Happy New Year!!

Happy New Years from your farmers at La Finquita del Buho. It is currently snowing and even seems to be sticking! The weather service says 1-3 inches. That amount is fine, but more than 4 inches can threaten our hoop houses. With both our boys back at college, we have less hands on deck to deal with a weather emergency. It looks like by 7 pm it will start to melt.

We are still getting seed orders filled out and strategizing about the 2016 season. By the end of the month it is time to seed onions, peas, and all sorts of other winter harder greens. This is really my last weekend to “play” as I set out the schedule for the remaining weeks of winter. We did manage to leave our farm for 6 days on a trip to sunny southern California. We played at the San Diego Zoo and Wild Animal Park. We dove into the 60 degree Del Mar Ocean and enjoyed walks in the many botanical gardens at Balboa Park. We missed our veggies and grass fed beef and the amazing foodie scene here in Portland. We did have all sorts of tacos and margueritas without finding a truly super location. The best thing was to spend time as a family and time with our good friends Walter, Susan and Elias.

I just updated the website with dates for start and finish of the season. I adjusted prices to account for the ever escalating price of seeds, soil amendments and organic pest protection. We look forward to improving what we offer and trying new varieties of old favorites. We appreciated the input from subscribers about what went well and what we could change. Some of the suggestions will guide us as we map out this coming season. In order for us to plan for the future we need to know if you are in or out for 2016. We require a deposit of $100 to reserve your spot. You can choose to pay in full or pay as you go. We have broken it down as usual:

  • $100 deposit due on sign –up
  • $390 due by May 1
  • $390 due by August 1
  • $880 for the season, $860 if you pay in full by April 15th.
  • Send enrollment form and your deposit to: La Finquita del Buho 7960 NW Dick Road, Hillsboro, OR 97124

You are welcome to find a share partner and alternate weeks or share each week’s bounty. Please do let us know who you are sharing with, so they are included on the email list and sign-in sheet. If you don’t have a partner just let me know and I will match you up with one. I am hopeful that Ana will once again organize a pick-up plan for Portland folks who want to travel out here once a month and not once week or once every other week. Let me know if you are interested and we will start organizing. Suggestions for how to make that system work better are always appreciated.

We hope you all enjoy this last half day of winter break and find a few minutes to get outside and play in the snow! We look forward to growing your vegetables in 2016

 

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Thanksgiving Harvest 2015

  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Radiccho
  • Daikon Radish
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Shallots
  • Garlic
  • Winter Squash
  • Pie Pumpkins (don’t throw out the seeds! They are delicious slow roasted with a bit of season salt or paprika)
  • green peppers
  • hot peppers
  • green tomatoes
  • beets or carrots
  • Parsley
  • Kohlrabi (giant, yet tender, use peeled, sliced and eaten raw or sauté or shred in a slaw)
  • walnuts

We have been gathering the harvest little by little all week long. As we watch the weather and try to beat the deep freeze. We managed to get the tomatoes, peppers, parsley and kohlrabi before it went down to 30 degrees. The tomato bushes are all black today, a sign that they got really cold. Most of the peppers left on the plants are wilted and turning black as they were frost bitten. We have left crops that like a cold snap to encourage their sugars to flow: kale, Brussels sprouts and celeriac for harvest today. I just stepped out and it is about 27 degrees, too cold to harvest yet.

This whole week promises to be cold and crisp, nice weather for cooking and planning for a nice Thanksgiving meal. We got the idea of having our family celebration in the barn from some of our customers. I got carried away with the romance of the barn and ordered space heaters, lights and made garland. Then I spent one late afternoon in the barn when it got to 40 degree, my toes went numb and the romance faded. I thought of my father and mother in down coats carrying plates of steaming stuffing and turkey and abandoned the idea. We will all cram inside our house, and make our way through the buffet laid out in our tight kitchen. We will be warm and cozy and we’ll want to linger into the night.

Your farmers are settling in for the winter. We have planted the garlic, tulip bulbs and some of the cover crop. Just as we sit down to catch our breath the seed catalogs will start arriving, tempting me into another season of new varieties, sweeter carrots, more prolific squash and cucumber beetle resistant beans! We want to thank all of our members for sticking it out with us this season. There are always challenges in farming, we fully expect those challenges to increase as our climate changes and the pressure of new diseases , hotter weather and never dying pests continues. We hope to adapt with those changes, we hope you will join us for the challenge.

We are taking deposits for the 2016 season. We always have room for our returning members. We will have room for your friends and family who want to become part of La Finquita CSA. Please do have them contact us sooner rather than later. The best way is to send us a deposit check for $100 to ensure  membership for 2016. We appreciated the feedback many of you provided to us since the end of the regular season. You are welcome to send your comments to us now if you missed out last month. The comments help us contemplate doing things differently; will we dedicate space and water to growing corn? Will we look for a smaller romanesco so we can plant more of it? Will we get the timing right for Brussels Sprouts to produce during the regular season?

The four questions are:

1) What was your favorite part of being a member of La Finquita del Buho?

2) What vegetable would you like to see more of?

3) If you could change one (or more things) about your farm share, what would that be?

