Week #16

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  • Parsley or cilantro
  • Gravenstein apples
  • Basil (the whole plant – keep the roots on and stick then in a jar of water on your counter for use all week)
  • Kale
  • Broccoli
  • Cucumbers
  • Zucchini
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions (huge Ailsa Craig – use fresh, not for storage)
  • Garlic
  • Fresh beans – wax and green!
  • Hot peppers
  • Green peppers
  • Kohlrabi – enjoy this giant
  • Tomatillos
  • Cabbage

This was a very productive week. We harvested onions and cleared flower beds and managed to plant all the cleared beds. We put in more cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower for fall. We reseeded the beets and carrots (this is probably the third time we have tried in 4 weeks (so frustrating and so costly!). I have the sprouting broccoli and overwintering cauliflower seeded and almost ready to transplant. We put in an extra 70 summer squash plants “just in case”. I am debating the extra cucumbers that I have wanted to put in. There is no space, and honestly can you eat more cucumbers? But I have them as reserve and we’ll see if I feel the need in 1-2 more weeks.

We hope to start work on the famous new greenhouse but that project remains in the wings. There is so much to weed, seed and harvest it is almost impossible to think about starting another project. We will need space for the fall crops like spinach and lettuce and radicchio and don’t forget daikon radish! We will need those greenhouses up and running.

We started making cheese again. The shiny new pasteurizer works great, now the farmer needs to find time to milk and prep the cheese. Our pigs will go to the butcher soon so that will free up some time for Juvencio as they need daily tending, they are always hungry.

There are tons of blackberries so you can pick some when you come out to the farm. They are in their full glory right now. We planted Padron peppers again this year and have them for $3/box. They make a great appetizer for those summer meals, just follow the directions below for the best peppers around.

Blistered Padrón Peppers

BON APPÉTIT MARCH 2013 TRASIERRA, SEVILLE, SPAIN

Yield

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound Padrón or shishito peppers
  • Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)

Preparation

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add half of the peppers; cook, tossing occasionally, until skins are blistered and flesh is softened, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a bowl, sprinkle with salt, and toss to coat. Repeat with remaining peppers, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and more salt.

 

Don’t forget to sign up to help with the harvest. We have passed the half way mark, there are 13 weeks left of the regular season, 27 harvests to go, don’t miss your opportunity to share the work. Growing vegetables is hard work and the harvest is the best part. You get to dirty your hands and meet new people. We start at 7 and go until the harvest is done, usually 4 hours at this time of year.

 

Up coming events include:

  • Helvetia Culture Fest – August 14 1-5 (postcard info in the barn on the sign-in table)
  • Harvest Festival – October 9 (2-6 p.m.) save the date and invite your friends!

 

 

Cucumber Salsa Salad

By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

This salad, which resembles gazpacho, is a lovely, light way to begin a Mexican meal. Serve it atop lettuce leaves as a salad, or serve over rice. Alternately, use it as a sauce with fish, chicken or fajitas.

1 long European cucumber, very finely diced

Salt to taste

1 small red onion, finely minced

5 medium-size ripe tomatoes, finely chopped

2 jalapeño or serrano peppers, seeded if desired and finely chopped

1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped cilantro (to taste), plus several sprigs for garnish

1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

3 tablespoons fresh lime juice

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Leaf lettuce or Boston lettuce for serving (optional)

1 avocado, sliced, for garnish

  1. Place the finely diced cucumber in a colander, and sprinkle with salt. Toss and allow to sit for 15 minutes. Rinse the cucumber thoroughly with cold water, and drain again on paper towels.
  2. Meanwhile, place the onion in a bowl and cover with cold water. Let sit for five minutes, then drain, rinse with cold water and drain on paper towels.
  3. Combine the tomatoes, chiles, cilantro, vinegar, lime juice and olive oil in a bowl. Add the cucumber and onion, and season to taste with salt. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  4. Serve the salad on lettuce leaves, garnished with slices of avocado and cilantro sprigs, or spoon over steamed rice.

Yield: Serves six.

Advance preparation: You can assemble the salad a few hours ahead, but don’t add the cilantro until close to serving time.

 

 

DILLED TUNA-CUCUMBER SALAD
1 6 1/8-ounce can water-packed white tuna, drained
1/2 cucumber, peeled, seeded, diced
2 small green onions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons nonfat yogurt
2 tablespoons reduced-calorie mayonnaise
1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Combine all ingredients in small bowl. Mix well. Season generously with pepper. Serve salad chilled.

 

 

Basil Pesto

Basil leaves (removed from tough stems, washed and dried gently)

Gallic cloves minced

Pine nuts

Olive oil

Parmesan cheese

 

This recipe doesn’t have exact measures but I usually start with the cheese in the food processor and grind it fine.  Then I remove it and all basil leaves and garlic to the bowl.  Grind fine then add 1-4 tablespoons of pine nuts and then while motor is running add a stream of olive oil and the parmesan.  I like the consistency to be pasty not too dry.  I then add this to 1 pound of cooked pasta al dente.  Mix well and serve with additional cheese on top.

 

GREEN MOLE WITH PORK
2 pounds boneless center cut pork loin in one piece, rolled and tied together with the ribs and backbone
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns, bruised
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
9 garlic cloves
8 whole cloves, or 1/4 teaspoon ground
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 jalapeño chiles, tops removed
6 large tomatillos, husks removed
1 small onion, cut into chunks
2 sprigs fresh thyme
2 sprigs fresh marjoram
1 cup (8 ounces) masa, either fresh or reconstituted by mixing 6 tablespoons masa harina to a smooth paste with 1 cup of water (see Tips, below)
1 medium bunch Italian parsley
Eight 6-inch sprigs fresh epazote or 1/4 cup dried, crumbled (see Tips, below)
3 large or 5 medium-size fresh hoja santa leaves or 6 dried leaves (see Tips, below)
2 cups cooked Great Northern or other white beans
Choose a deep saucepan or Dutch oven large enough to hold the meat comfortably. Place the tied pork loin and bones in it along with the peppercorns, salt, and 4 of the garlic cloves. Add enough cold water to cover by 1 inch (at least 7 cups). Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, partly covered, for 1 hour, or until a meat thermometer inserted into the center reads 120° F. (Do not worry about the low temperature. The meat will cook more thoroughly in reheating.) Remove the meat and bones from the cooking stock and set aside. Strain the stock; you should have about 6 cups.

Grind the cloves and cumin together in an electric coffee or spice grinder, or with a mortar and pestle. Place the ground spices in a blender with the chiles, tomatillos, onion, thyme, marjoram, the remaining 5 garlic cloves, and 1/2 cup of the strained stock. Process until smoothly puréed (about 2 minutes on high).

Return the remaining strained stock to the pan; bring back to a boil, and adjust the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Add the puréed mixture to the hot stock and cook, uncovered, for 3 minutes.

Thin the masa by mixing with 1 cup water. Whisk the thinned masa into the stock mixture; whisking constantly, let the sauce return to the simmer.

Cook, uncovered, over low heat for 10 minutes, whisking occasionally. If lumps form, pass the mixture through a medium-mesh sieve (pushing with a spoon to force through the lumpy bits) and return to the heat. The mixture should thicken to the consistency of whipping cream; if necessary, increase the heat slightly to reduce and thicken it.

Untie the cooked pork and carve into serving pieces. Carve the bones into separate rib sections.

Place the parsely, epazote, and hoja santa in a blender or food processor. If using a blender, add a few tablespoons water to facilitate blending. Process to a smooth purée.

Add the cooked beans to the masa-thickened sauce and let return to a simmer. Return the carved meat and bones to the pot along with the puréed herbs. Taste and add more salt if desired. Cook until just heated through, 4 to 5 minutes. Give each person a piece or two of rib bone along with the meat and sauce. Serve immediately.

Chef Zarela Martinez shares her tips with Epicurious:
• This recipe, which can also be served over chicken or fish, is an example of the sophisticated sauce-making techniques for which Oaxaca is famous. Herbs, spices, and aromatics are puréed and mixed with stock; the sauce is then reduced and thickened with masa, a ground corn dough that performs a similar function to the roux in French cooking. Freshly puréed herbs are mixed in at the last minute for a sprightly, green flavor.
• Masa is a dough made from dried corn that has been treated with an alkali substance such as slaked lime and water and then ground. Fresh masa can be found at some Mexican grocery stores and at tortilla factories. For this recipe, be sure to avoid the masa preparada para tamales, which is mixed with lard and flavorings. Masa harina (dehydrated powdered masa, available at many grocery stores), is mixed with water to produce masa. Masa comes in fine and course grinds; either can be used in this recipe. Regular corn meal cannot be substituted for masa.
• Hoja santa, also called hierba santa or root-beer plant, has a distinctive anise- and sassafraslike flavor that’s hard to duplicate. Epazote has a slightly bitter, pungent, somewhat medicinal flavor that mellows in cooking. Martinez recommends using these herbs fresh for authenticity; look in farmers’ markets or buy whole plants from www.itsaboutthyme.com. Both herbs are available dried from www.kitchenmarket.com.
• Either dried or canned beans can be used in this recipe. If using dried beans, boil them until they are almost cooked through but not falling apart.

 

 

ROASTED TOMATILLO SALSA

If you’re pressed for time, you may want to try a jarred
brand of tomatillo salsa instead of making it from scratch.
We can’t attest to the quality of all of them, but we do
love Rick Bayless’s, which has a fine, robust flavor. (Look
for it in specialty foods stores and in some supermarkets.)

Active time: 15 min   Start to finish: 15 min.

1 1/2 lb fresh tomatillos or 3 (11-oz) cans tomatillos
5 fresh serrano chiles
3 garlic cloves, unpeeled
1/2 cup fresh cilantro
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons coarse salt

 

Place tomatillos (after husking them), garlic and chiles in a pan in the broiler, 2 – 3 inches from broiler.  Broil until tomatillos soft (approximately 7 minutes.  Remove and peal garlic, destem the chiles and place all ingredients in blender.

Makes about 3 cups.

Gourmet
Kohlrabi Slaw

Salad:
1 1/4 lbs kohlrabi, peeled and coarsely shredded
2 lge carrots, peeled and coarsely shredded
1/2 sweet red pepper, seeded and diced
1/2 c. chopped scallions, including green

Dressing:
2 T oil, pref olive oil
2 T vinegar (I used white wine vinegar)
2 t or more fresh snipped dill
1 t sugar (I used 1/4 t)
1/2 t ea. cumin and mustard powder
1/4 t crumbled tarragon
1/4 t ea. salt and pepper
1/3 c plain yoghurt

Toss salad ingredients in a bowl. In a separate bowl, blend oil and vinegar, then blend in other ingredients. Pour over salad, toss, cover and refrigerate for about 2 hrs before serving.
Serves 6

 

 

GREEN CABBAGE STUFFED WITH VEGETABLES AND FRESH HERBS

Printed from COOKS.COM

1 c. chopped mushrooms
2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
1/2 c. diced red bell peppers
1/2 c. diced asparagus or broccoli
1/4 c. diced onions
6 tbsp. Pesto
Dash of freshly ground black pepper
1/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
1 c. chopped cooked red potatoes
1 c. cooked lima or fava beans
1/2 c. pine nuts
1/2 head or 10 green cabbage leaves, steamed 3 to 4 minutes
2 c. prepared tomato sauce
3/4 to 1 c. grated Mozzarella cheese (optional)

In a large saucepan, saute the mushrooms, parsley, peppers, asparagus, onions, Pesto, and pepper in the oil over medium heat for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and stir in the potatoes, beans, and pine nuts. Place 1 or 2 tablespoons of the mixture on each cabbage leaf where the thick stem is. Fold the right side of the leaf over it, then the left, and roll up.

