Weekly Share #2

Week #2, 2018

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Chard or beet greens
  • Bok choi
  • Thyme or sage
  • Parsley or cilantro
  • Onions and shallots

This is the time of year that the winter veggie supply dwindles and the spring crops are not quite there yet. We have a beautiful bloom of kale in the fields with small micro leaves while the early spring planted kale has 3 edible leaves on each plant. This means a week without kale for you all. This next week of warm weather should send all the crops in our hoop houses into overdrive (we hope) and make our harvest in the next few weeks easier. For now it is the time of the herb and green, see the recipes I have for eggs with greens, make a green smoothie or stir fry.

Juvencio has been happily preparing the field for planting. I am not sure he would describe this as a happy event as he has to pull the drip irrigation from each bed. In the fall the irrigation is shut off, but we are usually exhausted and the pipes remain in the fields. Then in February the cover crop and weeds take off and grow over the pipes in a tangle that traps them below. It is a process to get the pipes out, the cover crop mowed and the fields spread with compost. Juvencio will then rough out the beds and hand till most of them just before I plant them. He often top dresses each bed with a pillow of fresh compost as well.

This warm weather not only dries out the soil allowing us to prep the ground but it gives the weeds the needed push to explode. At this time of year there is so much to do it is hard to know which direction to turn. Seed, plant, prep, weed, clean, many of these things need to be done simultaneously. Did I forget to mention the pests? Well, they are getting us from above ground (birds, mice, aphids, cucumber beetles) and from below ground (gophers, moles and the like) as we race to outsmart or out plant them. All this discussion just makes me want to stop writing and get out there and harvest! We hope to get the cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower in the ground this week. We managed to get two beds of lettuce, the shelling peas, kohlrabi and fennel planted yesterday. The onions, shallots and leeks are looming, I have over 25 flats of these grass-like seedlings to get into the ground by mid-May.

Next weekend I will start selling at the Beaverton Farmers Market. I sell with my friend and business partner Polly Gottesman from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens. We sell under her farm’s name and are there every Saturday from 8 – 1:30. We sell seedlings of vegetables, herbs and flowers. Please do come and visit me. I will also have some vegetable starts here at the farm for sale. I will put out a list of veggies in the next week or so for you to let me know what you would like to purchase.

Enjoy your week, here are some suggestions for your veggies this week:

Bok Choy:

from a CSA member:
Bok Choy: (the bok choy in the box was amazingly good!)

1 T oil
1.5 lbs bok choy
1 T light soy sauce
2 T chicken stock or water

Heat wok over moderate heat. Add oil and then bok choy. Stir fry 3-4
minutes, until leaves have wilted a little. Add soy sauce and chicken stock/water.
Continue to stir fry for a few more minutes, until the bok choy is done until still slightly
crisp.

Very easy, very good.
Source: Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery
(very good recipes, clear instructions, and excellent taste)

SAUTEED BOK CHOY W/ CASHEW SAUCE
Serving Size : 4
1/2 c Cashews — roasted
1/4 c White vinegar
1/4 c Water
1/4 c Sugar
1/4 c Soy sauce
1 tb Ginger — minced
7 dashes Tabasco sauce
2 tb Basil — finely chopped
2 tb Mint — finely chopped
1 1/2 lb Bok choy — washed & dried 1/3 c Peanut oil 1. In a food processor or blender, combine the cashews, vinegar, water, sugar, soy sauce, ginger, Tabasco, basil and mint, and puree. 2. Separate bok choy leaves from stalks, and cut stalks into 1-inch-long- pieces. In a large sauté pan, heat oil over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add bok choy and cook, stirring briskly, for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, until it is bright green and well seared. Remove from heat, drape with cashew sauce and serve at once. Yield: 4 servings. Approximate nutritional analysis per serving: 340 calories, 25 grams fat, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 1,065: milligrams sodium, 7 grams protein, 25 grams carbohydrate. ** New York Times — Living Arts section — 29 November 1995 **

Bok Choy Stir Fry

This is an easy recipe.

1 1/2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry Sherry
1 teaspoon oriental sesame oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
3 1/2 cups thinly sliced trimmed bok choy
1 5-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained
3 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces
10 1/2 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

Combine first 4 ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Heat vegetable oil until very hot in heavy large wok or skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and crushed red pepper. Stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add bok choy and stir-fry until just wilted, about 2 minutes. Mix in water chestnuts and green onions and stir-fry until onions are tender, about 1 minute. Add tofu and lightly stir-fry until tofu is just heated through, about 2 minutes. Pour over soy mixture. Stir-fry until liquid boils and thickens, about 1 minute.

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

 

Spinach Soup

Chez Panisse Vegetables, Alice Waters

 

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is till delicious!)

 

1 onion

1 clove of garlic

1 small carrot

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 cups chicken broth

½ cup parsley leaves

2 bunches young spinach

2 sprigs fresh tarragon

2 tablespoons crème fraiche

 

Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin.  Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

 

Serves 6

 

 

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The Season begins! Week #1 2018

Week #1, 2018

  • Salad mix – these are the bitter greens of They require a nice dressing and some good cheese, either blue, gorgonzola, parmesan, or manchego to cut the bitter. (some recipes are listed below).  If it is too bitter for you super tasters don’t dismay, you will be forgiven for not eating it and adding it to your compost. Please do try soaking it in ice water for 30 – 60 minutes, it makes a huge difference.
  • Shallots – nice and spicy held over from last years harvest, great in soups
  • Swiss Chard or beet greens– a nice mild green to use in stir fry or in your morning smoothie.
  • Spinach – take note of the intense color, full of vitamins and cooks down to a reasonable amount!
  • Leeks – nice to use the white parts and some of the pale green in soups
  • Cauliflower – this is the last of the overwintering wonder. We planted these in August of last year and the plants held in the field all winter. In February they started to grow and headed up over the last few weeks. Enjoy them roasted (our favorite) with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper.
  • Sprouting broccoli – a seasonal favorite that peaked in March. We have a bit left for you, but we can’t control mother nature so more than 200 feet of broccoli went to waste L
  • Radishes
  • Parsley or Cilantro

The day has finally come! We are so excited to open our 19th season of growing vegetables. The time has flown by and we have learned so many things and there remain so many mysteries! We took a mini vacation and now will pay the piper as we race to harvest, clean the farm, barn and pizza and make the food we will enjoy later on.

We have had a challenging winter. The saddest news is that my father, Steve, whom many of you know and have had the pleasure of meeting over the years around the farm, died on December 31st. He died at home, surrounded by his family. His last few weeks were made comfortable with the help of hospice. I have not really known how to include this in previous announcements, so add it here so that you will know. His death has left an emptiness in our family and we are still working through this. My mom is doing quite well as she forges ahead in life after 57 years with the love of her life. She joined us in Santa Cruz for my sister’s art opening which was the first vacation she has had in over two years.

Our season opening potluck starts today at 2:00 and runs until 6:00. Please drop in and enjoy the food, music and a tour of the farm. The show must go on rain or shine and it seems like rain is what we will have. We have tents, and our deck that are covered and so  plan to get a bit wet. Part of what makes La Finquita different is the community we strive to create among our subscribers. You will have the opportunity to meet like minded (or at least like eaters) people who are committed to eating seasonal, local food grown with care and consideration for the environment and the people who will be consuming those vegetables. The pizza oven will be fired up and you can build your own pizza. BYOB, and pizza topping.

 

We still have space for more subscribers and we know from experience that the best subscribers come from current subscribers, so tell your friends! This is a unique opportunity to see where your veggies are grown. We have a veggie pool that helps people who live in Portland get there veggie dropped in their neighborhood and reduces the number of visits one has to make to the farm. Spread the word and have people contact us via email: lynjuve@msn.com

 

We look forward to getting to know each of you over the course of the season. Please do let us know if there is something you want us to grow or if something is not to your liking so that we can try and meet your needs. We want happy subscribers and we want you to eat your veggies every day!

Spinach Soup

(When I make this I never have all the ingredients and I’ve never used the crème fraiche and it is still delicious!)

  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 small carrot
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • ½ cup parsley leaves
  • 2 bunches young spinach
  • 2 sprigs fresh tarragon
  • 2 tablespoons crème fraiche
  • Peel the onion and garlic, and slice thin. Peel the carrot and dice fine.