4) Will you continue your membership in 2016?

 

Feel free to send us your responses. There is plenty of time for us to think about how next season will look and what we will plant, we have until January to start planting!

 

Please check out the wreath shop! We have wreaths, bird feeders and a whole new selection of ceramics! I am happy to take orders holiday gifts, mugs, matching bowls, bird houses! We will be serving treats and tea and coffee the day after Thanksgiving if you come out to harvest your holiday tree or to wine taste stop in and say “Hi”.

 

We wish you all a thoughtful holiday season as we face the challenges of  a very complex world. Thank you for your support of our effort to grow delicious food and sustain our community. You are making a difference.

Brussels Sprout Leaves with Bacon (or Pancetta)

 

Cut the stems and separate the sprouts into leaves.  Thinly slice the tightly compact centers.  Saute some diced onion and pancetta or bacon in olive oil unitil softened.  Add the sprout leaves, season with salt and moisten with a little white wine and water of chicken stock.  Cover and simmer for 10 to15 minutes, until tender.  Taste for seasoning, grind in black pepper and serve.

Butternut Shrimp Bisque

Frank Brigtsen, Brigtsen’s Resturaunt

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 cups diced yellow onion
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 cups butternut squash (peeled, de-seeded, and diced into ½ – inch cubes)
  • 2 cups peeled fresh shrimp
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons salt
  • 3/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • ½ cup shrimp stock (see NOTE)
  • 6 cups heavy whipping cream

NOTE: To make shrimp stock, place shrimp heads and shells into a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain.

  1. Heat the butter in a heavy-duty saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and bay leaf and cook, stirring constantly, until the onions become soft and clear, 3-4 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to medium and add the butternut squash. Cook this mixture, stirring occasionally, until the squash begins to soften, 6-8 minutes.
  3. Reduce heat to low and add the shrimp, salt, cayenne, and white pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp turn pink, 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the shrimp stock and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6-8 minutes. If the mixture begins to stick to the pan, scrape it with a spoon and continue cooking. This will intensify the flavor of the bisque.
  5. Remove bay leaf and discard. Transfer the squash/shrimp mixture to a food processor and puree. Return the puree to a saucepan and add the cream. Whisk until thoroughly blended. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 2-3 minutes.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces
1 1/4 cups flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons cinnamon
½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt
1 1/3 cup half and half
4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

Brussels Sprouts With Ginger and Mustard Seeds
from Alice Waters of Chez Panisse

5 tablespoons light olive oil
1 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed until all leaves are torn off
Salt
2 tablespoons chopped ginger
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1 teaspoon hot red pepper
1 lime

  1. Heat sauté pan over high heat. Add oil and brussels sprout leaves, and season with salt.
  2. Toss and brown until tender. Add ginger, mustard seeds and hot red pepper. Toss and cook for a minute more. Simmer until completely tender, 1 to 3 minutes.
  3. Add the juice of half a lime. Taste and adjust salt and lime. Serve.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Browned Onions from Chef Jonathan Miller
Everyone loves brussels sprouts with bacon. Here’s a version from Marquita farm:

1 stalk  Brussels sprouts
olive oil
1/4 pound bacon
1 large onion

Heat the oven to 425. Strip the Brussels sprouts off the stalk. Halve the Brussels sprouts lengthwise. Toss with a few tablespoons olive oil and some salt directly on a sheet pan. Peel your onions and slice them in half, then thinly crosswise. Slice the bacon into half inch pieces.

Roast the sprouts in the oven until lightly colored and crispy on their edges, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven.
Heat a large skillet and cook the bacon until crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and pour off all but a couple tablespoons of the fat. Add the sliced onions to the bacon fat in the skillet and sauté briskly until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir regularly to make sure they brown evenly. Remove from heat.

Combine the browned onions with the Brussels sprouts and the crisped bacon. Taste to make sure you like it, adjusting seasonings as necessary.

Julia’s Perfect Pumpkin Pie

First the pumpkin:

Preheat oven to 350. Cut and remove seeds from one medium sugar pie pumpkin, or 2 small ones. Bake in glass dish cut side down for at least 45 minutes, or until a fork easily pierces the entire wall of the pumpkin.

Remove from oven and let cool.

Next the crust:

For best results use a 9 inch pie plate and have foil and beans or pie weights available

4 tablespoons EACH cold unsalted butter and shortening, cut into pieces

1 1/4 cups flour

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons sugar

3-6 tablespoons ice cold water

In a food processor, whirl the dry ingredients together, then drop the butter and shortening pieces into the processor and pulse a few times until the mixture looks crumbly and there are no lumps larger than peas.

Mix above mixture in a mixing bowl with 3 tablespoons of the cold water. Add water a ½ tablespoon at a time and mix until the dough is pliable and releases from the sides, but isn’t too sticky. After 3 Tablespoons or so it’s easiest to use your hands to bring the crumbs into a dough. Don’t wash the food processor yet.