Place the stuffed leaves in a greased baking dish and pour the tomato sauce over them. Top with the cheese, cover with aluminum foil, and bake in a preheated 375 degree oven for 30 to 40 minutes. Yield: 2 servings.

 

 

 

 

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Week #15

Week #15

  • Lettuce
  • Shiso or parsley or cilantro
  • Currants or apples or plums
  • Basil
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower or broccoli
  • Cucumbers
  • Zucchini
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Beans – still just trickling in
  • Hot peppers
  • Cabbage

We remain busy on the farm. Weeding was top priority this past week. Vincent lent a hand and many of the worst weeds have been beaten back. The thistle remains a problem in many spots, making harvesting less pleasurable as one gets a sticker in each finger. We hope to get those areas under control this week. We planted some fall crops where ever some crops have finished. We have fall cauliflower, cabbage and celery in, and will get the remainder of the broccoli planted later this week. I will seed the overwintering cauliflower later this week, this is the amazing spring cauliflower that you got a taste of during the first and second harvests.

We hope to start work on the new greenhouses (hoop houses –  I use these terms interchangeably but really a hoop house has no heat source and that is all we use.) There will be a lot of construction going on here at the farm over the next few months. We hope to put cover crop in one house and fill the other with winter crops. We will see how far we get with that plan.

Juve has two new calves this week. The first offspring of the Wagyu bull. They are long legged and black and really cute. There muscle is mottled with fat so instead of a ribbon of fat around the edge of a steak you have the fat inside the muscle, making the most tender beef. This is supposed to be some of the best beef ever. We will not have any for purchase until late fall 2017 or winter. Today we have decided to do a beef tasting of our current meat. It is delicious and nutritious as they are completely grass-fed with no grain finishing. We will also pull out the cider press and let people have a spin. We will be in the barn sampling from 2 – 3:30 or 4 whenever the samples run out. Juve has some beef still for sale.

I am deep in the flower harvest, drying for wreaths. I have fresh flowers every week that go to waste. Please consider ordering a bouquet ahead and I will make it for you or purchase one that I have made with care every week. Flowers brighten your house and are such a bargain, you deserve it. A gift of flowers is always appreciated, so open your eyes when you come in the barn and cooler and take home a bouquet today!

And another – super easy but would be great with your beef that’s coming!

 

Finquita Beef and Cabbage Sauté (from former member Kindle)

1 lbg Finquita ground beef 🙂

large white onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbsp olive oil

1 large head cabbage chopped

Herbamare herb seasoning salt (or other seasoning of choice)

Salt and pepper

 

Using a large saute pan, saute onion and garlic in olive oil, add ground beef, season with Herbamare, salt and pepper to taste. Cook completely.  Add cabbage and simmer until tender. Serve warm. My kids like this dish served over rice with soy sauce or sweet chili sauce. I love it as is!

 

Andalusian Cabbage Salad

1 small head savoy or green cabbage
2 Tbs salt
2-3 large garlic cloves,  crushed
2 Tbs lemon juice
6 Tbs olive oil

Shred or finely slice the cabbage and toss with the salt in a large
bowl.  Let set one hour.
Rinse the cabbage well by swishing it in fresh cold water,
draining,  and soaking in fresh water again;  the rinse thoroughly
until it is not too salty.  Place in a bowl and cover with fresh ice
water and let sit for 15 minutes;  then drain.  Toss with remaining
ingredients and serve.

 

INDIAN SPICED CAULIFLOWER AND POTATOES
1 (1 3/4-lb) head cauliflower, cut into 3/4-inch-wide florets
1 1/4 lb Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
5 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 teaspoons minced fresh jalapeño, including seeds
2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 cup water

Accompaniment: lemon wedges
Put oven rack in upper third of oven and place a shallow baking pan on rack. Preheat oven to 475°F.

Toss cauliflower and potatoes together in a bowl with 3 tablespoons oil, cumin seeds, and1/4 teaspoon salt. Spread in hot baking pan and roast, stirring occasionally, until cauliflower is tender and browned in spots and potatoes are just tender, about 20 minutes.

While vegetables are roasting, cook onion, garlic, jalapeño, and ginger in remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until very soft and beginning to turn golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Add ground cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes. Stir in water, scraping up any brown bits from bottom of skillet, then stir in roasted vegetables. Cook, covered, stirring occasionally, 5 minutes.

Short Term Cucumber-Onion Pickles

Local Flavors, Deborah Madison

 

These were great!  We had them last week, easy and they taste super.

 

2/3 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar

1/3 cup sugar

pinch of salt

2 shiny fresh red or white onions (I used the really small ones and  added as many as I wanted)

2 cups thinly sliced cucumbers, peeled only if the skins are tough (I used any and all, cut off the ends if bitter)

a few lovage leaves, fennel greens or dill sprigs

1 teaspoon mixed whole pepper corns

3 tablespoons olive oil

 

  1. Mix the vinegar, sugar and slat and set aside, stirring occasionally until the sugar dissolves.
  2. Thinly slice the onions into rounds, then toss them with the cucumbers, herb, and peppercorns in a non corrosive bowl.
  3. Add the oil to the vinegar, stir well, then pour over the vegetables. Toss well, then cover and refrigerate.  It’s best if the pickles can sit for a day before being used.
  4. For sweet pickles, keep for up to 5 days in refrigerator.

 

 

 

 

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Week #14

harvest #14

  • Tomatoes!!! First of the season, we pick them slightly under ripe so that they will last for you this week (they may not make it home as you’ll want to pop them in your mouth as you drive home)
  • Currants – slightly tart and bright red, these delicious berries make good jelly or an addition to a fruit salad or tart.
  • Lettuce
  • Sweet onion – these are fresh not cured so they are not meant to hang around for weeks, but rather be used this week
  • Potatoes – likely the last for some time, so enjoy
  • Cauliflower – she’s back! for each and that is it until the fall!
  • Cilantro
  • Basil – it’s time to make pesto
  • Kale or chard (gotta eat those greens)
  • Beans – mainly wax beans as we wait for the pole beans to take off
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage – some are huge, make salad, roast them or make kraut
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer squash, aka zucchini
  • Garlic
  • YOU PICK blackberries are on! Harvest them along the field fence next to green house #3 and 4

This cool weather is great for the farmers , not so great for the summer crops that are wondering where the heat is. The peppers are loaded with fruit, both hot and sweet green are  close within 1-2 weeks. The eggplant is finally growing past the pest that was demolishing the leaves. Juve is racing to keep the tomatoes tied up so that the fruit is off the ground. The winter squash has gone crazy, it has completely covered the area to the west of greenhouse #3 and #4. Oh, yeah, and that drizzly rain? Not enough for our crops but boy do those weeds love the sprinkles.

Juve continues to make compost, clearing the goat pen of 6 dump trucks of hey and manure, it will now cure for months and be applied to the beds for next season. We continue to plant in beds that are harvested, peas went out and fall broccoli will go in. Brussels sprouts are finally all planted. I started and then ran out of space and moved on to other crops, like the never ending weekly planting of lettuce. You will all be happy to know that the pumpkins also made it into the ground as well as watermelon. All the fall brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage) are ready  to go in, but the onions are taking their sweet time. They look to have at least 3 more weeks before their tops fall and give the sign they are ready to be pulled to store. The onion beds will be prepped when vacant for the brassicas.

We will begin work on repairing greenhouse #3 and assemble greenhouse #5 and make space for #6. With all this new space we may have to switch to farming the backside of the calendar (winter farming here we come). We are considering it, so let us know to get on the wait list. Right now you may not think you will miss veggies, but come November. . .

Broccoli Sausage Pasta submitted by E. Kinney:

1 lb turkey Italian sausage
1 lb broccoli
1 box shaped pasta
1 onions much garlic as you can stand
Toasted Pine nuts
Parmesan Cheese
Chicken Stock
Red Pepper flakes

Sauté onion and garlic in pan until softened. Add
sausage and sauté until browned. At the same time,
blanche the broccoli in boiling water and drain and
cook pasta in boiling water until Al dente. Once
Broccoli is done add it to the sausage mixture along
with crushed red pepper flakes to taste. Add small
amount of chicken or vegetable stock to moisten the
“sauce”.
Place a good amount of pasta on plate, add shaved
parmesan, add “sauce”. Add more parmesan and toasted
pine nuts.

Mustard butter pasta with broccoli from The Tassajara Recipe Book.

5/8 cup butter, softened (or part olive oil)
4 Tblsp Dijon mustard
2 cloves garlic
2 Tblsp parsley, well minced
2 Tblsp chives, finely sliced or green onion, minced Salt and Pepper
1 Tblsp oil
2 cups broccoli, cut into small flowerets (or cauliflower or romanseco!)
3/4 pound pasta

Blend butter and mustard. Set aside. Slice garlic and pound it with a mortar with a healthy pinch of salt. When the garlic is pulpy add the parley and chives (or onions) and pound a bit more to release the flavors. Blend this mixture into the mustard mixture with a few twists of black pepper.

Bring a large amount of water to a boil with the tablespoon of oil and a spoonful of salt. Add the pasta to the boiling water. If you are using fresh pasta, add the broccoli at the same time. If using dried pasta, add the broccoli for the last couple minutes of cooking. As soon as the pasta and broccoli are done, drain and put them in a 12″ skillet allowing a bit of the cooking water to dribble in. Add the mustard mixture and, over moderate heat, toss the mixture until everything is evenly coated. Keep the heat low enough that the butter doesn’t bubble or fry as that would change the flavor. Adjust salt and pepper to your taste and serve.

Thai-Style Cabbage Salad

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon peanut oil
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Thai fish sauce
  • 1 green cabbage, finely shredded
  • 5-6 leaves kale
  • 1 small red onion, sliced extremely thinly
  • 3 peeled and grated carrots
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • Honey-roasted peanuts

Instructions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the lemon juice, oil, sugar and fish sauce until the sugar is dissolved. Add the cabbage, kale, onion, carrot, mint and cilantro and toss well. The dressing will coat the ingredients very lightly; there will not be a pool of dressing in the bottom of the bowl. Throw in a handful or two of peanuts, toss again, and serve.
  2. Serves 8-10.

Quick notes

Technique note: An easy way to get super thin slices of onion for use when you are eating them uncooked, as in this salad, is to do it this way. Slice an onion in half lengthwise (stem to root), cut off stem end and root end, peel off and discard papery skin. Then peel off a single layer of onion, press it flat against the cutting board, and slice as paper-thin as possible. Chop the onion one layer at a time, for maximum control.

