $1- $10.

We are getting ready for the big event on October 18th. We have many different performers in the line up. The Helvetia Alp Horns will open the afternoon around 2:30 so get here early. We have Taiko drummers (new addition!)Thank you Maddie Bisgyer) to follow. They are a talented group from Sheridan Japanese School who will dazzle your eyes and ears with their performance.” Mexico en la Piel” will dance for us once again, keeping the  tradition alive. Our very own members will round out the afternoon with the bluegrass jam session. If you play music and want to join in please do contact us (or just bring your instrument and see how it goes.

The harvest festival is really a chance for all of us to enjoy the fall, appreciate the access we have to fresh food grown right here in the Willamette Valley, and mingle with old and meet new friends. Please see the flyer in last week’s post for a list of what to bring, mostly just remember to bring yourself and a pot luck dish and you are good to go.

We will finish out our season the last week of October. We will have a brief survey sent out and hope to get your feedback about what you liked and what we can improve. This is really a labor of love. We love vegetables and we love our community and want to provide the freshest and best vegetables possible. We want to bring people together and we want to share our love of the earth with all of you. We can’t do it without your help, and in some ways that what makes our farm unique. We ask for members to get their hands dirty, to help us bring in the harvest twice over the course of the 29 week season. So, you have 4 harvests left, sign-up today. We have our Wednesday helpers (a great crew that always sends at least two members from Ann, Catherine, Jean, Bob, Eldon, Marianne, Makaela), thank you, thank you. Sundays we used to have our kids, now we have Luna on occasion and we need YOU. The harvests are huge and cumbersome, so lend a hand.

Ben, one of our members took this great short video of the canning party so check it out, it may motivate you to join us next year (likely in August) https://youtu.be/GOvD2D6l1gs.

Now, off to paint signs and get that harvest in!

Check out this recipe sent to you from Sue Kass:

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/12159-leek-and-cardamom-fritters?utm_source=sharetools&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=website

 

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