In a large pot, stew the onion, garlic, and carrot in the olive oil, covered until soft an translucent.  Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil, and simmer uncovered for about 15 minutes.

Prepare a large bowl half filled with ice and smaller bowl, preferably stainless steel, that will fit inside and rest on the ice.

Wash the parsley and spinach and add them to the pot with the chicken stock and other vegetables.  Shut off the heat and allow the soup to stand, uncovered, for 5 minutes, no longer.  Immediately puree the soup in a blender and pour it through a medium mesh strainer into the bowl in the ice bath.  Stir the soup slowly with a spoon or spatula until it has cooled to room temperature and then remove it from the ice.  Quick cooling preserves the color of the soup.  Chop enough tarragon to make about  1 Tablespoon and stir it into the crème fraiche.  To serve the soup reheat it to just below the boil point and garnish each bowl with a teaspoon of the crème fraiche.

Serves 6

Garbanzos y Acelgas

Chickpeas and chard (or spinach)

9 ounces of dried chickpeas

1 carrot, diced

1 sprig flat leaf parsley

1 bay leaf

2 yellow onions 1/3 cup olive oil

1 garlic clove, chopped

2 tomatoes, chopped

9 ounces or 1 bunch chard, beet greens or spinach (more is even better)

2 eggs (hard boiled or fried and placed on top of each portion)

Put the chickpeas in a bowl, cover with cold water and soak overnight.

Drain and rinse the chickpeas and put in a large saucepan with the carrot, parsley, bay leaf and half the chopped onion. Cover with water then bring to a boil and cook about 20 minutes or until almost tender. Add 2 teaspoons salt and half the oil and cook for another 10 minutes. Heat the remaining olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and cook the garlic and remaining onion for 5 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomato and cook for 5 minutes. Stir the tomato mixture into the chickpea mixture (it should be wet enough to be saucy but not too soupy). Stir in the chard, beet greens or spinach. Cook for 5 minutes or until the greens are tender. Season well and serve with either the hard boiled egg or fried egg on top.

Serves 4

Lyn’s Salad Dressing

 

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 clove garlic pressed

 

Add all ingredients to a Mason jar and cover with lid.  Shake until creamy and well blended.

 

Spinach, Radish Slaw with Crispy Chiles and Pepitas
2 tablespoons Sherry wine vinegar
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
6 dried Anaheim or dried New Mexico chiles,* stemmed
Canola oil
2/3 cup shelled raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
4 9-ounce bags spinach leaves (not baby spinach)
2 10-ounce bunches large red radishes, trimmed
4 ounces Cotija cheese or feta cheese, crumbled

Whisk both vinegars and mustard in small bowl. Gradually whisk in olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD:Dressing can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before using.

Cut chiles in half lengthwise; discard seeds. Using scissors, cut chiles crosswise into 1/4-inch strips. Pour enough canola oil into large skillet to reach depth of about 1/8 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Add chiles and fry until beginning to crisp, about 45 seconds. Using slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain. Add pepitas to same skillet and fry until golden brown and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to another set of paper towels to drain. Sprinkle chiles and pepitas with salt. Cool completely. DO AHEAD: Can be made 1 day ahead. Store airtight at room temperature.

Line 1 large bowl and 1 small bowl with paper towels. Working in batches, stack spinach leaves into piles and cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Transfer to prepared large bowl.

Using grating disk on processor, grate radishes. Place in strainer set over another bowl; drain 15 minutes. Transfer to small bowl lined with paper towels. DO AHEAD: Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover; chill.

Place spinach, radishes, chiles, pepitas, and cheese in very large bowl. Toss with dressing. Season with salt and pepper.

* Available at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores and Latin markets.

Bon Appétit
December 2008
by Tori Ritchie

Radish Top Soup

 

Don’t through out your radish greens.  Believe it or not, those fuzzy leaves can be transformed into a smooth green soup, with a hint of watercress flavor.

 

6 tablespoons butter

1 cup chopped onions or white part of leek

8 cups loosely packed radish leaves

2 cups diced potatoes

6 cups liquid (water, chicken stock or combo)

salt

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

freshly ground pepper

 

Melt 4 T butter in a large saucepan, add onions or leeks and cook until golden, approximately 5 minutes.  Stir in radish tops cover pan and cook over low heat until wilted, 8-10 minutes.  Meanwhile cook potatoes until soft in liquid along with 1 teaspoon of salt.  Combine with the radish tops and cook covered, for 5 minutes to mingle flavors.  Puree finely in a food processor of food mill.  Ad the cream if desired and enrich with 2 T of butter.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve hot. (serves 4-6)

Favorite Escarole Salad as Martin prepares it:

4 heads escarole, dark outer leaves removed, washed and torn into large bowl. Dress with: olive oil, sherry or champagne vinegar, shaved parmesan, S & P, and truffle oil. this is very very delicious.

Wilted Escarole

3 T olive oil
2 medium escarole – rinsed, dried and chopped
1/2 cup lemon juice
chopped zest from one lemon
2 tablespoons capers, roughly/barely chopped
10 dark, pitted olives, kalamata are good here
ground black pepper to taste

Heat oil in a large frying pan over high heat. Add escarole; cook and stir until greens begin to wilt. Stir in lemon juice & zest. Add capers, S & P, and olives; cook and stir for another 15-30 seconds.

Blanched Escarole with Fried Capers

from 366 Healthful Ways to Cook Leafy Greens by Linda Romanelli Leahy

1 bunch escarole (about 1 pound), trimmed and shredded
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted capers, drained
1/2 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper
2 teaspoons thinly sliced lemon zest for garnish, optional

  1. Drop the escarole in a pot of salted boiling water. Cook 3 to 5 minutes until it is as tender as you like. Drain well.
    2. While the escarole is cooking, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the capers and cook 2 minutes; remove with a slotted spoon.
    3. Stir in the drained escarole, salt and pepper and heat through. Place on a serving plate and top with the capers and lemon zest, if using. Serve immediately. Serves 4

 

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The New Season Begins 4/15/18

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We are busy weeding hoop houses, transplanting tomatoes into  4 inch pots and some into the hoop house already. We had strong winds and tons of rain yesterday, not great for the gardens or the plastic covering the hoop houses. We saw the bald eagle eating another one of our ducks. She/He has made it a habit and that will be hard to break. She/He trades off between us and Marian Acres at the corner on which fowl she likes better.

Next Sunday is our opening potluck/pizza party. We will start around 2 and end at 6. We hope you and your friends will join us, rain or shine for a community gathering with food and farm tours and veggie pick up if that is your day to pick up. Juve, Luna and I will bring in the first harvest that morning. We look forward to lots of yummy greens and hopefully some overwintered broccoli and cauliflower.

We still have openings for the 2018 season, so spread the word, we have full and half shares available. Have them email us at lynjuve@msn.com to join or ask questions.

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Thanksgiving harvest 2017

Thanksgiving Harvest 2017

  • Lettuce
  • Sage or thyme
  • Parsley
  • Bok coi
  • Kale
  • Spinach or chard
  • Celery or celeriac
  • Cilantro or dill
  • Broccoli, cauliflower or romanesco
  • Brussels sprouts (hurrah we did it!!)
  • Green peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Tomatoes (green tomato pie or fried green tomatoes here we come!)
  • Winter squash
  • Pie pumpkin
  • Shallots
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Green onions
  • Radishes or turnips
  • Radicchio  the greatest tip is to wash the radicchio in cold water and then let it rest in ice water at least 30 minutes, you will note, no more bitter!)
  • Fennel

It is really here, the end of fall and the end of the 2017 season. We have been gifted with mild temperatures that allowed us to keep the broccoli going, especially considering the late start to this fall favorite. The greenhouses have helped get you some of the biggest lettuces we have grown all season. I planted them when we pulled the melons in mid September and it is paying off. Luna and I started to harvest on Friday to be able to get you this huge bounty by Sunday at a reasonable time. Juvencio took a surprise trip to Honduras to be with his family as they celebrate his father’s 90th birthday. We are so glad he could go and share in the festivities. The surprise alone was worth it.

I will have soup, cookies and warm drinks to share in the barn on Sunday afternoon for those who choose to pick up there veggies then. The barn is open for pick up on Monday as well, but the treats won’t be there. My studio is decked out in fall slender. I have wreaths, bird feeders and my newest ceramics. I may have a few evergreen wreaths as well. Please take a look around.