Sesame Cabbage

1/2 cup raw sesame seeds
1/4 tsp salt
1 dried red chili
1 head Cabbage, chopped
3/4 cup water
1 tsp salt

“Popu”
1 1/2 tbsp oil (olive, sesame, canola, etc.)
1 dried red chili, cracked
1 pinch fenugreek
1/4 tsp mustard seed
1 tsp cumin seed

Dry roast sesame seeds and dried red chili in a pan over medium heat. Stir often until majority seeds are brown. Remove from heat and cool. Once cool, grind in a food processor or blender with 1/2 tsp of salt. Excess ground sesame can be stored in the refrigerator for further use. To cook cabbage over medium heat, add chopped cabbage to 3/4 cup boiling water + 1 tsp salt. Cook until cabbage is desired texture. Once cooked, drain excess liquid. Add 1/4-1/2 cup ground sesame. Turn off heat.Prepare the “popu” in a separate pan by combing all ingredients, heating over medium heat, and waiting for mustard seeds to crackle. Once ready, add to cabbage, stir and heat over low heat for 1 minute. The “popu” can be prepared when the cabbage is nearly finished.

Cabbage and Potato Pancakes (from Simplicity – from a Monastery Kitchen)

1/2 head small green cabbage
4 large potatoes, peeled and grated
1 medium sized onion, finely chopped
2 eggs
3/4 c milk
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
a small bunch of parsley, chopped
8 TBS vegetable or olive oil

  1. Quarter the cabbage and steam it for about 6-7 minutes. Drain and chop the cabbage finely.
    2. Place chopped cabbage, grated potatoes, and chopped onion in a big bowl. Mash them thoroughly with a masher and mix them well with a spatula.
    3. In a separate deep bowl beat the eggs. Add the milk and beat some more. Add the cabbage-potato-onion mixture. Add some salt and pepper and the chopped parsley. Mix all the ingredients together until thoroughly blended. Refrigerate 1 hour.
    4. Preheat oven to 250. To make the pancakes use a crepe pan or nonstick skillet. In the pan heat about 1 tablespoon of oil (each time) to low-med and pour in about one eighth of the potato mixture. Flatten the mixture evenly with a spatula and cook over medium heat until the pancake turns brown at the bottom. Turn the pancake over carefully and continue cooking the other side. When the pancake is done, slide it carefully onto an ovenproof platter. Repeat the process until all the pancakes are done. Keep the pancakes in the warm oven until ready to serve.

CUCUMBER AND TOMATO SALAD WITH BUTTERMILK DRESSING
2 cups mayonnaise
1 1/2 cups well-shaken buttermilk
2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar
1/2 cup finely chopped fresh chives
6 medium cucumbers, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
8 beefsteak tomatoes, cut into 1/2-inch wedges
2 heads iceberg lettuce, cored and cut into 2-inch chunks
Whisk together mayonnaise, buttermilk, vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste until smooth, then whisk in chives.

Put cucumbers, tomatoes, and lettuce into bowls and serve with dressing. Cooks’ note:
Buttermilk dressing (without chives) can be made 1 day ahead and chilled, covered. Whisk in chives before serving.

SOBA NOODLE SALAD WITH CUCUMBER AND MANGO
3/4 cup rice vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 large garlic cloves, chopped
1 red jalapeño or serrano chile, seeded, chopped
3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon oriental sesame oil
1 1/2 teaspoons grated lime peel

12 ounces green soba or chuka soba (Japanese-style) noodles

1 large English hothouse cucumber, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced crosswise
1 large ripe mango, peeled, halved, pitted, thinly sliced crosswise
1 cup chopped fresh basil
1 cup chopped fresh mint
1 cup chopped toasted salted peanuts
Lime wedges
Warm vinegar, sugar, and salt in small saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally until sugar dissolves, about 1 minute. Stir in garlic and jalapeño. Cool. Mix in lime juice, sesame oil, and lime peel.

 

Provencal Zucchini and Green Torte (serves 8)

1 lb. greens,  stemmed
2 Tbs olive oil
1 medium onion,  finely chopped
2 lbs zucchini cut into 1/4 inch dice
2-3 large garlic cloves,  crushed
1/2 c. chopped parsley
1 tsp fresh thyme
1-2 tsp fresh chopped rosemary
3 large eggs
1/2 c. Arborio rice,  cooked until tender
1/2 c.shredded Gruyere cheese
1 recipe yeasted Olive Oil Pastry

Before starting,  make the olive oil dough and set it to rise while
you prepare filling.

Blanch the greens until just tender;  drain and cool.  Squeeze out
any excess water and finely chop.

Heat the oil in a large pan,  then saute onions until tender.  Stir
in zucchini,  season with salt and cook until just tender–about 8
minutes.  Stir in garlic and heat for 1 mnute more,  then add
greens,  herbs,  mix well and remove from heat.  Season with salt and
pepper.

Beat eggs in a separate bowl and reserve 2 Tbs for brushing crust.
Combine eggs,  rice,  cheese and veggie mixture.

Heat oven to 375.  Oil a 10-12″ springform pan.  Roll out 2/3 of
dough into a large circle to line springform with edges overhanging.
Scrape in filling.  Roll out remaining dough to fit pan and place
onto filling;  crimp edges together and brush with remaining egg.
Bake 40-50 mnutes.

Olive Oil Pastry

2 tsp yeast
1/2 c lukewarm water
1/2 tsp sugar
1 beaten egg
1/4 c olive oil
2 c. flour (can be up to 1/2 c. whole wheat)
salt

Dissolve yeast in water with sugar and let sit 5-10 minutes.  Add oil
and eggs,  then beat in flour and work just until a smooth elastic
dough.  Place in an oiled bowl to rise for 1 hour until doubled
before using.

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Summer squash enchiladas
Ingredients:
For the enchilada sauce:
10 dried cascabel chiles or 6 dried guajillo chiles
1 canned chipotle chile
2 teaspoons of oil, divided
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 medium yellow onion, diced
1 15-oz. canned tomatoes, drained
2 cups of chicken broth
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon oregano
Salt and black pepper to taste

For the filling:
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 medium yellow onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeño, stems and seeds removed, diced
2 zucchini and 2 yellow squash, diced
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Salt, cayenne and black pepper to taste

For the enchiladas:
12 corn tortillas
2 cups shredded cheese, a mix of Monterey Jack and cheddar

Method:
To make the sauce, in a dry skillet heated on high, take the chiles and toast the chiles on each side for about 10 seconds or just until they start to puff. Leave the heat on and cover the chiles with water. When the water begins to boil and then turn off the heat and let chiles soak until soft, about 30 minutes. Drain the chiles and add to a blender.

Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a skillet and cook the onions for 10 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Place onions and garlic into a blender. Add the canned chipotle chile, the tomatoes, chicken broth, cumin, oregano and blend until smooth.

In a pot, heat 1 teaspoon of oil on low heat, pour in the sauce and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add salt and black pepper to taste and adjust other seasonings as needed.

To make the filling, in a large skillet, heat up the oil on medium-low heat. Add the onions and cook until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and jalapeños and cook for a minute. Add the diced zucchini and yellow squash, cilantro, cumin and sauté for 10 minutes. Add salt, cayenne and black pepper to taste.

Preheat the oven to 350. Grease a 9×13 baking dish. Wrap the tortillas in foil and place in the oven for 5 minutes while the oven is preheating.

Remove tortillas from oven, open the foil (be careful as there may be hot steam), take a tortilla and with tongs dip it into the sauce. Shake off most of the sauce, but make sure that it’s moist enough to be pliable. Lay the tortilla on a plate or clean cooking surface, add a spoonful of the filling down the center of it and then roll the tortilla. Place rolled enchilada in greased baking dish and repeat with remaining tortillas.

Pour sauce over enchiladas and top with shredded cheese. Bake for 10 minutes or until cheese is lightly browned and bubbling. Serve topped with avocado wedges and cotija cheese.

Yield: 4-6 servings

Note: Cascabel chiles are round, about the size of a golf ball and they make a rattling sound when you shake them. Guajillo chiles are red, slender and usually about 4 inches long—they look very similar to New Mexico dried red chiles. Now, in Houston I’ve seen guajillo chiles labeled cascabel chiles—so if it’s long and slender and not round, chances are it’s a guajillo chile.

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Week #13

week #13 share picture

 

 

 

 

  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Zucchini – wow is it on! Time to make zucchini bread, see the recipes below for some family favorites. Try it on the grill, give it away to friends!
  • Broccoli – finally enough for everyone (we hope)
  • Cabbage – try the Mexican Cole slaw recipe below again a family favorite
  • Green onions – the walla wallas are sizing up, so enjoy these green ones while you can
  • Yellow potatoes – so sweet, we enjoy them in the mornings as potato Parsley or cilantro
  • Basil, time to make pesto?
  • Garlic
  • Cucumbers – coming on, most are so sweet, occasionally you get a very bitter one, not sure why, so cut off the ends.
  • Sugar snap peas or wax beans – the peas are on their way out as the beans are coming on, a taste of either.
  • Translucent apples – these are the first apples, they are fairly simple and bruise easily but they make good apple sauce. They are on the first tree as you enter the orchard, pick what your family will use.

The tomatoes are out of control! We hope after the harvest this morning we can wrangle them back into some sort of support system. They are growing like wild things making it difficult to walk down the isles not to say harvest them. There are a very few ripening, but we know they are not far off and by the end of the month we should have tomatoes to share with everyone. The peppers are loading up with tons of small green peppers which also should be in your share by the end of the month. It is really starting to feel like summer.

We have much work to do with 2 new greenhouses to install and the old one to repair. We had few offers to help with this huge project. We will get started sometime this month and hope to get it completed by the end of August in time for fall and winter planting. The fall broccoli and cauliflower is screaming to get in the ground but there is no space on the farm to plant it. We need to pull the onions first and they are not ready yet for prime time. Such is life on a very small farm with ambitions to be bigger!

We still have shares available for ground beef. Please sign up in the barn and leave a deposit of $50. We want orders of 20# or more. This is grass fed beef all pasture raised and the healthiest beef you can eat.

We are not planning on having a canning party this year. We will take a break from this fun but very time consuming activity and see what the interest is next year. If it was something you enjoyed or will miss you should let me know, otherwise it may not happen again. We continue to make cheese, tons of extra work but if it does not sell we will stop making it. I love to make flower bouquets and will continue to do so, again please consider adding this on to your share. Flowers brighten your home, bring you joy and bring the changing seasons into your home. Consider buying a bouquet every week.

The harvest festival will go on. We are planning for October 9th. It should be a great community event, that seems far off but will come up faster than we expect. If you want to lend a hand we can always use extra help on that day. Well, off to harvest now, looks like a nice day, hopefully we’ll get done early and have a chance to steal away to the beach! Happy fourth of July!