Refrigerate in waxed paper as a thick disk for at least ½ an hour while you prepare the filling. After about 30 minutes, roll out dough until it’s about 13 inches in diameter. Fold it over, and place into a 10 inch pie plate. Trim edge to about ½ an inch beyond the end of the pie plate, tuck in crust and pinch the edge into a design. Lightly place some aluminum foil or parchment paper onto crust, then put in some pie weights to cover the bottom (or dried beans) This step helps to make the perfect pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

FILLING:

2 cups pumpkin puree

1 cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground ginger

2 teaspoons cinnamon

½ teaspoon each ground cloves and nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

1 1/3 cup half and half

4 large eggs

In the bowl of the food processor, remove any large clumps from the making of the crust, and add the pulp from the pumpkins, discarding the skin and any renegade seeds. Whirl the pumpkin until thoroughly pureed. Measure out 2 cups of the pumpkin, and reserve the rest for another use. (See soup recipe or add about a cup to any pancake or cookie recipe.)

In the bowl of the food processor, mix the pumpkin with the spices and the brown sugar. Remove to a saucepan, and heat until it’s lightly bubbling. In the bowl of the food processor, whirl the eggs with the half and half until mixed, then add gently to the warm pumpkin mixture. Cook for 2 or 3 more minutes, stirring a few times. Pour warm pumpkin mixture into the warm pie shell, and bake for about 25 minutes, or until center is still slightly wobbly. Cool on a rack for at least an hour. Enjoy with whipped cream or ice cream.

FRESH PUMPKIN BREAD

(From Reminisce, Nov1991)

 

3 1/2 all purpose flour

2 t baking soda

1 t salt

1 t each ground cinnamon and nutmeg

2 c sugar

1 c vegetable oil

4 eggs, beaten

1 t each vanilla extract

¾ cup buttermilk

1 cup raisins (optional)

1 cup walnuts, chopped

2 cups fresh pumpkin

 

  1. Mix all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl
  2. Add eggs, oil, buttermilk, and sugar, mix well (I beat with a wisk)
  3. Add pumpkin, vanilla, raisins and walnuts
  4. Pour into two greased 9″ x 5″ loaf pans.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 60-65 minutes or until bread tests done.
  6. Let stand 10 minutes before removing from pans. Then cool on a wire rack.
  7. Can be served fresh or frozen

 Kale Salad

 

Flax oil (1/8 C)

Lemon juice (1/8 C)

Soy sauce* (less than 1/8 C)

1 bunch kale

Red onion

Shredded or shaved (with peeler) carrots

¼ C pumpkin seeds

1/8 C sunflower seeds

Sesame seeds

Sprouts (any kind)

Mushrooms (optional)

* can use Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce

1) Make the dressing:  equal parts flax oil, lemon juice & soy sauce (or Bragg’s – a low sodium substitute for soy sauce.  Use less soy sauce if sensitive.)

Marinate very thinly sliced / shaved red onion in the dressing while you prepare the kale.

2) De-stem the kale – try to get the young, tender smaller leaves.

Cut it into ribbons.  Place in very large bowl to allow for easy mixing.

Add rest of “dry” ingredients.

3) Add the dressing and marinated onions to the kale mixture.  Using hands, gently massage the dressing into the kale; softening down the structure of the kale and aiding the absorption of the dressing by the kale.

Let sit for a while (20-30 mins) before serving.  Can be made well beforehand and refrigerated.  Can add chopped avocado when serving.  Goes well with marinated tofu-you can use the same dressing.

 

 

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Last Harvest 2015

 

Week #29

  • Napa Cabbage or green cabbage
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Stuffing peppers
  • Kale or chard
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes (slightly green, they will ripen and they make great green tomatoes or green tomato pie)
  • Green onions or leeks
  • Onions
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower (look at these beauties! They are super roasted or in soup)
  • Garlic
  • Winter squash
  • Brussels sprouts (still tiny, but a teaser for the Thanksgiving Harvest)
  • Dill or parsley
  • Small edible pumpkin or decorative gourds

We are finally here, the end of the 2015 season. The harvest festival last week turned out to be a smash hit. The morning was rainy and dreary. The texts started to come about 9:00 am, “is the harvest festival still on?” and of course my reply, “the show must go on, rain or shine”.  As the afternoon progressed the clouds parted and we actually had sun for the afternoon kick off of the 2015 festival. The alp horns played there mournful tones. The Sheridan High School Taiko drummers mesmerized the crowd. “Mexico en la piel” danced for us with new and different costumes. The afternoon culminated with the sweet sound of the blue grass Finquita singers.

One of the very best things for us was to have our whole family here with us. Diego came home for the first time after setting off to study at OSU and that meant so much to us to have him come back for our farm celebration. Jacob also came home for the whole weekend to help out.  Luna helped with harvest and set up for the event.It was great to be together to put on this culminating event.

Mary Kay and Mark worked the pizza making station and allowed Juve and I to circulate and enjoy the festival. There were many more helpers that I want to mention, but do not in fear of leaving someone out. Needless to say we appreciate you all and know that this would not be possible without the many hands that make this farm provide for our community. The walnut pick-up competition yielded about 100# of walnuts about 1/6th of the nuts that are on the ground. The cider press was used to make quarts of cider from apples from orchard. I think everyone had a good time at the celebration of the farm and the bounty of the land.