We are always pleased to get word that you will continue in 2018. A deposit of $100 is also welcome to reserve your spot. Send us your referrals, your friends make our best customers as they come to us knowing a bit more what to expect and have a trusted friend encouraging them to get on the local food/slow food movement train.

Here are some of my favorite recipes. It is time for soup and lots of items I have included in today’s harvest are great roasted or put in soups. Enjoy your holiday with those you love and those who need a warm place to rest and a hearty meal. We are deeply grateful for the opportunity to grow food for your family. This work feeds us as well in so many ways.

Curried Winter Squash Soup

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

 

Serves 6-8

 

3 T unsalted butter

1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed

4 cups chicken or vegetable stock

1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes

12 whole curry leaves (optional)

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)

pinch freshly grated nutmeg

2 teaspoons curry powder

salt

freshly ground pepper

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

 

  1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.
  3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
  4. Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

 

 

SPICED WINTER SQUASH WITH FENNEL
1 1 1/2-pound butternut squash, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, halved crosswise, then cut lengthwise into 3/4-inch-wide wedges
1 fennel bulb, trimmed, cut lengthwise into 1-inch-wide wedges
1 large onion, root end left intact, then cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch-wide wedges
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 450°F. Combine squash, fennel, and onion on heavy large rimmed baking sheet. Add oil and toss to coat. Mix all spices in small bowl to blend. Sprinkle spice mixture over vegetables and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt and generous amount of pepper. Roast until vegetables are tender and browned, turning once, about 45 minutes. Transfer to shallow dish and serve.

Bon Appétit
October 2004

 

Roasted Cauliflower and Radicchio Salad
1 large head cauliflower (3 to 3 1/2 punds), cut into 1-inch-wide florets (9 cups)
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup white-wine vinegar
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
2 heads romaine (2 pounds total), cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide strips
1 large head radicchio (3/4 pound), cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide strips
1 cup loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves (from 1 bunch)
1/2 cup hazelnuts (2 1/4 ounces), toasted , any loose skins rubbed off in a kitchen towel, and nuts coarsely chopped

Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 450°F.

Toss cauliflower with 1/4 cup oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper in a large bowl. Spread in 1 layer in a shallow baking pan (1 inch deep) and roast, turning over with tongs halfway through roasting, until tender and golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes total. Cool in pan on a rack, then transfer to large bowl.

Whisk together vinegar, shallot, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper in a small bowl, then add remaining 5 tablespoons oil in a slow stream, whisking until emulsified. Add half of dressing to cauliflower and toss to coat. Add romaine, radicchio, parsley, half of nuts, and remaining dressing to cauliflower and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with remaining nuts.

Crunchy Spring Salad with Dill Dressing

Serves 6 as a side dish

For the salad:
8 ounces (about 2 cups) sugar snap peas, trimmed
4 small radishes, thinly sliced (I use a mandoline)
3 small stalks celery, sliced crosswise into bite-size pieces
1 large romaine heart, chopped into bite-size pieces

For the dressing:
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons minced fresh dill
1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon minced shallot
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Place all the salad ingredients in a large bowl and set aside.

In a small bowl, whisk together the vinegar and salt until the salt dissolves. Add dill, mustard and shallot and whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in olive oil, whisking constantly, until dressing is smooth and emulsified. Pour dressing over salad and toss until all ingredients are evenly coated.

Additional Notes

  • Salad will keep, dressed and refrigerated, for up to 6 hours. For longer storage, keep chopped and assembled salad ingredients covered in the refrigerator up to 1 day ahead and toss with dressing just before serving.

 

 

 

Cilantro and lime chicken

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1/4 c. chopped fresh cilantro
  • pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp. cumin
  • 4 bone-in skin-on chicken thighs
  • kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • cooked white rice, for serving

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make marinade: Whisk together 2 tablespoons olive oil, lime juice, cilantro, red pepper flakes, garlic and cumin. Add chicken and toss to evenly coat with the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours.
  2. When you’re ready to cook the chicken, preheat oven to 425°.
  3. Pour remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil into a large oven-proof skillet and heat over medium-high heat. Season both sides of marinated chicken with salt and pepper, then add chicken skin-side down and pour in the remaining marinade. Sear until the skin becomes golden and crispy, about 6 minutes. Flip the chicken and cook for 2 minutes more. (Chicken should not yet be cooked through.)
  4. Turn off the heat and transfer pan into hot oven; bake until the chicken is cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes.
  5. Serve with white rice and drizzle with extra pan drippings.

 

Bok Choy:

from a CSA member:
Bok Choy: (the bok choy in the box was amazingly good!)

1 T oil
1.5 lbs bok choy
1 T light soy sauce
2 T chicken stock or water

Heat wok over moderate heat. Add oil and then bok choy. Stir fry 3-4
minutes, until leaves have wilted a little. Add soy sauce and chicken stock/water.
Continue to stir fry for a few more minutes, until the bok choy is done until still slightly
crisp.

Very easy, very good.
Source: Ken Hom’s Chinese Cookery
(very good recipes, clear instructions, and excellent taste)

SAUTEED BOK CHOY W/ CASHEW SAUCE
Serving Size : 4
1/2 c Cashews — roasted
1/4 c White vinegar
1/4 c Water
1/4 c Sugar
1/4 c Soy sauce
1 tb Ginger — minced
7 dashes Tabasco sauce
2 tb Basil — finely chopped
2 tb Mint — finely chopped
1 1/2 lb Bok choy — washed & dried 1/3 c Peanut oil 1. In a food processor or blender, combine the cashews, vinegar, water, sugar, soy sauce, ginger, Tabasco, basil and mint, and puree. 2. Separate bok choy leaves from stalks, and cut stalks into 1-inch-long- pieces. In a large sauté pan, heat oil over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add bok choy and cook, stirring briskly, for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, until it is bright green and well seared. Remove from heat, drape with cashew sauce and serve at once. Yield: 4 servings. Approximate nutritional analysis per serving: 340 calories, 25 grams fat, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 1,065: milligrams sodium, 7 grams protein, 25 grams carbohydrate. ** New York Times — Living Arts section — 29 November 1995 **

Bok Choy Stir Fry

This is an easy recipe.

1 1/2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry Sherry
1 teaspoon oriental sesame oil
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1/8 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
3 1/2 cups thinly sliced trimmed bok choy
1 5-ounce can sliced water chestnuts, drained
3 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces
10 1/2 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, cut into 3/4-inch pieces

Combine first 4 ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Heat vegetable oil until very hot in heavy large wok or skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and crushed red pepper. Stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add bok choy and stir-fry until just wilted, about 2 minutes. Mix in water chestnuts and green onions and stir-fry until onions are tender, about 1 minute. Add tofu and lightly stir-fry until tofu is just heated through, about 2 minutes. Pour over soy mixture. Stir-fry until liquid boils and thickens, about 1 minute.

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #29 Last Harvest of the regular 2017 season

 

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes or Kohlrabi
  • Parsley
  • Cabbage or broccoli or cauliflower
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes (say good bye to summer, try adding roasting them and adding them to soup)
  • Sweet peppers red and green
  • Hot peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Leeks or celeriac
  • Green onions
  • Gourds or pumpkins
  • Spinach or arugula

Well it is hard to believe that the 2017 season is drawing to an end. Juvencio and I got some of the harvest done on Saturday before he had to drop me at the airport. I am off to a conference, leaving him and Luna to bring in the harvest on this soggy weekend. We have had a hard year, harder than others. Spring had many challenges with weather, greenhouses, soil conditions. Summer was better, aliums (onions) were great as were peppers and tomatoes. Fall we have struggled to get some of our standards ready in time for the end of the season. Broccoli and cauliflower and cabbage have not really come on yet and we are heading into the rainy season. I guess you could say we are glad 2017 is ending. We look forward to better luck and magic next season.

The Harvest Festival could not have been more lovely weather wise. It was sunny and warm and not a drop of rain. People seemed to enjoy themselves, cider was made, peppers were roasted and dancers danced. After the official dancers we had little dancers enjoying the beat of our own blues pick up band. There was a lot of pizza made and more dough was brought out as the afternoon wore on. By 6 I had to make another recipe to feed the sweeper crew. Hopefully I will remember the pearls for next year.