Zucchini and Chickpeas
adapted from Mediterranean Vegetables by Clifford Wright

2 T olive oil
1 pound young zucchinis, trimmed and sliced about ½ inch thick
16 oz can chickpeas, drained
2 large garlic cloves, chopped
S & P to taste
2 T finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat and cook the zucchini, chickpeas, garlic, salt and pepper until the zucchini are slightly soft, about 20 minutes. Toss with the parsley and serve hot or at room temperature. Makes 4 servings

Easy Zucchini Soufflé
 By Dave Holt (habanero_holt at yahoo.com)

Sauté:
2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
5 zucchinis, 6-8″ in length, sliced ¼” width
3 cloves garlic, pressed 5 scallions, diced

Soufflé: 
6 eggs, size large
¾ cup sour cream
½ cup grated mozzarella cheese
½ cup grated monterey jack cheese
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
½ teaspoon cardamom

Preparation: 
Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
Prepare a 9×9 ceramic or glass baking disk with a light coating of extra virgin olive oil.

Soufflé Preparation:
Beat eggs and sour cream with a medium sized whisk until thoroughly mixed (This aerates the soufflé and allows us to skip the step of separating whites & yolks – thereby making this an “easy” soufflé). Add cheeses and seasonings and mix well with whisk. Add processed sauté mixture and mix well with whisk. Pour soufflé mixture into baking dish and place in oven, center rack. Bake for one hour at 325 degrees, or for forty minutes using a convection oven (soufflé is done when middle of soufflé has risen to same height as the periphery). Let cool for 10 minutes to set up before cutting and serving.

Serving Suggestions: 
Serve with a dollop of sour cream on top of each serving.

Aunt Joan’s Zucchini, as remembered by Julia

1.5 pounds summer squash, mixed or all one variety
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tablespoons olive oil
some chopped fresh basil
grated fresh parmesan cheese
salt and pepper

Thinly slice the summer squash. Heat oil over moderate heat in medium-large frying pan. Add the minced garlic, and let cook for just a few seconds, don’t let it brown. Then add the squash, spreading out in the pan so it can all cook evenly. Once the first layer is browned up a bit, stir it around the pan, letting the still-uncooked squash hit the oil below for a little browning. You can add a bit more oil at this point if you like. Add some salt and pepper to taste. Once it’s all cooked (7-12 minutes), remove to a serving dish and top with the fresh chopped basil and the parmesan. Serves 3-4

Pasta with Zucchini, Lemon, Pine Nuts, and Herb adapted from The Greens Cook Book

1 pound corkscrew pasta (gemelli, rotelli, etc.)
8 ounces small, firm green or golden zucchini
1/2 c. mixed fresh herbs: Italian parsley, marjoram, basil, chervil, hyssop, oregano, lemon thyme and others (I used basil and thyme, but oregano and marjoram are also good. Avoid tarragon in this dish.)
1 lemon
6 T. virgin olive oil
5 T. pine nuts
1onion or 3 shallots, thinly sliced then roughly chopped
4 t. tiny capers, rinsed in water
2 sun-dried tomatoes, cut into narrow strips (I used 8 halves)
Salt & Pepper
Parmesan (grated, fresh)

Slice the zucchini diagonally into pieces about the same thickness as the pasta (matchstick size, 1/8″ or so). Line up the slices and cut them into narrow matchsticks. Each one will be tipped with green or gold. Make a selection of fresh herbs from those suggested in the ingredients list. Pull the leaves off the stems and chop them, but not too finely. Include any flowers, such as the purple flowers of the basil or pink thyme blossoms. With a vegetable peeler, remove a thin strip of peel from the lemon and cut it into fine slivers. (I grated the peel.) Heat 2 T. olive oil in a small pan and add the pine nuts. Cook them until they begin to color; then add the shallots. Cook the two together over medium low heat until the shallots are soft and the pine nuts are brown. Transfer them to a wide bowl and add the rest of the oil, the capers, lemon peel, sun-dried tomatoes and herbs. Season with salt, freshly ground black pepper and 1/2 teaspoon or so lemon juice to taste. Add salt to the boiling water, drop in the zucchini and cook it about 1 minute. Scoop it out, shake off the water, and add it to the bowl with the other ingredients. Next, cook the pasta, scoop it out and add it to the bowl as well. Toss with a pair of tongs, so that the noodles are coated with the oil and herbs. Serve with the cheese passed separately. For a wine, serve a sauvignon blanc. Serves 2-4.

Baked Summer Squash with Pesto Crumbs
from More Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Renee Shepherd
This can be served as a whole meal, over wild rice and garnished with toasted pecans.

3 lbs. Mixed summer squash
3 Tbs. butter
1 Tbs. olive oil
1/4 cup half-and-half
3/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
1/4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 tsp. mace
1 tsp. sugar
2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
1/4 cup finely chopped cilantro
2 shallots, minced
4 scallions, finely chopped
½ cup Pesto Bread Crumbs Recipe(see below)

Preheat oven to 400F. Lightly oil a 2 ½ to 3 quart casserole dish with cover. Trim squash and cut into large chunks (about 1 ½ inches). Arrange squash pieces in casserole and set aside. Melt butter and olive oil together in a small saucepan. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients, blending thoroughly. Pour sauce mixture over squash, tossing until squash is coated. Cover casserole and bake 40 minutes. Toss squash gently and spoon juices and seasonings from the bottom of dish over squash. Sprinkle with bread crumbs and bake uncovered for 10 minutes longer, until squashes are tender when pierced with a knife.

 

 

Paleo Zucchini Bread (tested and approved by Sue Kass)

 

Preheat oven to 400. Prepare 1 dozen muffin tins or oil and line w/parchment standard loaf pan.

Blend until smooth:
1 c almond butter
2 Tbs cocoa powder
3 Tbs maple syrup
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
Add in
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp apple cider vinegar
Mix well, then fold in
1 c. Shredded zucchini, excess moisture squeezed out.

Muffins take about 15-20 minutes, loaf 30-40.

Doubles, freezes well.

Mexican Coleslaw

Dressing:

2/3 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon maple syrup

½ tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

¼ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon salt

1 garlic clove, minced

1 or 2 jalapeno chiles, stemmed, seeded and minced

 

Slaw:

4 cups shredded cabbage

1 ½ cups shredded carrots

½ cup diced red bell pepper

½ cup minced cilantro

 

To make the dressing:  Mix together the mayonnaise, maple syrup, mustard, rice vinegar, lime juice, cumin, salt, minced garlic and chiles in a bowl.  (If you want a mild salad, add just one chile.)  May be made 1 or 2 days ahead; refrigerate in a covered container.

To make the slaw:  Combine the cabbage, carrots, bell pepper and cilantro in a large bowl.  Add two thirds of the dressing and toss to combine.  (If you like a creamier slaw, add all of the dressing.)

Refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.

Keeps well for up to 1 day in the refrigerator.

SERVES 6

 

Lonnie’s chocolate Zucchini Cake

½ c soft butter

½ c cooking oil

2 eggs

1 ½ c sugar (can be cut down)

1 tsp. Vanilla

2 ½ c flour

1 tsp soda

½ t salt

½ c chocolate chips

½ c sour milk (buttermilk)

4 T cocoa

½ tsp. Cinnamon

2 c grated zucchini

¼ c chopped nuts

 

Mix butter,oil, eggs, sugar, vanilla and milk together.  Add cocoa, soda, cinnamon and salt and mix well.  Add flour, mix well, add zucchini, chocolate chips and nuts.  Mix well.  Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.  13 X 9 inch pan or 2 loaf pans.

Zucchini Bread Geri Jacobs’ Special

 

3 eggs beaten                           1 ½ cup sugar (scant)

1 cup salad oil                         2 cups flour

¼ cup ground orange peel      ½  teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt                        2 teaspoons vanilla

2 teaspoons baking soda         1 cup chopped walnuts

2 teaspoons cinnamon            2/3 cups chopped dates

2 cups grated zucchini

 

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Beat eggs, sugar and oil in mixer until fluffy.  Stir in Zucchini.  Sift baking powder, salt, flour, soda, and cinnamon (set aside ½ cup of the mixture).  Add flour to Zucchini,  Mix well, stir in vanilla.  In cuisenart chop dates, nuts and orange peel.  Mix in the reserved flour mixture.  Add chopped ingredients to other zucchini mixture.  Pour into greased and floured baking pan (2 small loaf pans) and sprinkle with sesame seeds.  Bake at 325 degrees, 50-60 minutes.

 

 

 

 

Chocolate Zucchini Cake 2

A great cake for all that zucchini at the end of the season, and the kids love it too!

Makes 1 9 x 13 inch cake

Printed from Allrecipe, submitted by Sandi

 

½ cup butter, softened                            1 ¾ cup white sugar

½ cup vegetable oil                                 2 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract                       ½ cup sour milk

2 ½ cups all purpose flour                      ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda                          1 cup semiweet chocolate chips

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon                2 cups zucchini, finely diced

chocolate chips

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F, grease and flour a 9 x 13 inch pan.
  2. Cream the butter, oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, vanilla and sour milk(sour milk = 1 teasopon vinager in ½ cup milk)
  3. Mix flour, cocoa, baking soda and cinnamon toger and add to creamed mixture.  Beat well, stir in diced zucchini
  4. Pour into 9 x 13 inch pan and sprinkle with chocolate chips. Bake at 350 for 40 – 45 minutes or until a tooth pick inserted into the center comes out clean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #12!!

Week #12

  • Lettuce
  • Kale or chard
  • Parsley or cilantro
  • Basil
  • Cabbage – don’t let it languish, try the roasted cabbage I recommended last week. It will keep for several weeks in the fridge, but more cabbage are on the way
  • Broccoli – hopefully enough for everyone this week, it is trickling in and not coming to a head in an organized fashion.
  • Green onions or “Purplette”our small salad red onion
  • Garlic
  • Zucchini – finally coming on like we had expected
  • Cucumbers – trickling in and hopefully enough for everyone to taste, not to worry we have many more on the way
  • Sugar snap peas – likely the last as the heat will knock them out until next year!
  • Potatoes – we change from red to yellow!

We continue to plug away at the greenhouses, pulling out spring and adding summer and fall. Greenhouse #3 still looks naked without plastic and half of the crops going to seed. We still have winter squash and pumpkins to get in the ground and no beds to put them in. The fava beans were pulled out last weekend and will be replaced with Brussels Sprouts. Unfortunately we are low on space with some of the crops planted taking more space than allocated. We harvested the first tomato, but it was a bit early and the tomato did not have that rich flavor we have been craving since last fall. They are still a few weeks off, but we should all be eating them by the end of next month.

Juve will send one of his cows to the butcher for ground beef. Sign up in the barn and leave a deposit.

Next weekend is the fourth of July. We will harvest Sunday and you can pick up anytime through Tuesday (if you are a Sun/Mon pick-up).  There are tons of blueberries for you pick in our neighborhood. The Callahan’s are open daily and are about 3 miles west of our farm ((503) 647-5358) West Union Gardens (http://www.westuniongardens.com/) is open for cane berry picking M – S 8 am to 8 pm. The Schoch dairy http://www.schochdairy.com/ is open for business as well with organic farm fresh milk. The are just 1 mile from our farm.

We hope you have a great week, see you around the farm.