We enjoyed having Kate and Jessica, producer and cinematographer of the PBS documentary on the changing face of medicine. They first interviewed me in April in my day job as a family physician at Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center. I invited them to see my other job (La Finquita) and film life on the farm and our celebration of the fall harvest. I think they got a real picture of the community we have created and they had fun as well. The documentary will be aired this spring on OPB , we’ll keep you posted.

The pumpkin patch is still open, plenty of carvers remain for the choosing. We have room for those who want to sign up for the Thanksgiving Harvest. We will have a wide selection of fall veggies for you that will likely keep for weeks, so even if you plan to travel for the holiday it will store well for your return.

Please take the time to answer our four questions:

1) What was your favorite part of being a member of La Finquita del Buho?

2) What vegetable would you like to see more of?

3) If you could change one (or more things) about your farm share, what would that be?

4) Will you continue your membership in 2016?

 

It is time to let us know about 2016. We will have space for you returning members and for new members!  Send us an email (lynjuve@msn.com) or send us your deposit of $100 (non-refundable) to :

La Finquita del Buho

7960 NW Dick Road

Hillsboro, OR 97124

We look forward to seeing you later in the fall and next spring! Stay in touch, we will hibernate a bit but before long we will be ordering seeds and starting them in our hoop house. Thank you for a great season.

CAULIFLOWER GRATIN WITH GRUYERE AND HAZELNUTS
1 medium cauliflower
Salt and freshly ground pepper
½ cup crème fraiche (see note)
¾ c. shredded gruyere cheese
3 Tbsp. bread crumbs
3 Tbsp. hazelnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp. flat parsley for garnish

Butter a 2-quart baking dish or gratin pan. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cut cauliflower into small florets. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt generously. Add cauliflower florets to pot and cook until tender, but not mushy, about 5 minutes. Drain florets and pat dry with a kitchen towel. Toss cauliflower with crème fraiche and half the cheese in the prepared baking dish. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle remaining cheese over cauliflower, then top with bread crumbs and hazelnuts. Bake on center rack until cheese has melted and bread crumbs and nuts are golden, 20-25 minutes or more. Garnish with parsley. Serves 5 or 6. Note: you can make crème fraiche by whisking 1 cup whipping cream with 1/3 c. sour cream in a nonreactive bowl. Let stand at room temperature until thickened, 6 hours or longer; then cover and refrigerate. Makes about 1 1/3 cups. From Foodday.

RADICCHIO SALAD WITH SPANISH BLUE CHEESE AND PEPPERED ALMONDS
1 head butter lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
1 head radicchio, torn into bite-size pieces
8 ounces blue cheese (preferably Cabrales), crumbled
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
5 tablespoons almond oil or olive oil
Peppered Almonds
Combine lettuce, radicchio and cheese in large bowl. Pour vinegar into small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil. Toss lettuce mixture with vinaigrette. Season salad with salt and pepper. Sprinkle Peppered Almonds over and serve immediately.
Bon Appétit
March 2000
Asian Cabbage salad with Chicken
• 1 red jalapeño or Fresno chile with some seeds, chopped
• 1/3 cup vegetable oil
• 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
• 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
• 2 teaspoons light brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon fish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam)
• 1 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
• Kosher salt
• 1/2 small head of red cabbage, thinly sliced (about 5 cups)
• 2 medium carrots, peeled, shredded
• 6 scallions, whites and pale greens only, thinly sliced
• 3 cups shredded rotisserie chicken
• 1 cup baby spinach, thinly sliced
• 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
• 1/4 cup chopped dry-roasted peanuts
• 1/2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
Preparation: Whisk chile, oil, lime juice, soy sauce, brown sugar, fish sauce, and ginger in a large bowl; season with salt. Add cabbage, carrots, scallions, chicken, spinach, and cilantro; toss to coat. Top with peanuts and sesame seeds.

Kim Chee (use for Napa Cabbage, Daikon and other vegetables)
This is a general kim chee recipe, adaptable to any vegetable, sent to us by our friend Daniel, who did an internship at the Cultured Pickle in the Bay Area. While these instructions are for turnip, cauliflower and carrot, the method works for any combination of vegetable.
-Shredded pickles: this is essentially the same method for sauerkraut but it works really well with root vegetables. Basically you shred the vegetables (with a food processor is easiest) and then salt them. The salt draws moisture out of the veggies creating a brine. Here are step-by-step instructions for this method.
1. Wash the roots and cauliflower and trim off any soft spots
2. Weigh all the veggies and record the weight
3. Calculate anywhere from 1.5 – 2% of the vegetable weight and weigh out that much salt.
4. Shred the root vegetables and cut the cauliflower into small pieces combining all in a giant bowl as you go.
5. Thoroughly mix the shredded roots and cauliflower with the salt (you can add any spices, chopped garlic, shredded ginger, minced anchovies, herbs or citrus zests that you want at this point. Be aware that garlic flavor tends to bloom and get stronger during the pickling process).
6. Let the mixture sit for a couple of hours and see how the liquid is drawn from the vegetables.
7. Pack the vegetables with their liquid into a crock or as many gallon glass jars as it takes to hold them. Try to press out as much air as you can and leave some head room because the fermentation will bubble up.
8. Put some sort of cover on the surface of the veggies and a weight on top of the cover to keep them pressed under their liquid. I like to use the outer leaves from a head of cabbage folded as needed to cover the shredded vegetables with a gallon jug of water as weight.
9. Let the jars ferment for anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks. It should be in a corner somewhere with a temp around 60-65 degrees Fahrenheit. Taste it as it goes. Push it back down every once in a while. Skim off any mold or white yeast blooms that show up on the surface (they are not harmful, don’t worry).
10. When the flavor has gotten sour enough for you, pack the pickles into jars in the fridge to stop them changing further, or move them to a cool root cellar. (If you want the pickles to be stable for months and years at above refrigeration temperature, you can up the salt percentage to near 3%.