 

We are busy getting bulbs in the ground, garlic planted, cover crop seeded and old crops pulled out of the ground. We want to rest , but truthfully it is not time yet. We have walnuts to gather that have not fallen yet from the trees. We hope to get more of it done this week as the weather brightens one last time before the true fall settles in.

We have lots of goodies for you in the barn!

  • Beef is here, $6/# in the freezer next to the cooler. Let us know if you need more, we have about 300# more at the meating place waiting for us to have room. It comes in 1 and 2 pound bags so be aware of what you are picking up.
  • Our friend Kris has brought us Chanterelles, he is offering them at a very low price to our subscribers, available in the cooler
  • Kris also had a bumper crop of honey and has some for sale in the cooler, priced as marked on the jar.
  • Sign up for the Thanksgiving harvest, it will be big. We would like you to prepay the $40 if possible so we don’t have to try and track you down that day. The pick up is 11/19 or 11/20. I will be selling wreaths, bird feeders, holiday wreaths and ceramics that weekend and after Thanksgiving as well so stop into my studio.
  • Sign up for 2018 season!
  • Consider joining our winter share, we will harvest 12 times over the next 5 months. It averages twice a month. We have a few spots left, first come first serve.
  • Please do answer the survey questions I put out earlier this week, your feedback is welcome and will hopefully will help us for next year.

I am going to sign off for now. I leave in just a few hours. We thank you for being part of our community and letting our family grow vegetables for yours. See you around the farm.

 

Here are some fun recipes to try with your veggies this week:

Spiced Pork with Celery Root Purée and Lentils
Celery Root Puree
2 pounds celery root (celeriac), peeled, cut into 2-inch cubes
5 cups whole milk
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
Ground white pepper

Lentils
3 bacon slices, chopped
1/4 cup 1/8-inch cubes peeled carrots
1/4 cup chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups dried lentils
3 cups water
1 teaspoon butter

Pork
1/2 cup honey
6 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
2 1/2 pounds pork tenderloins
1 tablespoon olive oil

3/4 cup low-salt chicken broth
1 tablespoon cold butter

For celery root puree:
Bring celery root and milk to boil in heavy large saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until celery root is very tender, about 20 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer celery root to processor. Add 1/2 cup hot milk. Puree until very smooth. Blend in butter and lemon juice. Season with salt and white pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

For lentils:
Sauté bacon in medium saucepan over medium-high heat until crisp, about 3 minutes. Add carrots, shallots, and rosemary; sauté until shallots begin to soften, about 1 minute. Add lentils and 3 cups water; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered until lentils are tender and liquid has nearly evaporated, about 35 minutes. Stir in butter. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.)

vFor pork:
Preheat oven to 400°F. Whisk first 4 ingredients in bowl. Sprinkle pork with salt and pepper. Heat oil in large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add pork; sauté until brown on all sides, about 6 minutes total. Brush pork with honey mixture. Transfer skillet to oven; roast pork 10 minutes. Turn pork over and brush with honey mixture. Roast until thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 145°F, about 10 minutes longer. Transfer pork to work surface; tent with foil (temperature will increase 5 degrees).

Add broth and remaining honey mixture to same skillet. Boil over high heat until sauce is reduced to 3/4 cup, about 5 minutes. Strain sauce into small bowl. Return sauce to skillet. Whisk in butter. Season with salt and pepper.

Rewarm celery root puree and lentils. Cut pork crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Place 1/2 cup celery root puree in center of each of 6 plates. Using back of spoon, make indentation in puree. Spoon 1/2 cup lentils into indentation on each plate. Arrange pork slices atop lentils and drizzle with sauce.

Bon Appétit
September 2003

 

Celeriac and Tomato Soup

 

4 tomatoes                            2 cups water

2 # celeriac                            ¼ cup lovage chopped (optional)

3  leeks                                   1 onion

1 clove garlic                        1 large carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil         2 T butter

3 sprigs parsley                    6 cups chicken broth

salt and freshly ground pepper

 

Peel, seed, and roughly chop tomatoes.  Peel sufficient celeriac to make 1 ½ pounds trimmed flesh, then cut into ½ inch cubes and drop into acidulated water.  Wash and trim leeks and, using only the white and light green parts, thinly slice.  You should have 1 ½ cups.  Chop onion and combine with leeks.  Chop garlic.  Thinly slice carrot. Heat together oil and butter and sauté leeks and onion until wilted.  Add garlic and carrot, and cook for 5 minutes longer,  Add one third of the tomatoes and cook until they are lightly browned on the edges and the juice is evaporated.  Add Curried Winter Squash Soup

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

 

Serves 6-8

 

3 T unsalted butter

1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed

4 cups chicken or vegetable stock

1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes

12 whole curry leaves (optional)

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)

pinch freshly grated nutmeg

2 teaspoons curry powder

salt

freshly ground pepper

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

 

  1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.
  3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
  4. Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

adrained celeriac, the rest to the tomatoes and the parsley sprig.  Cook together for 10 minutes.  Add chicken broth, water and lovage (if using).  Bring to a boil and reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Puree, season with salt and pepper, and serve with croutons on the side.  (serves 8)  For thinner soup only use 1 pound celeriac and 3 tomatoes.

 

 

Celeriac and Cheese Puree

 

1 large celeriac (2-3 lbs.)

2 large eggs

1/2 c. whole milk or half-and-half

salt and pepper

1 c. grated Gruyere

1 c. plain yogurt

3 Tbsp. lemon juice

1 Tbsp. fresh parsley

 

Quarter celeriac, cook in boiling water until tender (about 30 minutes).  Drain.  Puree, using as much of the milk or half-and-half as necessary to get the mixture smooth.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Combine puree, egg yolks, remaining milk, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl.  Beat until well-blended and stir in cheese.  Beat egg whites into soft peaks and fold into celeriac mixture.

Pour into a large buttered casserole or a 5-by-9-inch loaf pan.  There must be enough room for the mixture to rise.  Cover and bake until a tester comes out clean, about 30 to 40 minutes.

Allow to cool for 5 minutes and unmold onto a serving plate.  Serve with a sauce made of the yogurt, lemon juice and parsley.

From the Winter Harvest Cookbook by Lane Morgan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #28 – Harvest Party today!!

Week #28

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes
  • Parsley
  • Cilantro or dill or basil
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes (say good bye to summer, try adding roasting them and adding them to soup)
  • Sweet peppers red and green
  • Hot peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Kohlrabi
  • Celeriac (celery root, great for soups)

Harvest Festival TODAY from 2-6!  Come party with us here at La Finquita! We have set up our pumpkin patch. We have a walnut collecting race, farm tours, pizza making, cider pressing, pepper roasting. “Mexico en la Piel “ , (Mexico in my skin) will be dancing at 4:30, Blue grass pick up band to follow. I have new ceramics and festival fall wreaths for sale as well as bird feeders. Bring your friends and family and come join us at the farm today.

Next week is the last harvest for the regular 2017 season. Please let us know if you want to purchase the Thanksgiving basket,($40) packed with all the delicious veggies you will want to use at your Thanksgiving table. Going away for Thanksgiving?? No worries these veggies travel well, take them to your host and enjoy them there or store them easily until you return. No excuses not to enjoy another week of fresh fall and winter veggies.

Earthquake Relief

We are collecting new or old tents and tarps to send to Oaxaca. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn. Last Day to drop off is 10/15/17.

CSA Coalition Hiring!

CSA Coalition is hiring by forwarding this to your members, friends, coworkers, family, neighbors, etc. You can find the application here: portlandcsa.org/jobs.

“We are hiring a part-time Program Director to take the lead implementing all of our programming: annual share fair, SNAP processing, tabling at events, website maintenance, and community outreach/marketing. First and foremost we are looking for someone with demonstrated passion for helping small farms thrive and a commitment to seeing this job through the next few years. Our ideal candidate would also have a flexible schedule and excel when working alone. Finally, just like a farmer, we need a candidate who is a jack-of-all-trades with an array of skills in areas like marketing, event planning, fundraising, grant writing, website design, social media, computers and more.”!

 

Sign-up for:

  • Thanksgiving share – sheet in the cooler! (available for pick up November 19,20)
  • 2018 Season – sheet in the cooler! (same price as this year!)
  • Ground Beef – sheet in the cooler! ($6/#) coming next week.
  • Please complete your survey and send it to us at La Finquita, your feedback is appreciated!