 

Sesame Cabbage

1/2 cup raw sesame seeds
1/4 tsp salt
1 dried red chili
1 head Cabbage, chopped
3/4 cup water
1 tsp salt

“Popu”
1 1/2 tbsp oil (olive, sesame, canola, etc.)
1 dried red chili, cracked
1 pinch fenugreek
1/4 tsp mustard seed
1 tsp cumin seed

Dry roast sesame seeds and dried red chili in a pan over medium heat. Stir often until majority seeds are brown. Remove from heat and cool. Once cool, grind in a food processor or blender with 1/2 tsp of salt. Excess ground sesame can be stored in the refrigerator for further use. To cook cabbage over medium heat, add chopped cabbage to 3/4 cup boiling water + 1 tsp salt. Cook until cabbage is desired texture. Once cooked, drain excess liquid. Add 1/4-1/2 cup ground sesame. Turn off heat.Prepare the “popu” in a separate pan by combing all ingredients, heating over medium heat, and waiting for mustard seeds to crackle. Once ready, add to cabbage, stir and heat over low heat for 1 minute. The “popu” can be prepared when the cabbage is nearly finished.

Cabbage and Potato Pancakes (from Simplicity – from a Monastery Kitchen)

1/2 head small green cabbage
4 large potatoes, peeled and grated
1 medium sized onion, finely chopped
2 eggs
3/4 c milk
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
a small bunch of parsley, chopped
8 TBS vegetable or olive oil

  1. Quarter the cabbage and steam it for about 6-7 minutes. Drain and chop the cabbage finely.
    2. Place chopped cabbage, grated potatoes, and chopped onion in a big bowl. Mash them thoroughly with a masher and mix them well with a spatula.
    3. In a separate deep bowl beat the eggs. Add the milk and beat some more. Add the cabbage-potato-onion mixture. Add some salt and pepper and the chopped parsley. Mix all the ingredients together until thoroughly blended. Refrigerate 1 hour.
    4. Preheat oven to 250. To make the pancakes use a crepe pan or nonstick skillet. In the pan heat about 1 tablespoon of oil (each time) to low-med and pour in about one eighth of the potato mixture. Flatten the mixture evenly with a spatula and cook over medium heat until the pancake turns brown at the bottom. Turn the pancake over carefully and continue cooking the other side. When the pancake is done, slide it carefully onto an ovenproof platter. Repeat the process until all the pancakes are done. Keep the pancakes in the warm oven until ready to serve.

ANDY’S FAVORITE CABBAGE

Sliced green cabbage
sliced onion (red, green or white)
olive oil
salt
pepper
white wine

Sauté the onion and cabbage in oil, then add wine, salt and pepper.  This is a magnificent dish.

Sunday Chili

Adapted from the Vegetarian Times ||| the reasons I like this recipe: it’s healthy, it’s easy to make and easy to adapt to what I have on hand. (any kind of bean, fresh or canned tomatoes, any alliums: leeks, green garlic, ‘regular’ onions, etc, any kind of bell pepper (I personally don’t care for green) or leave the pepper out, etc. you get the idea. -Julia) AND it freezes well in smaller portions for when I’m having one of ‘those’ days!

3 cups dry kidney beans (I used canned, you can use nearly any kind of bean you have on hand)
2-3 onions
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 colored bell pepper, chopped
1-2 cups coarsely chopped green cabbage
1/2 cup diced unpeeled potatoes
2 cups chopped tomatoes, or 10 oz. can tomatoes, with liquid
1 to 2 tbs chili powder (or mix this with fresh hot peppers, finely chopped)
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 cup uncooked brown rice
5 cups water or vegetable broth (I used broth)
salt and pepper to taste

Soak beans overnight in cold water to cover. Drain. Put beans in slow cooker. (Or skip all this and use canned if in a hurry) In a large skillet over medium-high heat, water sauté onion and garlic until soft, about 3 to 5 min. (or oil sauté them in a tablespoon cooking oil) add bell pepper, cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes, chili powder, and cumin. Continue cooking, stirring frequently, for 3 min; transfer to slow cooker. Add rice and broth, cover and cook on low for 6 to 8 hours. Season to taste. Serves 8

 

Zucchini pizza crust (makes 4-6 servings)

Crust

3 ½ cups grated zucchini

3 eggs beaten1/3 cup flour

½ cup shredded low fat mozzarella cheese

½ cup parmesan cheese

½ teaspoon dried basil

 

Topping

Use your favorite pizza toppings

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees

Combine all the crust ingredients, and spread into an oiled 9 X 13 inch pan.  Bake for 20-25 minutes until the surface is dry and firm.  Brush the top with a little oil and broil it, under moderate heat, for 5 minutes.

 

Pile all you favorite pizza toppings on and bake at 350 for about 25 minutes.

 

Zucchini-Ginger Cupcakes With Cream Cheese-White Chocolate Frosting

Makes about 24 cupcakes

If you want to gild the lily, make rosettes out of candied zucchini ribbons: Boil 1 cup water with 1 cup sugar for 5 minutes. Shave ribbons of zucchini into syrup and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes until zucchini is translucent. Drain, air dry and curl into rosettes.

Ingredientsa

Cupcakes

  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 cups shredded zucchini
  • 1 8-ounce can crushed pineapple, undrained
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 packed tablespoons minced crystallized ginger
  • 1 cup sweetened flaked coconut
  • 1 cup toasted chopped pecans (see note)

Frosting:

  • 4 ounces chopped white chocolate, plus 1 ounce shaved white chocolate (divided)
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 4 ounces unsalted butter, softened
  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • Dash vanilla
  • About 24 slivers crystallized ginger (optional garnish)

Instructions

To make cupcakes: Preheat oven to 350 degrees (use a regular oven, not convection).

In the bowl of a mixer fitted with a paddle, combine the oil and the sugar and mix until smooth. Add the eggs and vanilla and mix well. Add the zucchini and pineapple and mix well. Add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt; mix well. Remove from the mixer and fold in the crystallized ginger, coconut and nuts. Fill 24 cupcake liners about three-quarters full with batter. Bake just until the center springs back slowly, about 18 to 20 minutes. Remove and cool.

To make frosting: Place the chopped chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl; microwave on high (100 percent power) for 30 seconds. Stir, microwave another 15 seconds, then stir until all chocolate is melted.

Place the cream cheese and butter in the bowl of a mixer and whip until very smooth. Turn off the mixer and add the powdered sugar (start the machine up slowly so you don’t wear the sugar). Mix the frosting until very smooth. Add a dash of vanilla and mix well. Remove from the mixer and fold in the melted white chocolate. Frost the cupcakes and top with the shaved white chocolate and a sliver of crystallized ginger.

Note: To toast nuts, spread on baking sheet and bake in 350-degree oven for 5 to 8 minutes or until they start to brown.

Zucchini and Egg Casserole

Sauté 3 cups of Zucchini chopped
1 medium onion
crush 2 cloves of garlic

Mix:  4 eggs
1/4 cup dried or fresh parsley
1/2 cup parmesan
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/4 black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary

Then add to above and mix well.  Place in an 8 X 8 baking dish gently oiled with butter or pam.  Bake for 25 minutes and then add 1 cup of jack cheese to the top of the dish.

 

CAULIFLOWER GRATIN WITH GRUYERE AND HAZELNUTS

1 medium cauliflower

Salt and freshly ground pepper

½ cup crème fraiche (see note)

¾ c. shredded gruyere cheese

3 Tbsp. bread crumbs

3 Tbsp. hazelnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped

2 Tbsp. flat parsley for garnish

 

Butter a 2-quart baking dish or gratin pan.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Cut cauliflower into small florets.  Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt generously.  Add cauliflower florets to pot and cook until tender, but not mushy, about 5 minutes.  Drain florets and pat dry with a kitchen towel.  Toss cauliflower with crème fraiche and half the cheese in the prepared baking dish.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Sprinkle remaining cheese over cauliflower, then top with bread crumbs and hazelnuts.  Bake on center rack until cheese has melted and bread crumbs and nuts are golden, 20-25 minutes or more.  Garnish with parsley.  Serves 5 or 6.  Note: you can make crème fraiche by whisking 1 cup whipping cream with 1/3 c. sour cream in a nonreactive bowl.  Let stand at room temperature until thickened, 6 hours or longer; then cover and refrigerate.  Makes about 1 1/3 cups. From Foodday.

This recipe uses 3 of this week’s ingredients all at once!

Sara’s Great Frittata Recipe:

2 lbs summer squash
Salt
Green onions(healthy fistful chopped)
Basil leaves(fistful again)
2 garlic cloves
4 eggs
1/4 Cup oil
1 Cup flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 Cup parmesan/pecorino cheese

The summer squash, green onions, and basil make a wonderful frittata.
In the main bowl of a food processor, grate about two pounds of summer squash. Put the squash in a colander and lightly salt. Leave to drain, and put the chopping blade in the food processor. Add a healthy fistful of onions and the leaves from a bunch of basil. Toss in a couple garlic cloves if you have them, and pulse until well chopped. In a big bowl, mix around a cup of flour with a couple teaspoons of baking powder and about a half cup of grated parmesan or pecorino Romano cheese. Lightly beat four eggs and a quarter cup of oil (if you’re feeling decadent and there are no vegetarians in the crowd, add a couple spoonfuls of bacon grease). Put the grated squash in a thin clean dishtowel or heavy duty paper towel and squeeze out excess liquid. Combine all the ingredients in the big bowl. You should have a thick, fragrant batter. Pour the batter into a greased 13×9 baking pan and sprinkle a little more cheese on top. Bake at 375 degrees until golden, about 30-45 minutes (it depends on the moisture left in the squash). When cool, cut into squares and serve.
These make great appetizers or savory treats at a tea or coffee!

 

 

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Week #11

• Lettuce
• Garlic
• New potatoes
• Zucchini
• Parsley
• Kale or chard
• Broccoli
• Green onions (scallions)
• Sugar snap peas – last week
• Fava beans – last week
• Beets
• Kohlrabi or fennel (last week)
Well, never a dull moment on the farm. Gusty winds yesterday tore the plastic off our greenhouse #3 sending plastic with wood and metal flying 30 feet into the air landing on our broccoli and newly weeded shallots. It looked like a giant animal ranged thru our fields flattening everything in it’s wake. The greenhouse will be torn down and moved. The crops inside (mainly tomatoes and peppers) will survive without the plastic although they will not be protected from late blight (a disease spread by summer rain splashing soil onto the leaves). We are hopeful the shallots will recover. They are just about to start forming their bulb and got their greens knocked off. Honestly this farming thing makes me want to scream!! Oh yeah, the wimpy sugar snap peas were knocked down as well.
Who knows when the greenhouse will be removed and rebuilt but it has to happen sometime this summer so that fall and winter crops can get in the ground. We have a new greenhouse on the way from the factory (taking about 10 weeks longer than projected) so there will be lots of construction happening this summer. If you are handy and interested please do let us know. These will be huge projects that go much quicker if there are many hands. We may set up some work parties if I have anything to do with it.
On the duller side this week we have been pulling out spring crops and replacing them with fall crops like cabbage and Romanesco cauliflower. We plant lettuce every week and are planting more pole beans. The hoop houses #1 and #4 have been completely transformed and transplanted. We have tons of cucumbers and melons in #1, plus some safety tomatoes and peppers (good thing right!). Greenhouse # 4 has the most beautiful peppers in full bloom. The tomatoes in there look strong and healthy as well. Greenhouse #3 you have heard about, hopefully we can fill the half that has mustard and chard gone to seed with more winter squash and pumpkins. Greenhouse #2 is half peppers and half weeds.
We managed to get the onions and leeks and shallots weeded (this is the third weeding, one more to go before harvest. They should come out of the ground at the end of July or beginning of August. We a ready need the space for the fall broccoli! The flowers are in full bloom, sunflowers galore. Please do consider buying a bouquet, they last all week and really brighten your home. I am making fewer and fewer as they languish in the cooler, so you can always text me and I will make a bouquet special for you 503-568-5760.
It is time to wish all those Fathers out there happy Father’s Day. You are all special, you are all needed and loved. Enjoy your day! Off to harvest and make cheese and . . .