-Whole Brined pickles: these are very easy and quick and take less shredding.
1. Wash and trim the vegetables
2. Cut the cauliflower into florets and if the roots are large I would cut them into about two-inch chunks.
3. Make a brine: measure out enough water that you will be able to cover all the prepared vegetables in your crock or gallon jars. Then dissolve in this water 50 percent of its weight in salt. For example, 1 liter of water gets 50 grams of salt, 6 liters gets 300 grams of salt. Also add any flavoring to the brine like flowering dill and smashed heads of garlic. I like to add a bunch of dried chiles. Chile flakes and ground spices are good too. You can also heat the brine to dissolve the salt and add the spices like a tea for more flavor, just make sure it has cooled completely before the next step.
4. Put all the prepped vegetables in your fermentation container and pour the brine over to cover them completely.
5. Again put some sort of cover with a weight to keep the vegetables from coming to the surface.
6. Let them ferment for at least two weeks. Check them as they go.
7. Refrigerate to stop the process or put in a cool place to slow it down.

Kohlrabi and Chicken Stew
Posted by Seth Just – June 1st, 2011
• 3-4 lb. Chicken
• 2 lb. kohlrabi/broccoli stems
• 3/4 lb. Carrots
• 4 Tb butter
• 4 cups sliced onions
• 1 cup peeled, chopped tomatoes
• 2 tsp salt
• 1 tsp black pepper
• pinch saffron threads
• 1/4 tsp turmeric
• 1/2 tsp cinnamon
• 2 tsp ground coriander
• 1 quart chicken broth or water
• 4 sprigs parsley
• 1/2 small cabbage
Cut chicken into serving pieces. Peel kohlrabis and/or broccoli stems; cut larger ones into 1-inch chunks. Cut cabbage into 1/4-inch strips. Peel carrots and slice diagonally into 1/2-inch thick pieces.
In a large saucepan, heat the butter and sauté the onions, tomatoes, salt and spices for 4-5 minutes. Add the chicken and cook for 5 minutes. Add the broth or water and parsley. Bring the broth to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the kohlrabis and carrots, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Finally, add the cabbage and simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes longer or until all the vegetables are completely tender.
Adapted from The Victory Garden Cookbook by Marian Morash

 

Celeriac Recipes

Celeriac and Tomato Soup

4 tomatoes                            2 cups water

2 # celeriac                            ¼ cup lovage chopped (optional)

3  leeks                                   1 onion

1 clove garlic                        1 large carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil         2 T butter

3 sprigs parsley                    6 cups chicken broth

salt and freshly ground pepper

Peel, seed, and roughly chop tomatoes.  Peel sufficient celeriac to make 1 ½ pounds trimmed flesh, then cut into ½ inch cubes and drop into acidulated water.  Wash and trim leeks and, using only the white and light green parts, thinly slice.  You should have 1 ½ cups.  Chop onion and combine with leeks.  Chop garlic.  Thinly slice carrot. Heat together oil and butter and sauté leeks and onion until wilted.  Add garlic and carrot, and cook for 5 minutes longer,  Add one third of the tomatoes and cook until they are lightly browned on the edges and the juice is evaporated.  Add drained celeriac, the rest to the tomatoes and the parsley sprig.  Cook together for 10 minutes.  Add chicken broth, water and lovage (if using).  Bring to a boil and reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Puree, season with salt and pepper, and serve with croutons on the side.  (serves 8)  For thinner soup only use 1 pound celeriac and 3 tomatoes.

CELERY ROOT BISQUE WITH THYME CROUTONS
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup coarsely chopped shallots (about 3 large)
2 pounds celery roots (celeriac), peeled, woody parts trimmed and discarded, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 5 1/2 cups)
1 10-ounce russet potato, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
5 cups low-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme

1/4 cup whipping cream
Additional chopped fresh thyme
Melt butter in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add celery; cover and cook until slightly softened, about 3 minutes. Add shallots; sauté uncovered 3 minutes. Stir in celery root cubes and potato, then broth and 1 1/2 teaspoons thyme. Increase heat to high; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 40 minutes. Cool slightly.

Working in batches, transfer soup to blender and puree until smooth. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead. Cool slightly. Cover and refrigerate.)

Stir cream into soup and bring to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Sprinkle with additional chopped thyme and serve.