 

Take Action:

  • If you live in Hillsboro get out and work to help pass the school bond. This bond does not increase taxes you are already paying, but rather renews a tax you are paying and directs those funds towards upgrades in classrooms, seismic upgrades and increased security at our schools. Visit https://www.hsd.k12.or.us/bond

 

Pasta with Butternut Squash and Kale Pesto

INGREDIENTS

 

1 ½ pounds butternut squash

½ cup extra virgin olive oil, more for drizzling

¾ teaspoon kosher salt, more for squash

Freshly ground black pepper

1 small bunch (about 1/2 pound) lacinato kale, center ribs removed

8 ounces pasta (penne rigate works well)

⅓ cup toasted pine nuts

2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped

Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

Freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste

Grated Parmesan cheese, for serving

PREPARATION

 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Use a vegetable peeler to peel squash, then halve it lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Dice squash flesh into 1-inch pieces, place on a baking sheet, and toss with olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread pieces into an even layer, making sure there is space between them. Roast, stirring squash pieces once or twice, until golden brown and tender, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; have ready a bowl of ice water. Drop kale into boiling water and cook for 45 seconds. Use tongs or slotted spoon to transfer kale to ice water. Bring water in pot back to a boil, adding more if necessary so there is enough to cook pasta.

Drain kale well, then wrap tightly in a dry kitchen towel and squeeze thoroughly to remove any excess moisture. Roughly chop leaves. When water in pot comes back to a boil, cook pasta according to package directions.

In a food processor, pulse together kale, nuts, garlic, salt and lemon zest until mixture is smooth and salt has dissolved. With motor running, slowly drizzle in the oil until fully incorporated. Taste and add more salt dissolved in a little lemon juice, if necessary.

Drain pasta, reserving a little cooking water. Toss pasta with kale pesto and some pasta cooking water if necessary to help it coat pasta. Add cheese, lemon juice and salt to taste. Serve topped with squash and more cheese.

 

 

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Week #27

 

  • Lettuce
  • Cilantro or basil or parsley
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Kohlrabi
  • Radishes or beans or Chinese cabbage (grab bag of available veggies)
  • Kale or chard
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Fruit

 

We have two more harvests after this week! It is hard to believe but the 2017 season is winding down

Earthquake Relief

We have good friends who live part time in Oaxaca and part time in Portland. Their home was not damaged in the earthquake and the >500 aftershocks, but they are traveling to southern Mexico in three weeks. They will be taking a truck full of supplies for victims of the earthquakes. This is where you come in! We are collecting new or old tents and tarps for them to take. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn. Last Day to drop off is 10/15/17.

Harvest Party

If you have not put this event on your calendar this is your opportunity! Sunday October 15 from 2-6 p.m. Be there or be square. See and print out the attached flyer and post on your fridge. You are welcome to bring family and friends and show off your farm. We plan to have cider pressing, pepper roasting, music , traditional Mexican dancing and more. I am busy making ceramic mugs and wreaths and bird feeders for sale.

CSA Coalition Hiring!

CSA Coalition is hiring by forwarding this to your members, friends, coworkers, family, neighbors, etc. You can find the application here: portlandcsa.org/jobs.

“We are hiring a part-time Program Director to take the lead implementing all of our programming: annual share fair, SNAP processing, tabling at events, website maintenance, and community outreach/marketing. First and foremost we are looking for someone with demonstrated passion for helping small farms thrive and a commitment to seeing this job through the next few years. Our ideal candidate would also have a flexible schedule and excel when working alone. Finally, just like a farmer, we need a candidate who is a jack-of-all-trades with an array of skills in areas like marketing, event planning, fundraising, grant writing, website design, social media, computers and more.”!

 

Sign-up for:

  • Thanksgiving share – sheet in the barn!
  • 2018 Season – sheet in the barn! (same price as this year!)
  • Ground Beef – sheet in the barn! ($6/#)

 

Take Action:

  • If you live in Hillsboro get out and work to help pass the school bond. This bond does not increase taxes you are already paying, but rather renews a tax you are paying and directs those funds towards upgrades in classrooms, seismic upgrades and increased security at our schools. Visit https://www.hsd.k12.or.us/bond

 

  • Tell your MOC to support the Dreamers and sign on to co-sponsor legislation to make their path permanent. Here are some direct links to action:
    1. https://act.credoaction.com/sign/DACA_Dems?t=3&akid=25327%2E1822401%2EHG_riN
    2. http://ijpr.org/post/immigrants-make-mark-oregons-economy#stream/0 My friend and colleague is featured here, see her family story here how twin sisters, daughters of migrant farmworkers became family physicians working to serve the most needy in our community.
  • Tell your MOC to pass restrictions on bump stock attachments to make semi-automatic rifles fully automatic.
  • Send money to help hurricaine victims, earthquake victims and the families who have been affected by the horrible shooting in Las Vegas.
    1. Donate to the tarp and tent project here at La Finquita
    2. Donate to Mercy Corps
    3. Donate to Doctors Without Borders
    4. Listen and donate to this: Lin-Manuel Miranda’s new song : https://www.newyorker.com/culture/listening-booth/lin-manuel-mirandas-proud-star-filled-tribute-song-for-a-puerto-rico-in-need
    5. https://hispanicfederation.org/donate/
    6. Share the places you have found that use the money you donate in the most effective ways.

 

Here are some recipes for this week:

Kale and Lentil Soup

(Marilyn’s invention from Sue)

3 T EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)

1 onion and 1 rib of celery (chopped and sauté for 4 minutes)

6-7 cups of water

2 cups chicken broth

1 ½ cups green lentils (rinsed and checked)

1 bay leaf

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

½ – 1 # kale (washed and sliced)

12 oz. Kielbasa (slice in 1” rounds)

16 oz. plum tomatoes

2 teaspoons red wine vinegar

Salt and pepper to taste

Sauté onion and celery for 4 minutes. Add water and chicken broth as well as lentils to the sauté mix. Add the bay leaf and red pepper flakes and bring to a boil. Decrease heat to a simmer for 30 minutes. Then add the Kale, kielbasa sausage, tomatoes and red wine vinegar. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cook 15 minutes more and serve. Great the next day.

 

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE AND GINGER SHRIMP
24 large shrimp in shell (about 1 lb), peeled, leaving tail and first segment of shell intact, and deveined
1 tablespoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2/3 cup chopped shallot
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 3/4 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (5 cups)
4 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs
Toss shrimp with ginger in a bowl and marinate, chilled, 30 minutes (do not marinate any longer or enzymes from ginger will begin to cook shrimp).

Make soup while shrimp marinate:
Cook shallot, garlic, and anise in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until shallot is softened, about 5 minutes. Add squash, stock, and water and simmer, uncovered, until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove star anise.

Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) until very smooth, about 1 minute per batch, then transfer to cleaned pan and keep warm, covered.

Sprinkle marinated shrimp with salt. Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté shrimp in 2 batches, stirring, until just cooked through, about 3 minutes per batch, transferring to paper towels.

Bring soup to a simmer and season with salt and pepper. Divide among 8 shallow soup bowls and mound 3 shrimp in each bowl.

Cooks’ note:
. Soup (without shrimp) can be made 3 days ahead and chilled, covered. If making soup ahead, begin marinating shrimp about 40 minutes before serving.

Gourmet
December 2002

 

DELICATA SQUASH WITH ROSEMARY, SAGE, AND CIDER GLAZE
This is my favorite way to cook winter squash. You peel, and slice it, then cook it in a skillet with cider and
winter herbs. When most of the liquid boils away, the cider forms a tart-sweet glaze around the now-tender squash.

Delicata is a wonderfully firm-textured squash that’s not too sweet and almost like a potato. Other varieties like
acorn, turban, or kabocha will make good substitutes, but they may not hold their shape quite as well through the
braising.

2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm
winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice
1 cup water
2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

1. Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.

2. Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook,
stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.

3. Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender,
20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

 

Roasted Winter Roots with Whole Garlic Heads
From The San Francisco Chronicle Cookbook\

All vegetables may be cooked in the oven at the same time. The heads
of garlic, roasted alongside the vegetables, become a self-contained
spread that is delicious on country-style bread. Be sure to allow one
garlic head for each person.