Roasted Cabbage (Our families new favorite way to eat cabbage 2014)
1 head cabbage
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt
Pepper
Parmesan cheese
Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut the cabbage in half and now cut into wedges 3- 4 per half leaving a bit of the core on each wedge. Arrange the wedges on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with olive oil, salt and pepper and now turn over and do the same. On the second side sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Put the cabbage in the oven for 20 – 30 minutes, it should be golden brown and crispy on the outer leaves. Remove from the oven and enjoy! We will never let another cabbage head go to waste.
And another – super easy but would be great with your beef that’s coming!

Finquita Beef and Cabbage Sauté
1 lb Finquita ground beef 🙂
large white onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp olive oil
1 large head cabbage chopped
Herbamare herb seasoning salt (or other seasoning of choice)
Salt and pepper

Using a large sauté pan, sauté onion and garlic in olive oil, add ground beef, season with Herbamare, salt and pepper to taste. Cook completely. Add cabbage and simmer until tender. Serve warm. My kids like this dish served over rice with soy sauce or sweet chili sauce. I love it as is!

Roman-Style Raw Fava Beans, Scamorza(or Smoked Mozzarella), and Fresh Onion
Antipasto di Fave e Cipolla Fresca
from Verdura by Vivana La Place
A springtime antipasto of raw fava beans and new onions. Eating tender fava beans is a special treat. Eat them unpeeled if you enjoy the refreshing bitter edge of the peel, or peel them first for a sweeter flavor. Serve this dish with crusty breadsticks, a sturdy country loaf, or black pepper taralli, a type of pretzel found in Italian specialty markets, and company with a pitcher of cool dry wine.
2 pounds fava beans, unshelled weight
a few small lettuce leaves
3 scallions or 1 small fresh onion, thinly sliced
1 pound scamorza cheese, sliced (substitute smoked mozzarella)
Basket of bread sticks, black pepper taralli, or bread
Shell the favas and mound in the center of a platter. Surround with the lettuce leaves and scatter the onions over the top. Arrange slices of the cheese around the edge of the platter. Serve with the bread.
Provencal Zucchini and Green Torte (serves 8)

1 lb. greens, stemmed
2 Tbs olive oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 lbs zucchini cut into 1/4 inch dice
2-3 large garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 c. chopped parsley
1 tsp fresh thyme
1-2 tsp fresh chopped rosemary
3 large eggs
1/2 c. Arborio rice, cooked until tender
1/2 c. Shredded Gruyere cheese
1 recipe yeasted Olive Oil Pastry

Before starting, make the olive oil dough and set it to rise while
you prepare filling.

Blanch the greens until just tender; drain and cool. Squeeze out
any excess water and finely chop.

Heat the oil in a large pan, then sauté onions until tender. Stir
in zucchini, season with salt and cook until just tender–about 8
minutes. Stir in garlic and heat for 1 minute more, then add
greens, herbs, mix well and remove from heat. Season with salt and
pepper.

Beat eggs in a separate bowl and reserve 2 Tbs for brushing crust.
Combine eggs, rice, cheese and veggie mixture.

Heat oven to 375. Oil a 10-12″ spring form pan. Roll out 2/3 of
dough into a large circle to line spring form with edges overhanging.
Scrape in filling. Roll out remaining dough to fit pan and place
onto filling; crimp edges together and brush with remaining egg.
Bake 40-50 minutes.

Olive Oil Pastry

2 tsp yeast
1/2 c lukewarm water
1/2 tsp sugar
1 beaten egg
1/4 c olive oil
2 c. flour (can be up to 1/2 c. whole wheat)
salt

Dissolve yeast in water with sugar and let sit 5-10 minutes. Add oil
and eggs, then beat in flour and work just until a smooth elastic
dough. Place in an oiled bowl to rise for 1 hour until doubled
before using.
Roasted Beets w/ Feta

Directions
Peel 4 medium beets and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste on a baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring once or twice, until tender, 35 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; toss with 4 chopped scallions and 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Top with crumbled feta.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/roasted-beets-with-feta-recipe.html

Zucchini and Egg Casserole
Sauté 3 cups of Zucchini chopped
1 medium onion
crush 2 cloves of garlic

Mix: 4 eggs
1/4 cup dried or fresh parsley
1/2 cup parmesan
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/4 black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary

Then add to above and mix well. Place in an 8 X 8 baking dish gently oiled with butter or pam. Bake for 25 minutes and then add 1 cup of jack cheese to the top of the dish.

BEET SOUP (AKA Root vegetable soup)

Small bunch of beets
Small bunch of carrots
Onion or shallots or leeks
Garlic or green garlic
Cabbage (if you have it 1/3 head)
2 – 4 TBSP Olive Oil
Fresh dill
Small can tomato paste
1 tsp salt or as needed
1 tsp caraway seeds ground, or as needed
sour cream

Chop garlic & onion & gently sauté
Chop or Julianne beets, carrots, & potato & stir fry with onion &
garlic, about 10 min until just starting to get tender
Add cabbage if you have it
Add 1 – 2 cups water and about 1 – 2 small cans of tomato paste (to
taste)
Cook
When vegetables are tender it’s done.
Serve with a dollop of sour cream.

Laura

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Week #10

Week #10

  • Lettuce – enjoy romaine and salanova
  • Garlic
  • New potatoes
  • Zucchini
  • Basil
  • Parsley or Dill or Cilantro
  • Kale or chard
  • Broccoli or Cabbage
  • Green onions (scallions)
  • Sugar snap peas
  • Fava beans.
  • Beets or carrots
  • Fennel or kohlrabi

 

What a change from last weekend to today! It is currently 45 degrees instead of 75 and the max today will be 75 degrees instead of 102! This weather is crazy making. The light rain was just enough to give the weeds a boost and keep the farmers running. Some of the beds are so deep in weeds it is hard to know what the plant is we are supposed to be harvesting. We are busy trying to turn over the spring greenhouses into summer melon and cucumber growing hot houses, but there is never enough time in the day or night (we often work until dark).

I have seeded much of the fall col crops (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage) and need to transplant much more as we wait to turn over outside beds. Lettuce and chard and unsuccessful spring crops need to be pulled to make room for the cool weather crops. Juve tied up more tomatoes but that work is almost never done as they love the heat. The flowers have gone wild. I took 14 buckets to market yesterday and came home with 2 small bouquets! I will try and get to cut flowers for you all, but as they languish in the cooler without a home I find other work beacons to me instead. I am always happy to make you a bouquet when I am around, or leave you a special bouquet if you text me ahead of time.

This week Juve gets to go to  the “Copa America ”. As part of his birthday gift Mark, Rachel and Adam got him a ticket to the game in Seattle to watch Leonel Messi. He will get a much needed break from the farm on Tuesday and Wednesday this week. Fortunately I have the day off on Wednesday and the help of our two sons Jacob and Diego who are on break from college to help get the harvest in. We will scrabble later today and tomorrow to get the work done.

We continue to welcome new members to the farm. If you have friends or family interested please do let them know to contact us. See the recipes below, this is likely the last week for Favas, so much work but worth it. Blanch the shelled beans in boiling water to help remove the outer husk on each bean, well worth the trouble, but it is a good thing they only come once a year.

Roasted Cabbage (Our family’s new favorite way to eat cabbage 2014)

1 head cabbage

Extra virgin olive oil

Salt

Pepper

Parmesan cheese

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut the cabbage in half and now cut into wedges 3- 4 per half leaving a bit of the core on each wedge. Arrange the wedges on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with olive oil, salt and pepper and now turn over and do the same. On the second side sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Put the cabbage in the oven for 20 – 30 minutes, it should be golden brown and crispy on the outer leaves. Remove from the oven and enjoy! We will never let another cabbage head go to waste.

 

Beet with Sesame Vinaigrette (family favorite)

1 pound beets (after cooking there should be about 2 cups)

6 tablespoons mild olive oil

2 teaspoons Oriental sesame oil

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons sesame seeds, additional for garnish

salt and pepper to taste

 

Trim tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch from the beets, so that they don’t bleed too much.  Put the beets in a pot and cover with cold water.  Heat to boiling, then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered until tender.  Pour off most of the hot water and add cold water to the pot.  Peel the beets while they are still warm.  Or you may rub the beets with a little oil and bake them in a covered pan at 350 until tender.  If the beets are large, cut them into ¼ inch slices.  If they are small, cut them into 4 – 8 wedges.  Place the beets in a large mixing bowl.

Whisk the remaining ingredients together, pour over the still warm beets, and toss to coat.  Sprinkle more sesame seeds if you like and serve.

 

A great salad can be made with beets and broccoli.  We steam the broccoli and beets together with the sliced beets on bottom.  Generally, when the broccoli is done (i.e. just turned dark green and starting to get tender) the beets are also done.  We then toss them in a simple vinaigrette and can serve either warm or cold.  This vinaigrette is the one we use:

 

VINAIGRETTE

 

 

1 clove garlic

1 tsp salt

3 Tbs red wine vinegar

1 tsp wet mustard

5 Tbs extra virgin olive oil

black pepper

 

Press garlic into the bottom of  your salad bowl.  With a fork, mix well with salt until it forms a paste.  Mix in vinegar and mustard until salt is dissolved.  Whisk in olive oil to make an emulsion.  Add black pepper to taste.  These proportions are in no way set in stone.  You should experiment to find the proportions you prefer.  Also, other spices, herbs and vinegars can be used to vary the dressing.

Zucchini Pesto

Lyn–this is the one that was in the Oregonian–it’s quite good! Pretty tasty straight up, but seems like it would be great on crostini or pizza, or w/chicken or fish, for instance…

1/2 c olive oil
1 large shallot chopped (I used a sweet onion)
6 garlic cloves
3 Tbs toasted blanched almond slivers
1 medium zucchini, cut into 1/2 ” dice
1 c basil leaves
1 tsp lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste.