Bon Appétit
November 2005

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson

Serves 6-8

  • 3 T unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 12 whole curry leaves (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped this)
  • pinch freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.

Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.

Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.

Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE AND GINGER SHRIMP
24 large shrimp in shell (about 1 lb), peeled, leaving tail and first segment of shell intact, and deveined
1 tablespoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2/3 cup chopped shallot
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 3/4 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (5 cups)
4 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs
Toss shrimp with ginger in a bowl and marinate, chilled, 30 minutes (do not marinate any longer or enzymes from ginger will begin to cook shrimp).

Make soup while shrimp marinate: 
Cook shallot, garlic, and anise in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until shallot is softened, about 5 minutes. Add squash, stock, and water and simmer, uncovered, until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove star anise.

Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) until very smooth, about 1 minute per batch, then transfer to cleaned pan and keep warm, covered.

Sprinkle marinated shrimp with salt. Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté shrimp in 2 batches, stirring, until just cooked through, about 3 minutes per batch, transferring to paper towels.

Bring soup to a simmer and season with salt and pepper. Divide among 8 shallow soup bowls and mound 3 shrimp in each bowl.

Cooks’ note: 
. Soup (without shrimp) can be made 3 days ahead and chilled, covered. If making soup ahead, begin marinating shrimp about 40 minutes before serving.

Gourmet
December 2002

DELICATA SQUASH WITH ROSEMARY, SAGE, AND CIDER GLAZE

This is my favorite way to cook winter squash. You peel, and slice it, then cook it in a skillet with cider and
winter herbs. When most of the liquid boils away, the cider forms a tart-sweet glaze around the now-tender squash.

Delicata is a wonderfully firm-textured squash that’s not too sweet and almost like a potato. Other varieties like
acorn, turban, or kabocha will make good substitutes, but they may not hold their shape quite as well through the
braising.

2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm
winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice
1 cup water
2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.
  2. Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook,
    stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.
  3. Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender,
    20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

Roasted Winter Roots with Whole Garlic Heads
From The San Francisco Chronicle Cookbook

All vegetables may be cooked in the oven at the same time. The heads
of garlic, roasted alongside the vegetables, become a self-contained
spread that is delicious on country-style bread. Be sure to allow one
garlic head for each person.

4 carrots, about ½ pound total
2 parsnips, about ½ pound total
2 turnips, about 1 pound total
1 rutabaga, about 1 pound
2 yellow onions, about ¾ pound total
3 russet potatoes, about 1 ¾ pounds total
4 heads of garlic, about ½ pound total
1/3 C olive oil
1 ½ tsps salt
1Tbles freshly ground pepper
4 fresh thyme sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh rosemary sprigs, or 1 tsp dried
4 fresh sage sprigs, or 1 tsp dried

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Peel the carrots, parsnips, turnips and rutabaga. Cut the
carrots into 2 inch lengths. Halve the parsnips crosswise, separating
the tapering root end from the thick upper portion. Cut the upper
portion lengthwise into 2 pieces. Quarter the turnips and rutabaga.
Peel the onions but do not cut off the root ends. Quarter the onions
lengthwise.
Scrub the potatoes and cut them lengthwise into quarters, then
in half. Cut off the upper quarter of the garlic heads, leaving the
heads intact, skin and all.
Combine half of the olive oil, the salt, pepper, thyme,
rosemary and sage in a large bowl. Add all of the vegetables,
including the garlic. Stir them until they are well coated with the
seasoned oil.
Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on 2 baking sheets.
Roast for 30 minutes. Stir the vegetables and baste with some of the
remaining olive oil. Continue roasting, stirring once or twice and
basting with olive oil, for 30 to 45 minutes longer, or until all the
vegetables are tender and are easily pierced with a fork. Remove from
the oven and transfer to a platter.
Serve hot or at room temperature. Serves 4

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Week #28 – Harvest Festival Today!!

Week #28/29

The Weekly Share

  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio
  • Sweet peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Kale or chard
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatillos
  • Tomatoes (enjoy them while you can!!)
  • Green onions
  • Yellow onions
  • Parsley
  • Celery or celeriac (the brown ugly root makes for great soup or roasting)
  • Winter squash

The harvest festival is scheduled for later today. It is currently raining, which I am trying not to get down about. I keep reminding myself that I can’t change a thing by worrying, so I will just keep hoping for it to blow past the farm. The show will go on, rain or shine. We celebrate our farm’s 16th year, our barn’s 100th birthday and my sister’s birthday too! Quite a few things to be thankful for, even in the turbulent world.

We expect to see many of you later today for pizza making, cider pressing, pony rides and much more. We kick off the party with the Helvetia Alp Horns. The Taiko drummers are next, a new addition to our afternoon line-up. “Mexico en la Piel” will join us once again with splendid dancing and remarkable skill. Our afternoon will be punctuated by the walnut gathering competition, a farm tour and the blue grass jam session.

Please do check out the pumpkin patch, the show room with wreaths, birdfeeders, finquita t-shirts, artist prints and handmade soap.

I want to keep writing, but my adobado is waiting! Enjoy your veggies and don’t forget to sign-up for Thanksgiving share. Next week is the last week of the regular season!