4 carrots, about ½ pound total
2 parsnips, about ½ pound total
2 turnips, about 1 pound total
1 rutabaga, about 1 pound
2 yellow onions, about ¾ pound total
3 russet potatoes, about 1 ¾ pounds total
4 heads of garlic, about ½ pound total
1/3 C olive oil
1 ½ tsps salt
1Tbles freshly ground pepper
4 fresh thyme sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh rosemary sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh sage sprigs, or 1 tsp dried

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Peel the carrots, parsnips, turnips and rutabaga. Cut the
carrots into 2 inch lengths. Halve the parsnips crosswise, separating
the tapering root end from the thick upper portion. Cut the upper
portion lengthwise into 2 pieces. Quarter the turnips and rutabaga.
Peel the onions but do not cut off the root ends. Quarter the onions
lengthwise.
Scrub the potatoes and cut them lengthwise into quarters, then
in half. Cut off the upper quarter of the garlic heads, leaving the
heads intact, skin and all.
Combine half of the olive oil, the salt, pepper, thyme,
rosemary and sage in a large bowl. Add all of the vegetables,
including the garlic. Stir them until they are well coated with the
seasoned oil.
Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on 2 baking sheets.
Roast for 30 minutes. Stir the vegetables and baste with some of the
remaining olive oil. Continue roasting, stirring once or twice and
basting with olive oil, for 30 to 45 minutes longer, or until all the
vegetables are tender and are easily pierced with a fork. Remove from
the oven and transfer to a platter.
Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 4
 

 

 

 

 

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Week #26 2017

Week #26

  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio
  • Kale
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Hot peppers
  • Sweet peppers
  • Stuffing peppers
  • Winter squash
  • Parsley or basil
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Grapes or apples.
  • Eggplant

We were surprised last week to find do many vegetables inspired by the rain. We had a few beans, cucumbers and zucchini and more tomatoes than we expected.  As I am writing this note I am somewhat guessing what we will find. Light rain and heat of last week may have ripened a few vegetables unexpectedly, thus what I write at 0530 may not be what you find in your harvest basket at 1330.

Still no broccoli! Odd as this may seem our plants are large and quite beautiful but on survey Friday I did not see one head. Both Broccoli and cauliflower are out there and should be coming in the next weeks. We have 3 more harvests after this week. We will surely have some of those fall favorites by then. The Brussels sprouts will get topped today, hopefully forcing some of them to form little heads on their stocks. If the tops of the plants look good we will given them to you as a special treat, like a tender collard green.

We did it! Your calls and emails and outrage over the attempts to end Obamacare worked. Once again we defeated them, but they are distracting us! The congress failed to approve the health center funding cliff and our community clinics funding is threatened. If they do not fix the cliff we may loose funding to care for over 9 million people. Call your representatives today!!

Earthquake Relief

We have good friends who live part time in Oaxaca and part time in Portland. Their home was not damaged in the earthquake and the >500 aftershocks, but they are traveling to southern Mexico in three weeks. They will be taking a truck full of supplies for victims of the earthquakes. This is where you come in! We are collecting new or old tents and tarps for them to take. Please consider donating one of these items. So often we send money not knowing if it will reach the people we want to help. This is a direct way to contribute to people most in need. Bring your items and leave them in the designated box in the barn.

Harvest Party

If you have not put this event on your calendar this is your opportunity! Sunday October 15 from 2-6 p.m. Be there or be square. See and print out the attached flyer and post on your fridge. You are welcome to bring family and friends and show off your farm. We plan to have cider pressing, pepper roasting, music , traditional Mexican dancing and more. I am busy making ceramic mugs and wreaths and bird feeders for sale.

Beef for Sale

Juvencio is preparing for his annual ground beef sale. We will be selling ground beef for $6/#. We would love you to buy in quantities of 10# or more.  Please send us an email with the quantity you want and your cell phone number and we will add you to the list. We expect to have the beef by the end of the month. It is beef raised on pasture and without antibiotics or hormones ever.

Thanksgiving Harvest

It is time to sign up for our Thanksgiving harvest November 19 and 20th. The additional veggies cost $40 and will include all sorts of goodies for your Thanksgiving table. We ask that you sign up and pre-pay for this vegetable extravaganza. We have spinach, lettuce and escarole planted and growing to make a delicious salad. We have large squash and pie pumpkins, leeks, shallots, onions and more. Trust us, by end of November you will miss your veggies!

CSA 2018 Season

Yes, it is time to let us know your intentions for 2018. This year is rapidly coming to an end. We are looking to the future, 2018 has to be a better year! We have already started planting for 2018, we have overwintering broccoli and cauliflower planted. We have shallots stored and we look forward to getting 5-6 greenhouses packed with delicious spring veggies for you and your family. Tell your friends and get signed up early for 2018.

Have a super week.

RADICCHIO SALAD WITH SPANISH BLUE CHEESE AND PEPPERED ALMONDS
1 head butter lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
1 head radicchio, torn into bite-size pieces
8 ounces blue cheese (preferably Cabrales), crumbled
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
5 tablespoons almond oil or olive oil
Peppered Almonds
Combine lettuce, radicchio and cheese in large bowl. Pour vinegar into small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Toss lettuce mixture with vinaigrette. Season salad with salt and pepper. Sprinkle Peppered Almonds over and serve immediately.

Bon Appétit
March 2000

Toro Bravo’s Radicchio Salad with Manchego Vinaigrette

By Genius Recipes

Austere as this salad may seem, it’s got 2 secret tricks that will make you better at making salads, during the holidays and forever after. 1. You infuse the vinegar with chopped red onion for an hour, then quietly remove it. The vinegar is left with a richer, more complex flavor, without the oppressive oniony kickback. 2. You toss the dressed leaves with a dusting of finely grated Manchego to help the coating stick. Adapted slightly from Toro Bravo: Stories. Recipes. No Bull. (McSweeney’s Insatiables, 2013).

Serves 4 to 8

  • 2 to 3 heads radicchio
  • 1/4 cup good-quality balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup good-quality sherry vinegar
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 3/4 cups olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cup Manchego, finely grated and divided
  • Salt, to taste
  1. Remove the cores from the radicchio and discard. Chop into 1-inch pieces. Take 1 gallon of water in a large bowl and add enough ice to make the water icy cold. Once cold, strain out the ice and add the radicchio to the water. Let it sit for 15 minutes to remove some of its bitterness, strain and then spin in a salad spinner until dry. Fluff the dried radicchio. (Note: If you don’t strain the ice out before adding the radicchio you’ll be pulling out ice pieces for half an hour so that you don’t have wet radicchio.)
  2. In a large bowl, add the balsamic vinegar, sherry vinegar, and chopped red onion. Break the onion up into pieces so that all of that oniony flavor gets into the vinegar. (Note: If you want to quick pickle and eat the onions themselves, Food52er hardlikearmour suggests adding the honey now too.) Let it sit for 1 hour and then strain out the onions.
  3. Add the honey and olive oil to the strained vinegars and whisk.
  4. Using your hands, toss the radicchio with the dressing until evenly coated. Add 1 cup of finely grated Manchego, salt, and toss again.
  5. To serve, top the salad in a serving bowl with the remaining 1/2 cup grated Manchego or distribute salad and Manchego among 4 to 8 bowls or plates.

 

 

 

 

Lentil and Sausage Soup with Kale

By Merrill Stubbs

Serves 6

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for browning the sausages
  • 1 tablespoon bacon fat (or add another tablespoon of olive oil)
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 3/4 cups chopped celery
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • Salt
  • 1 1/2 cup french green lentils, rinsed
  • 28 ounces canned chopped tomatoes (I use tetra-pack)
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • 4 chicken sausages (or substitute another kind of sausage)
  • 1 1/2 cup chopped kale
  1. Heat the olive oil and bacon fat over medium heat in a large, heavy pot and add the carrots, celery, onion and garlic. Add a big pinch of salt. Cook until softened, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the lentils, tomatoes and 4 cups water. Add the thyme and rosemary and a couple more pinches of salt. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat to a simmer. Cook until the lentils are tender, 15 to 20 minutes, adding more water if necessary to cover the vegetables.
  3. Meanwhile brown the sausages in about a teaspoon of olive oil in a small pan and then slice them into quarter moons.
  4. When the lentils are just tender, taste the soup and add more salt if necessary. Add the kale and cook for about 3 minutes, until the kale is tender but still green. Stir in the sausage, make sure everything is heated through, and serve.

Chickpea Stew with acorn squash, kale and toasted pecans

By reahpeah

A quick vegetarian supper. I saved time by microwaving the squash but would be even better roasted. It’s surprisingly tasty!