Fava Bean and Parsley Salad

Chick Pea and Parsley salad (use Fava beans instead of Chick Peas)

Salata-T-Hummous

 

½ cup dry chick peas, soaked overnight

½ cup finely chopped onion

1 cup finely chopped parsley

¼ cup olive oil

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

¼ cup chick pea juice

½ teasp, salt or more

1 small clove of garlic, crushed (optional)

 

(use fava beans instead of chick peas, peel off the green husk. Put beans in boiling water for 2- 3 minutes then rinse in cold water. Peel the white outer covering of each bean) Cook chick peas in soaking liquid 1-11/4 hours, until tender. You should have 1 ½ cup cooked. Drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking juice for salad. Combine chick peas with onion and parsley, tossing well. Dress with lemon juice, olive oil, cooking juices, salt and optional garlic. Chill before serving.

FAVA BEAN Salad

Ingredients

4 cups shucked fresh fava beans
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 pound Manchego cheese, shaved thinly (or Asiago or Romano)
2 tablespoons finely chopped flatleaf parsley

Directions

Fill a bowl with ice and water. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the fava beans and cook until just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and shock in ice water. Drain again and remove outer skins. Place the beans in a medium serving bowl. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, garlic and olive oil and whisk until blended. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour the mixture over the beans and mix well. Add the cheese, sprinkle with the parsley and serve.

GREEK STYLE FENNEL

3 bulbs
2 tbsp.
1 clove
2 lg.
1/4 tsp.
1/4 tsp.
2 tsp.
1/2 cup
handful
fennel
olive oil
garlic, minced
tomatoes, diced
salt
pepper
fresh chopped herb (chervil, marjoram, or parsley, or other…)
feta cheese
reserved fennel tops

Cut off the stalks and feathery leaves of the fennel. Chop and reserve some of the leaves for garnish. Cut fennel bulbs vertically into 8 sections. In a skillet, heat olive oil, ad garlic and fennel, and saute for 3 to 4 minutes. Uncover, add salt, pepper and the fresh herb and cook over low heat until most of the liquid is reduced. Serve sprinkled with the garnish of feta cheese and reserved fennel tops. adapted from More Recipes from a Kitchen Garden by Shepherd and Raboff

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #9

  • Lettuce – enjoy the sweet centers of this amazing lettuce “Kiribati” recommended to me by my friend Jamie at Springhill Farm.
  • kale or chard
  • sugar snap peas (just a few, waiting for the outside crop to take off)
  • green onions – add them to any meat stir fry for delicious flavor
  • fennel – crisp licorice flavor add to salads or kohlrabi
  • fava beans – once a year we feature these delicious labor of love legumes, see recipes below (peeling them is a great thing to do on a hot day)
  • Herb of your choice: parsley or cilantro or dill or basil
  • garlic – starting to dry down, still with a thicker outer covering, good to use this week
  • beets or carrots
  • potatoes – so sweet, enjoy
  • zucchini – the first of the summer squash, just a taste of what is to come!

Umbrian Fava Bean Stew (Scafata)

This recipe is about as simple as spring cooking gets. It’s adapted from Antonella Santolini’s La Cucina Delle Regioni D’Italia: Umbria The name comes from the Umbrian word for the hull of the beans.

2 Tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup shelled fava beans
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped fennel
1 1/2 cups chopped chard leaves
1 1/2 cups chopped, peeled tomatoes
salt, pepper

Cook oil, beans, onion, fennel, carrot and chard over low heat in medium saucepan. When beans are quite tender, after about 45 minutes, add tomatoes and cook for another 25 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

FAVA BEAN Salad

Ingredients

4 cups shucked fresh fava beans
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 pound Manchego cheese, shaved thinly (or Asiago or Romano)
2 tablespoons finely chopped flatleaf parsley

Directions

Fill a bowl with ice and water. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the fava beans and cook until just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and shock in ice water. Drain again and remove outer skins. Place the beans in a medium serving bowl. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, garlic and olive oil and whisk until blended. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour the mixture over the beans and mix well. Add the cheese, sprinkle with the parsley and serve.

 

 

Fava Bean “Ful”

Lebanese bean dish

INGREDIENTS NEEDED:

  • 1 can of fava beans -drained
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 2 cloves of crushed garlic
  • ¼ cup of olive oil
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 finely chopped tomato
  • 1 green onion thinly sliced

PERPERATION:

  • In pan sauté garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil until the garlic is lightly golden. Add the drained fava beans and bring to a boil and simmer on low. Then add the lemon, salt and pepper and mix while trying to mash at least half the fava beans. Turn heat off and remove from oven.
  • Place the cooked fava beans in a serving dish.
  • Garnish the beans with parsley, tomato, green onions and the re remaining olive oil. Serve with pita bread and a plate filled a Varity of fresh vegetables of your choose.

 

 

 

Kohlrabi Coleslaw from Jane Brody

Salad:
1 1/4 lbs kohlrabi, peeled and coarsely shredded
2 lge carrots, peeled and coarsely shredded
1/2 sweet red pepper, seeded and diced
1/2 c. chopped scallions, including green

Dressing:
2 T oil, pref olive oil
2 T vinegar (I used white wine vinegar)
2 t or more fresh snipped dill
1 t sugar (I used 1/4 t)
1/2 t ea. cumin and mustard powder
1/4 t crumbled tarragon
1/4 t ea. salt and pepper
1/3 c plain yoghurt

Toss salad ingredients in a bowl. In a separate bowl, blend oil and vinegar, then blend in other ingredients. Pour over salad, toss, cover and refrigerate for about 2 hrs before serving.
Serves 6

Spring Onion Sandwiches
from Chez Panisse Vegetables by Alice Waters

Onion Sandwiches were an old favorite of James Beard’s. These are best made in may when onions are very sweet. Trim the crusts off thin slices of good white bread. Spread two slices of bread with mayonnaise, on one side. Slice fresh onion very thinly and make a layer of onion slices on one slice of bread. Top that with the other slice of bread. Dip the four side edges of the sandwich into thin mayonnaise and then into chopped parsley.

“One of our favorite ways to enjoy scallions is as a vegetable side dish.” Marcella, a CSA member:

occasionally, 5 minutes.

Zucchini Trifolati (family favorite)

Sautéed Zucchini

The secret to this fabulous cooking technique is the long slow cooking which infuses all the flavors.  Vegetables cooked this way make great pasta sauce or you can serve them as crostini.  Try mushrooms with garlic and mint.

2 pounds Zucchini

4 cloves of garlic, sliced

chili pepper (or herbs)

Salt

 

Cover the bottom of a large sauté pan with olive oil.  Add the sliced garlic and chile peppers to the pan; NOW turn on the heat.  Slice the zucchini into thin slices and add to the golden garlic, salt and cover the pan.  The salt will bring out the liquid in the zucchini and they will stew in their own juices and infuse with the garlic.  Let them over cook.  It is a pleasant surprise.

 

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Week #8

Week # 8

  • Fennel – sweet licorice flavor, new this week, see recipes below
  • Potatoes – fresh new potatoes, enjoy their fresh flavor
  • Kale – never can get enough of this amazing green
  • Lettuce – we have tons and with the heat we had to harvest most of it and quick
  • Green onions – again, the healthiest alium, add to just about any meal
  • Sugar snap peas – the indoor peas are slowing and the outdoor peas are blooming, a small but steady stream of these sweet spring treats
  • Swiss chard or spinach – spring is full of greens, add them to your morning smoothie
  • kohlrabi – if you haven’t figured out how to eat this sweet bulb, just peel, slice and eat, like a turnip, otherwise go to the kohlrabi tab and look at a recipe.
  • Carrots or beets – this will likely be the end of sweet carrots for a while. Germination challenges have plagued us and until we can find a new indoor bed to replant we will wait for fall. More beets on the way.
  • Fresh garlic – the rust has finally done in the garlic. We will harvest it all today and hang it in the barn to dry. The rust affects the green growing part of the garlic so the heads are small. There is nothing we can do organically to control the rust and each year it is worse no matter where we plant the garlic.

 

Keeping up with the weeds is a full time job! We managed to finish the harvest early last week and our harvest helpers turned into weeders. We weeded the onions and Juvencio finished the bed. The rest of the week has been a slow haul through the garden, bed by bed pulling out generations of weeds. Don’t worry if you missed the fun there are plenty more on the way.

We said good bye to Maria, our Catlin senior student who spent the month of May helping and learning on the farm. She helped harvest, seed, weed and sell at the farmers market. It was fun to have her and the extra set of hands made our work better. We wish her the best of luck at U of O this fall and hope she will keep in touch.

It is not too late to plant your home garden. We still have some tomato starts, peppers, eggplant, cucumbers. Send me a text or email or catch me around the farm. I keep selling all these starts at the farmers market in Beaverton, but if you want to get that garden in now is a great time.

As spring turns to summer (to fast for us this week with record breaking temperatures) we look to warm weather crops. The transplanted tomatoes outside look green and will get a boost from warm. The hoop house tomatoes are about 2 ½ feet tall and got a heavy pruning this week and have been staked. The indoor peppers are bulking up while the outdoor peppers are not far behind. The eggplant and tomatillos are in the ground and look “shocked”, we know they will turn around. Juve retiled and composted the winter squash beds last night and we managed to plant 150 squash plants, about 1/3 of the entire crop. We covered it with reemay (agricultural fabric) to keep the cucumber beetles off of it for long enough for it to grow (about three weeks). Once it begins to flower we pull off the fabric, clear the weeds and watch it take off.

We will turn over greenhouse #1 (the goat ravaged greenhouse) this week or next and fill it with some other warm weather crops. We have more cucumbers and peppers to get in the ground and then we had better call it quits or we’ll be pickling all summer. We will hot water bath treat the fall broccoli and cauliflower seed this week and get those crops going. The spring broccoli looks quite unhappy, it may be a poor showing. We will have to wait and see how the upper beds look.

We appreciate the help with harvest, many hands make light work. Please do sign up to help us harvest it gives you a glimpse into the difference between gardening and farming, it helps connect you to others in the CSA and it helps your farmers get the harvest done and move on to the farm work of the day.

See you around the farm!

Cannellini Beans with Tarragon and Roasted Fennel || from Chef Jonathan Miller
I make some variation on this very often, as it can be made year round here. Some of you may recognize the flavor combination here from very similar recipes I’ve posted before in the Ladybug Postcard. I also made a version of this salad with raw fennel and grilled radicchio quarters and it worked very well. Kids love this bean salad because of its licorice overtones and the cheese.

1 c cannellini beans, soaked overnight in cold water
2 fennel bulbs, halved, cored, and thinly sliced crosswise
1 bunch tarragon, chopped
1/2 t fennel seeds, ground
4 T sherry vinegar
4 t Dijon
6 T crème fraiche
12 T olive oil
4 T parsley, chopped
8 oz Italian fontina, diced

Drain the beans and put into a pot with cold water to cover by at least 2 inches. Bring to a boil, skim any foam off the top, then lower the heat, add a generous amount of salt the pot, cover, and simmer slowly until the beans are soft, but not mushy, about 45-60 minutes. Drain.

While the beans cook, heat the oven to 400 and toss the sliced fennel with some olive oil and salt. Roast until colored and softened, and sweet, about 25-30 minutes.

Combine 2 T of the chopped tarragon, the fennel seeds, sherry vinegar, Dijon, and crème fraiche in a bowl. Whisk well. Add the olive oil and continue whisking until emulsified.