Celery Root and Apple Salad with Toasted Walnuts 
serves 4 to 6

2 medium celery roots, peeled and cut into matchsticks
2 medium red delicious apples, cored and cut into matchsticks
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 green onions, thinly sliced
1 bunch watercress leaves

dressing:

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon mustard seed
1 tablespoon mustard
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 cup vegetable oil
salt and pepper
1 cup walnut halves, toasted

Combine the celery root and apple in a bowl and sprinkle with lemon juice. Toss with the green onion and watercress. Whisk the vinegar, mustard seed, mustard, honey and oil until well combined. Toss with the celery root mixture. Taste for salt and pepper and garnish with walnuts.

Celeriac Soup

Ingredients

  • small splasholive oil, plus a drizzle to serve
  • 100g slicedpancetta
  • small knob butter
  • 1 largeonion, chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • large bunchthyme, leaves picked and set aside
  • 1celeriac, cut into chunks
  • 850ml freshchicken stock
  • 100ml double cream

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a large pan. Sizzle thepancettafor about 3 mins on each side until crisp, then remove to a plate and set aside. Melt the butter in the same pan, add the onion, bay leaf and thyme stalks, and cook for 10 mins until just starting to turn golden. Add theceleriac and cook for 2 mins more.
  2. Pour over the stock and simmer for 10 mins until the celeriac is soft. Stir in the cream and bring back to the boil. Fish out the bay and thyme stalks, then purée the soup until smooth. Stir through half the thyme leaves and ladle the soup into bowls. Serve topped with the crispy pancetta, the remaining thyme leaves and a drizzle of olive oil.

 

Squash Stew with Cauliflower and Tomatoes from Chef Jonathan Miller

onions, chopped
garlic cloves, chopped
2 tsp. cumin, ground
2 TBL dry oregano, toasted
2 TBL chili powder
2 lb hard squash, peeled and diced
8 oz mushrooms, cut into bite sized pieces
1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
3 TBL sesame seeds, toasted
small handful of almonds, toasted
2 lb tomatoes, crushed or pureed
1 cup frozen peas
small handful cilantro, chopped

Heat some olive oil in a large saucepan or soup pot. Add the onions and sauté until they have softened, about 8-10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, oregano, and the chili powder and cook another couple minutes. Add the squash, mushrooms, some salt, and 3 cups of water or vegetable stock. Bring to a boil, cover, lower heat and simmer slowly until the squash is tender, about 20 minutes. Stir regularly so the mixture doesn’t char on the bottom of the pot. Run almonds and sesame seeds in a food processor for a few seconds to finely chop them, then add to the stew with the cauliflower and tomatoes. Cook until the cauliflower is done to your liking, at least

Pumpkin or Winter Squash Puree
Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone Deborah Madison

Easy, versatile and useful, leftovers can fill ravioli, turn into a soup, or be added to muffins, breads, biscuits, and waffles. Preheat oven to 375 F. Halve, seed, and bake 3 pounds pumpkin or winter squash until tender, approx. 30 – 40 mins. Scrape the flesh away from the skin, then beat until smooth with a large wooden spoon This should be easy unless the squash is stringy, in which case, use a food processor or food mill. Stir in butter to taste and season with salt and pepper. Makes about 2 cups. To enrich the puree, grate Gruyére , Fountain, or Emmenthaler into it. Flavor with extra virgin olive oil, or dark sesame oil, or mix in sautéed onions.

 

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Week #27

  • Beets
  • Fennel
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Tomatoes or cherry tomatoes (they are winding down and the flavor is much less intense, time to add to soups!)
  • Peppers (green, red and stuffing)
  • Hot peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Beans
  • Dill
  • Broccoli or cauliflower or cabbage
  • Kohlrabi or radish
  • Carrots (the rainbow is here!)
  • Celeriac
  • Winter squash (quite the haul this year, you can expect quite a lot for the next three weeks and in the Thanksgiving share)

We had quite the monsoon wind yesterday with a torrential down pour around 2:30. We were so lucky it struck after we finished the farmers market or we could have been in real trouble. Even with the scare of bad weather the market went fairly well. We are in the fall wreath season so I have been busy in my studio creating new work on an almost daily basis. I will have fresh fall wreaths and birdfeeders available for purchase at the Harvest Festival.

We had a bumper crop of winter squash and pumpkins this year. We will have beautiful pie pumpkins for the Thanksgiving harvest (November 22,23) as well as the traditional acorn squash for the holiday. We hope to have Brussels by then, they are taking their sweet time ripening and the aphids are a constant battle. Sign-up and prepay starting today. We have room for 50 shares. We hope to have at least 20 items for you and your family to enjoy.

We are working on our very own pumpkin patch for our subscribers and for the harvest festival next Sunday. Please do visit the pumpkins in the hidden garden just behind our house. We have pumpkins of all shapes and sizes, huge stems, pink ones and tiny white ones. Priced as marked between $1- $10.