Serves 4-6

  • 1 Acorn Squash, cooked
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • dash mustard seeds, turmeric, cinnamon, chili flakes, madras curry powder
  • 1 cup kale, chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2 cups stock
  • 2 cups chickpea rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon toasted almond oil (or toasted sesame oil)
  • 2-3 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 2-3 tablespoons pecan halves, toasted
  1. Cook squash in microwave until soft (7-10 minutes). In a large pot on medium heat, add onions and spices, and cook until lightly browned. Add garlic.
  2. Add squash, kale and stock. Stew for 10-15 minutes covered. Puree with a hand immersion blender. Turn down to low and add chickpeas. Cook another 10-15 minutes until chickpeas are soften and kitchen smells good. Serve with plain yogurt and toasted pecans.

 

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Week #25

  • • Lettuce
    • Parsley or thyme or basil
    • Napa cabbage (sorry it didn’t show up last week, it was not ready when we went out to harvest)
    • radishes or beets (choose one or the other)
    • Kale or chard
    • Sweet peppers (red and green and yellow, enjoy them while you can)
    • tomatoes (very slow ripening due to the dramatic change in the weather)
    • winter squash (let the squash sit on the counter for a few weeks to months it will get sweeter and more delicious as it ages)
    • apples (good for eating and for sauce)
    • hot peppers
    • onions
    • garlic

The shift in the weather has really changed the landscape at the farm. The heat loving crops like tomatoes and eggplant, cucumbers and zucchini resent the cool nights that dip into the low 40s. They have all but stopped production and are setting flowers that are not likely to produce fruit. The rain was super for the fall crops like lettuce, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage, but they still seem to be a few weeks off. There was a horrible new pest we have not seen outside the greenhouse that was causing severe damage to many of our leafy crops that seems to have sent back into hiding with the rain. There are so many things we can not control, weather being one.

Juvencio went into action with the change in weather and pulled out the last of the melons. They have been so good this year. We now realize that many of you have purchased our melons but we did not give guidance on how to tell if they are ripe and sweet to eat. We are trying to give you the very best, but melons are a bit tricky and need to be very ripe, but not overripe to have them be superb. Here are some tips I found when searching on the internet, we use the smell as our guide and keeping them at room temperature for some time is helpful.

If picking a ripe melon feels like a completely daunting task, I can assure you that you’re not alone. Sometimes this choice feels more like a leap of faith, where you cross your fingers and hope for the best.
But there are ways to discover the sweetest, ripest, juiciest melons, and to pluck them from the heap.
Picking a good melon comes with challenges. It’s not like selecting berries where you can see green hints of unripeness. And it’s certainly not as easy as selecting a good peach or nectarine, where you can feel for juiciness, and smell the scent of perfect ripeness.
From now on, use these 5 tips to pick a ripe melon every time!
1. Inspect the melon for defects.
Your first order of business should be to inspect what the melon looks like. Does it have any bruising, soft spots or cracks? Choose a melon that’s not damaged on the outside. It should be free of bruises, soft spots, moldy patches and cracks.
2. Check the skin color.
When buying watermelon and honeydew, choose a melon with a dull looking appearance. A shiny outside is an indicator of an underripe melon. Also, honeydews should be pale yellow to light lemon in color, not overly green.
With melons such as cantaloupe and muskmelons, the rind underneath the net-like texture should be golden or orange in color. Avoid melons with an underlying green or white color.
→ Related: The Best Way to Pick a Watermelon
3. Size does matter.
Pick up a few melons and see how they feel. Choose a melon that’s heavy for its size.
4. Tap, tap, tap!
Have you ever tried the tapping test when buying a watermelon? It’s quite simple. Just tap the melon with the palm of your hand. If you hear a hollow sound, it’s passed the first test.
5. Don’t forget the smell test.
This works best with melons like cantaloupes and honeydew. Push your fingers on the round section where the vine was attached. It should be slightly soft and should smell fresh and fragrant with a hint of sweetness.

I have been busy filling in the greenhouses and space outside with fall and winter crops. I planted more lettuce, radicchio, escarole, kale, cilantro and beets in place of the melons and carrots. I will have more plants to go and more space to fill as we shift into the winter. The col crops (broccoli etc.) are looking good but seem like they are 1-3 weeks from being ready to harvest. We debute some radishes and beets today, again plagued by poor germination during the super hot spells there is not enough for everyone to enjoy it all, you will have to choose your favorite.

We have 4 more weeks of harvest remaining in the regular season. It is hard to believe the 2017 season is coming to an end. In some ways we are happy to see it go. It has been the hardest year of farming in our recent memory. So many difficulties with weather, germination, pests we questioned our knowledge and experience. The summer months were good, reminding us that, “yes we do know how to grow vegetables for 100 families”. The fall will be fairly good, but that remains to be seen. Our favorite Romanesco broccoli was a bust, it did not form heads at all. Half of the brussels sprouts are not going to produce and our amazing winter squash that looked so promising was stunted by the cucumber beetles. Alas, we are not sad to see 2017 end. The political storm and world weather tragedies as well as the constant threat of war make our struggles pale in comparison.

Message to self: “Enjoy what we have, cherish your loved ones, welcome those you don’t know and those who need a hand to join you at your table.”

Last but not least, remember the harvest festival on October 15 from 2-6. This is our last all farm event for the season and should be an enjoyable afternoon. It is an opportunity to for you to show your farm off to friends and neighbors, feel free to bring them along.

Here are some recipes to try:

Kale Salad With Apples and Cheddar Recipe – NYT Cooking
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013732-kale-salad-with-apples-and-cheddar?action=click&module=Collection%20Page%20Recipe%20Card&reg… 1/1
INGREDIENTS
4 cups very finely chopped or
slivered curly kale or Russian kale
(about 6 ounces on the stem, or half
of a 3/4-pound bunch, stemmed and
washed in two rinses of water)
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped
toasted almonds
1 apple, sweet, like a Fuji, or a sweettart,
like a Gala, Braeburn or Pink
Lady, cored and cut in 1/4-inch dice
1 ounce sharp Cheddar cheese, cut
in 1/4-inch dice
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Salt to taste
1 very small garlic clove, puréed
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly grated
Parmesan
PREPARATION
Tip
Advance preparation: This salad benefits from tossing with the
dressing about 15 minutes before you serve it. The kale will soften in
the dressing.
By Martha Rose Shulman YIELD Serves four to six TIME 5 minutes
Kale Salad With Apples and Cheddar
Step 1
Combine the kale, almonds, apple and Cheddar in a large bowl.
Step 2
Whisk together the lemon juice, salt, garlic and olive oil. Add to the
salad, and toss well. Sprinkle the Parmesan over the top, and serve.

Crisp Kale Chips With Chile and Lime
Step 1
Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Make sure the kale is dry; if it is not, it
will steam rather than crisp in the oven.
Step 2
In a large bowl, toss kale pieces with olive oil and kosher salt; you may
need to do this in 2 batches. Massage the oil onto each kale piece until
the oil is evenly distributed and the kale glistens. Spread the kale out
on 2 17-by-12-inch jellyroll pans (or do this in batches). Bake the kale
chips until the leaves look crisp and crumble, about 12-16 minutes. If
they are not ready, bake for another 2 to 4 minutes.
Step 3
Remove from the oven and cool to room temperature. Sprinkle with
the lime zest, sea salt and chile powder to taste

Braised Kale
Step 1
Bring a large pot of generously salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, set
aside a large bowl of ice water. Add kale to boiling water, return to a
boil, and after 1 minute transfer to ice bath. Drain well, and set aside.
Step 2
In a large sauté pan, heat oil over low heat and sauté onion, carrot and
celery until just softened. Add sherry vinegar and cook until reduced
by two-thirds. Add kale and stir to coat, then add chicken broth,
honey, 2 teaspoons salt and the pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook,
partly covered, until kale is tender, 60 to 80 minutes.
Step 3
Transfer kale leaves to a warm bowl, leaving onion, carrot and celery
in broth. Strain broth, discarding solids. If there is more than * cup, it
may be boiled in a small saucepan until reduced. Adjust salt and
pepper as needed, and pour over kale. Serve immediately, or cover and
refrigerate for up to 24 hours; gently reheat before serving.