When the beans are cooked and drained, fold in the dressing, mixing thoroughly, but gently. Stir in the roasted fennel, the parsley, the cheese, and the remaining chopped tarragon. Taste to make sure you like it, and serve room temperature.

Fennel, Orange & Caper Salad
Note from Julia: I made this and it’s REALLY good. It’s pictured above. In the photo, I used kalamata olives instead of the capers.

2 bulbs fennel
1 Tablespoon cabers, drained
1 Tablespoon dill or chervil, fresh, chopped
Dressing
1/2 orange, seeded
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons sugar (I often omit this)
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 Tablespoons olive oil

Trim the stalks from the fennel, cut the bulb in half lengthwise; then cut crosswise into very thin slices. Place in a large bowl with the capers and the dill.. Make the dressing. Cut the quarter orange in small pieces and place in the work bowl of a food processor with the vinegar, mustard, and sugar and salt. .Process until smooth. With the motor running slowly, pour in the olive oil. Pour over the fennel, toss well and serve.

Fennel Salad

Make 4 servings
Preparation time: about 20 minutes.
NOTE: The amounts are all approximate and flexible. This is a very improvisational recipe.

Ingredients

1 small head organic butter (Boston) lettuce, cleaned and spun dry
1 medium-sized bulb organic fennel, sliced paper thin (a mandolin works best.)
2 organic navel oranges, peeled and sliced into thin rounds
15 oil-cured or Kalamata olives, pitted and sliced
5 or 6 organic dried figs, cut into small pieces
1 – 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon organic lemon juice, plus more to taste if you like
1/2 cup blanched, slivered almonds, lightly toasted (optional)

Directions

  1. Wash and dry the lettuce, then tear it into bite sized pieces into a large salad bowl. Add the fennel, oranges, olives, and figs, and toss.
    2. Drizzle the salad with the olive oil, and toss until everything is lightly but thoroughly coated. Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, if you like, and toss again. Refrigerate until serving (but not longer than about 1 hour).
    3. Just before serving drizzle in about 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice and sprinkle in — or top with —the almonds and cheese shavings, if you like. Toss quickly but thoroughly, and serve right away.

Beets with Fennel (My version as I couldn’t find the book I got the delicious recipe from)

 

1 bunch beets (steamed, leave 1” of tops and the whole root on, steam and then peel)

1 fennel bulb cut in quarters and then slice thinly

1 sweet onion, chopped finely

Toasted walnuts, about 1 cup

2 tablespoons of chopped parsley

 

Vinaigrette

4 T extra virgin olive oil (is there any other kind?!)

1 teaspoon walnut oil (I used sesame)

1 T, plus a dash more Champagne vinegar

Salt and pepper

 

Mix cooked beets, onion, fennel and walnuts together, add parsley and toss with vinaigrette.  Chill or serve warm, we loved it.

ROASTED NEW POTATOES WITH SPRING HERB PESTO
3/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/3 cup chopped fresh chives
3 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/2 teaspoon salt

2 1/2 pounds red-skinned new potatoes, halved lengthwise
Blend parsley, chives, rosemary, 1 tablespoon olive oil, garlic, lemon juice, lemon peel, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in processor to coarse puree. (Pesto can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Preheat oven to 400°F. Toss potatoes and remaining 2 tablespoons oil in large bowl. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Arrange potatoes, cut side down, on rimmed baking sheet. Roast until potatoes are golden brown and tender, about 40 minutes. Using spatula, transfer potatoes to large bowl. Add pesto and toss to coat. Serve.

LEG OF LAMB WITH MINT PESTO, NEW POTATOES AND BABY CARROTS
has been sent to you from lyn

You can view the complete recipe online at: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/1721

LEG OF LAMB WITH MINT PESTO, NEW POTATOES AND BABY CARROTS
1/3 cup walnuts
6 large garlic cloves
2 cups fresh mint leaves
1 cup fresh basil leaves
1/2 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or red wine vinegar
1 5- to 6-pound leg of lamb

2 pounds baby new potatoes, large ones halved
12 ounces baby carrots, trimmed, peeled

Fresh mint sprigs
Finely chop walnuts and garlic in processor. Add 2 cups mint leaves and basil and chop finely. Add oil and vinegar and blend until pesto is smooth. Cut excess fat from lamb, leaving thin layer. Set lamb in large roasting pan. Make several slits in lamb with tip of small sharp knife. Reserve 1/2 cup pesto for vegetables. Spoon some pesto into each slit; rub remainder into lamb. Sprinkle lamb generously with salt and pepper. Let stand 1 hour at room temperature or cover and chill overnight.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Roast lamb 45 minutes. Add potatoes to pan and turn to coat in pan juices. Roast 30 minutes. Add carrots and reserved 1/2 cup pesto and turn to coat carrots and potatoes in pesto and pan juices. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Continue roasting until thermometer inserted into thickest part of lamb registers 140°F. for medium-rare, about 45 minutes longer. Remove from oven and let stand 15 minutes.

Carve lamb into thin slices. Arrange on plates with potatoes and carrots. Garnish with fresh mint leaves.

Salad of New Red Potatoes

Chinese Cuisine, Susanna Foo

 

1 pound new red potatoes

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons corn oil

2 garlic cloves, finely minced

1 teaspoon coarse or kosher salt

1 jalapeno pepper seeded and julienned, or ½ teaspoon hot red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon chopped fresh peppermint or other mint leaves

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (optional)

 

Scrub the potatoes and cut into julienne.  As you cut, immediately place potatoes in a bowl filled with cold water and wash under cold running water to remove any excess starch.

Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil over high heat and blanch the potatoes for 2 minutes, just until they become transparent and lose their raw taste.

Drain the potatoes and place them in a colander.  Rinse under cold running water to stop the cooking.

Place the potatoes in a medium bowl and toss with the lemon juice; they should be crisp and white, set aside.

Heat the oil in  a small skillet.  Add the garlic and cook over high heat, stirring for 1 minutes.  Remove from the heat.  Add the salt and the jalapeno pepper or hot pepper flakes.  Stir to mix.

Spoon the garlic mixture over the potatoes and toss gently to combine.  Add the chopped mint, toss again and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or until ready to serve.  Sprinkle with balsamic vinegar, if using, over the potato salad just before serving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Week #7

 

  • Spinach or chard
  • Carrots or beets
  • Green onions
  • Sugar snap peas – we are happy to feature them this week and for the next few weeks as long as we don’t think about how many there could have been without the goat invasion.
  • Garlic – fresh heads, not cured yet, so their flavor is mild. Peel and chop as you normally would.
  • Cilantro, dill or parsley – the herbs are coming, they add spice to your life.
  • Kale – finally our friend has taken off, we have tons of it! Enjoy kale at every meal!!
  • Lettuce – we have moved on from salad mix to head lettuce, we have a lot! Wash carefully , spin dry and you will have salad all week. If you haven’t tried my salad dressing yet, now is your chance. We always come back to it as it takes any bitter edge off.
  • Kohlrabi or radish choose one

This has been a busy week trying to keep up with the weeds. Juve managed to whip some of the garden into shape as he tilled all the paths. The drizzle of rain gave everything a boost, especially the pig weed! The lettuce took off in a way we didn’t think possible. I plant lettuce every week, but it seems that it is all ready at once. Enjoy salad every day, I guess nature is telling you what you need at this time of year, green.

The tomatoes in the greenhouse have flowers and a few small fruits, hoping for a July start on tomatoes. The peppers inside and outside the hoop house are bulking up and seem to enjoy this weather as well. We got over 150 eggplant in the ground as well as all the outdoor tomatoes. We are officially out of space and have to wait for crops to finish before we can add more. Fall crops like broccoli and cauliflower will soon be seeded. The Brussels are already up and will be transplanted into the beds freed up by the garlic. CSA farming is never DONE, but is constantly a rotating work of art. Make sure to look out from the barn window this week, it really looks beautiful out there. If you have time, stroll into the field and see the broccoli, cabbage, lettuce and onions growing.

We had a big week of pizza parties. We fired up the oven for Jacob’s PSU sustainability club after they helped us with the harvest last Sunday. We also hosted the Liberty Girls Lacrosse team end of the season celebration on Thursday night.  Today we have an Indian feast. My first attempt at one of my favorite dishes, Chicken Tikka Masala. We will see how that turns out. We did roast goat last weekend and it was quite good. The curry was better than my barbacoa, who knew goat could be so tender. This week I will be busy arranging wedding flowers in addition to farming.

Next weekend is Memorial Day, we will harvest as usual on Sunday and we understand that some people who usually pick up on Monday may wait until Tuesday, that is fine. I had better stop chatting and get out there and harvest. We hope you are keeping up with the veggies, remember kale for breakfast is delicious! The crispy kale recipe takes care of the entire bunch and is eaten like an appetizer in our family.

Here is a recipe shared by new member and cooking enthusiast Pat Lando. He says he just whipped it up on Sunday(last week) and it was a hit with the whole family.

Braised Lentils with Spinach

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1-1/2 cups brown lentils
  • 1 small onions, diced
  • 1 medium carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 stalk celery, trimmed and diced
  • 1 bay leaves
  • Salt
  • 1/2 cup chicken stock or canned reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups finely shredded fresh spinach, thoroughly washed and drained

Preparation

    1. Pour enough cold water over the lentils, onions, carrots, celery, and bay leaves in a 3-quart saucepan to cover by three fingers. Season with salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Adjust the heat so the water is at a gentle boil and cook until the lentils are tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, discard the bay leaves, and transfer to a large skillet.
    2. Pour in the chicken stock and olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and cook until the liquid is reduced enough to coat the lentils, about 3 minutes. Scatter the spinach over the lentils and toss just until the spinach is wilted, about 1 minute. Taste and add salt and pepper if necessary. Serve immediately.

Notes

    1. I didn’t use chicken stock, but instead cooked ¾ lbs boneless, skinless chicken in the pan (with herbs) then deglazed the pan with white wine and added the lentils.
    2. I used all of the spinach stalks instead of the greens which turned out really well.

 

 

Roasted Beets w/ Feta

 

Directions

Peel 4 medium beets and cut into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste on a baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring once or twice, until tender, 35 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; toss with 4 chopped scallions and 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Top with crumbled feta.

Beet with Sesame Vinaigrette

 

1 pound beets (after cooking there should be about 2 cups)

6 tablespoons mild olive oil

2 teaspoons Oriental sesame oil

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons sesame seeds, additional for garnish

salt and pepper to taste

 

Trim tops from beets, leaving about ½ inch from the beets, so that they don’t bleed too much.  Put the beets in a pot and cover with cold water.  Heat to boiling, then reduce the heat and simmer uncovered until tender.  Pour off most of the hot water and add cold water to the pot.  Peel the beets while they are still warm.  Or you may rub the beets with a little oil and bake them in a covered pan at 350 until tender.  If the beets are large, cut them into ¼ inch slices.  If they are small, cut them into 4 – 8 wedges.  Place the beets in a large mixing bowl.

Whisk the remaining ingredients together, pour over the still warm beets, and toss to coat.  Sprinkle more sesame seeds if you like and serve.

 

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