Curried Winter Squash Soup
Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

Serves 6-8

3 T unsalted butter
1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed
4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes
12 whole curry leaves (optional)
½ teaspoon ground allspice
¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
2 teaspoons curry powder
salt
freshly ground pepper
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

1. melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.
2. Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture. Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg. Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes. Let cool slightly.
3. Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.
4. Transfer the soup back to the pot. Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste. Return the soup to a simmer to heat through. Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

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Week #24 2017

Week #24
• Lettuce
• Napa cabbage
• Thyme or parsley
• Kale
• Winter squash
• Zucchini
• Cucumbers
• Tomatoes
• Cherry tomatoes
• Sweet peppers
• Hot peppers
• Onion
• Garlic
• Green beans
• Eggplant
• plums
The canning party was great success! It has never run so smoothly and we have never finished so early! I think it was thanks to amazing organization and direction from Mary Kay, Juvencio’s masterful assistance in every aspect and good planning. We had 24 participant families and we made 13 recipes and everyone went home with over 16 jars of goodies. We made plum cardamom jam, habanero (ghost too) carrot hot sauce, chipotle salsa, BBQ sauce, two chutneys, pickled peppers and much more. Many of us left with the canning bug and want to make more! Many first time canners commented on how much easier it was than they thought and want to try to make some of the recipes for themselves at home.
We are bracing for the rains. They are much needed as dust, ash and dead grass seem to dominate the landscape. Rain will help the fall crops like broccoli, cabbage and radicchio but will bring the end of tomatoes and squash. The fall shift is in the air as we wind down the last 6 weeks of the 2017 season. It is time to make salad, stews and soups. We are pulling out beds in the greenhouses and filling them with spinach, beets, radishes and other fall/winter crops.
We still need your help. There are 12 harvests left and we have few if any helpers signed up to lend a hand. Please do sign up and show up to help us Sunday or Wednesday mornings at 0700. The harvests take 3-5 hours depending on the number of helpers and the quantity of produce to harvest.
Our annual harvest festival is scheduled for October 15th and it promises to be a grand event. The party starts after our harvest that day. Please mark your calendars and bring your family to our October final event of the 2017 season. There will be a Thanksgiving harvest on November 19th/20th full of staples for your thanksgiving feast. I will have wreaths, ceramics, and other goodies for sale at both events. Time to place orders if you want something in particular. Otherwise take a look in the studio!
EGGPLANT, ZUCCHINI, RED PEPPER, AND PARMESAN TORTE
2 large onions (about 1 pound)
1 garlic clove
about 1/2 cup olive oil
a 26- to 32-ounce container chopped tomatoes
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
2 large eggplants (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
4 large zucchini (about 1 3/4 pounds total)
4 large red bell peppers
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup milk
1 cup heavy cream
3 large eggs
6 ounces freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (about 2 cups)
Halve onions through root end and thinly slice. Finely chop garlic. In a large heavy skillet cook onions with salt to taste in 2 tablespoons oil, covered, over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook mixture, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until any liquid onions give off is evaporated. Add tomatoes with juice, sage, and thyme and simmer, stirring occasionally, until excess liquid is evaporated and mixture is very thick. Season mixture with salt and pepper and cool. Preheat oven to 450°F. Brush at least 2 shallow baking pans with some remaining oil.
Cut eggplants crosswise into 1/3-inch-thick rounds and arrange in one layer in baking pans. Brush eggplant slices with some remaining oil and roast in upper and lower thirds of oven, switching position of pans halfway through roasting time, until tender and golden, about 20 minutes. Cool eggplant 5 minutes and transfer with a slotted spatula to paper towels to drain.
Cut zucchini lengthwise into 1/3-inch-thick slices and roast in same manner until tender and pale golden, about 25 minutes. Cool zucchini 5 minutes and transfer to paper towels to drain.
Quarter bell peppers lengthwise and discard stems, seeds, and ribs. Arrange peppers, skin sides up, in oiled baking pans and brush with some remaining oil. Roast peppers in same manner until tender and lightly browned, about 20 minutes. Cool peppers 5 minutes and transfer to paper towels to drain.
In a 1 1/2- to 2-quart heavy saucepan melt butter over moderately low heat and whisk in flour. Cook roux, whisking, 3 minutes and whisk in milk and cream. Bring mixture to a boil, whisking, and simmer, whisking occasionally, 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat and cool sauce 5 minutes. Whisk in eggs, two thirds Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt and pepper to taste.
Preheat oven to 400°F. and lightly oil a 14- x 10- x 2 1/2-inch or other 3 1/2-quart shallow baking dish. In baking dish arrange half of eggplant, overlapping slices to form an even layer, and season with salt and pepper. Top eggplant with half of tomato mixture, spreading evenly, and pour about one third Parmigiano-Reggiano custard over it. Nestle half of zucchini in custard and season with salt and pepper. Top zucchini with half of peppers. Repeat layering, reserving half of remaining custard for topping. Pour reserved custard over final layer of peppers and sprinkle with remaining grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.
Bake torte in middle of oven until custard is puffed and golden brown, about 35 minutes. Let torte stand 10 minutes before serving.

ASIAN NOODLE, MUSHROOM, AND CABBAGE SALAD
12 large dried shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon peanut oil
3 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
14 green onions; 12 halved lengthwise and cut on diagonal into 2-inch lengths, 2 chopped
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 1-pound package fresh thin Chinese egg noodles or one 12-ounce package dried Chinese egg noodles
1/3 cup oriental sesame oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
3 hard-boiled eggs; 2 thinly sliced, 1 chopped for garnish
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Place mushrooms in medium bowl; add enough boiling water to cover. Let stand until mushrooms soften, about 45 minutes. Drain mushrooms. Cut off stems and discard; thinly slice caps.
Heat peanut oil in heavy large wok or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add cabbage, ginger, garlic, and mushrooms. Stir-fry until cabbage wilts, about 2 minutes. Add 2-inch green onion pieces; toss until green tops begin to wilt, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat. Mix in 1 tablespoon soy sauce.
Cook noodles in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite. Drain well; place in large bowl. Whisk sesame oil, next 3 ingredients, and 2 tablespoons soy sauce in small bowl. Add to noodles. Add sliced eggs, 3/4 cup cilantro, and cabbage mixture; toss to blend well. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 1 day ahead) Cover and chill, tossing occasionally.
Sprinkle salad with 2 chopped green onions, chopped egg, and remaining 1/4 cup cilantro and serve.
Bon Appétit
July 2002
NAPA CABBAGE SALAD
Printed from COOKS.COM

Napa cabbage
Green onions
Butter
Slivered almonds
Sesame seeds
Ramen noodles
Oil
Sugar
Vinegar
Soy sauce
Break up 1 head Napa cabbage.
Saute 1/2 cup butter, 1/2 cup slivered almonds, 1/2 cup sesame seed, 2 packages Ramen noodles (crushed) and 10 green onions. Combine with cabbage.
DRESSING:
1 c. oil
1 c. sugar
1/2 c. vinegar
2 tbsp. soy sauce
Toss and serve.

Chicken Hash with Butternut Squash and Kale

Here’s a new way to serve up nutritious veggies with protein-packed chicken. It’s tender, flavorful and simple to make. Basically a perfect meal!
This dish is great for meal prep, as it holds up well for several days in the fridge and can be easily packed in Tupperware to eat on-the-go. Enjoy!
Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com
Servings: 6
Here’s what you need
• 1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into large pieces
• 1 bunch curly kale, stemmed and roughly chopped
• 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into 2” pieces
• sea salt and black pepper
• 1 Tablespoon olive oil
• 1 red onion, sliced
• 1 Tablespoon fresh sage, minced
• ½ cup chicken broth
• ¼ teaspoon liquid stevia
• 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
Instructions
1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the butternut squash pieces and blanch for 3 minutes, until almost cooked through.
2. Remove from heat and stir in the chopped kale. Let stand, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Drain the pot and set the veggies aside.
3. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper. Return the emptied pot to medium-high heat and sauté the chicken with the olive oil, until browned on all sides.
4. Add the onions and sauté for 2 minutes. Mix in the butternut squash and kale mixture and sage. Sauté for another 2 minutes.
5. In a small bowl combine the broth, stevia and Dijon. Pour over the hash and simmer until the liquid is reduced. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Enjoy!
Nutritional Analysis
217 calories, 2g fat, 12g carbohydrate, 3g sugar, 208mg sodium, 2g fiber, and 24g protein.

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