We are getting ready for the big event on October 18th. We have many different performers in the line up. The Helvetia Alp Horns will open the afternoon around 2:30 so get here early. We have Taiko drummers (new addition!)Thank you Maddie Bisgyer) to follow. They are a talented group from Sheridan Japanese School who will dazzle your eyes and ears with their performance.” Mexico en la Piel” will dance for us once again, keeping the  tradition alive. Our very own members will round out the afternoon with the bluegrass jam session. If you play music and want to join in please do contact us (or just bring your instrument and see how it goes.

The harvest festival is really a chance for all of us to enjoy the fall, appreciate the access we have to fresh food grown right here in the Willamette Valley, and mingle with old and meet new friends. Please see the flyer in last week’s post for a list of what to bring, mostly just remember to bring yourself and a pot luck dish and you are good to go.

We will finish out our season the last week of October. We will have a brief survey sent out and hope to get your feedback about what you liked and what we can improve. This is really a labor of love. We love vegetables and we love our community and want to provide the freshest and best vegetables possible. We want to bring people together and we want to share our love of the earth with all of you. We can’t do it without your help, and in some ways that what makes our farm unique. We ask for members to get their hands dirty, to help us bring in the harvest twice over the course of the 29 week season. So, you have 4 harvests left, sign-up today. We have our Wednesday helpers (a great crew that always sends at least two members from Ann, Catherine, Jean, Bob, Eldon, Marianne, Makaela), thank you, thank you. Sundays we used to have our kids, now we have Luna on occasion and we need YOU. The harvests are huge and cumbersome, so lend a hand.

Ben, one of our members took this great short video of the canning party so check it out, it may motivate you to join us next year (likely in August) https://youtu.be/GOvD2D6l1gs.

Now, off to paint signs and get that harvest in!

Check out this recipe sent to you from Sue Kass:

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/12159-leek-and-cardamom-fritters?utm_source=sharetools&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=website

 

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Week #26

 

  • Lettuce
  • Radishes (giant purple daikon or “Pink Beauty” radish)
  • Leeks
  • Winter squash
  • Peppers
  • Hot peppers
  • Tomatoes (some green and some red)
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Kale or chard
  • Dill or cilantro
  • Parsley
  • Broccoli or cabbage
  • Beets
  • Tomatillos
  • Eggplant
  • Yellow apples (brought to us by Roy and Corrine, enjoy while they last)
  • Brussels Sprouts tops (like collards, tender and sweet, remove the thick stem)

 

Here we are the beginning of October, the final month of our harvest for 2015. It is a race to the end. We are rapidly turning over beds, once the crop is harvested, Juvencio tills the ground and seeds the cover crop. We are putting in Crimson clover and Phacelia(a hairy leaved, purple flowered plant that bees love) to nourish the soil and beat out the weed seed.

We are harvesting the winter squash today with the help of the FMIG (Family Medicine Interest Group) students from OHSU. It looks like a bumper crop, but we will post the pictures once the harvest is finished. We hope to have pumpkins for sale at the harvest festival. The orange globes are visible among the dying vines, I can’t wait to put them see them all together!

We will have our Thanksgiving harvest once again. Pick-up is November 21/22 and the harvest includes all the fall veggies we have available and hopefully beautiful Brussels sprouts. We will have pie pumpkins as well as other veggies. Sign-up and pay early to reserve your spot. Remember to sign-up to help harvest if you can. We have 7 more harvests and need you to lend a hand.

We will continue to harvest for the entire month of October although our harvest festival is October 18th. Please spread the word that the party is on! Our barn turns 100 this year and we celebrate 16 years of harvesting veggies for the community. Please plan on attending .

La Finquita Del Buho presents:

The 16th Annual

Harvest Festival

Sunday October 18, 2015from 2- 6 p.m.

At the farm; 7960 NW Dick Road, Hillsboro 97124

Lots of fun for the whole family:

Swiss alp horns, Traditional Mexican dancing, La Finquita’s own blue grass jam session players, and surprise performance , cider pressing, wood fired pizza oven, potluck, farm tours and festive fall wreaths and bird feeders for sale and much more

Please bring: your favorite pizza topping, a dish to share, a mason jar for cider, plates, cups and silverware for your family, a check book or cash to purchase items and contribute to the performers

MEATY UKRAINIAN BORSCHT

2 pounds beef flanken or short ribs
3 quarts of water
2 teaspoons coarse sea salt
1 medium carrot, scraped
1 medium celery root, peeled, 1/4 cut out for broth, remaining cut in
1/2-inch cubes
1 medium onion, unpeeled, stuck with several cloves
8 whole allspice berries
3 medium-large beets, without tops
2 tablespoons butter or vegetable oil
2 large onions, coarsely chopped
1 medium parsnip, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
2 medium turnips, cut in 1/2-inch cubes, or 2 cups chopped cabbage
1 large carrot, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
2 medium potatoes, cut in 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 well-rounded tablespoon tomato paste
8-10 large garlic cloves, crushed
Juice of 1/2 lemon, or more to taste MEATY UKRAINIAN BORSCHT

In a 5-6 quart pot, bring meat and water to boil over high heat. Reduce to simmer and skim of foam. When foam stops rising, add salt, carrot, 1/4 celery root, whole onion and allspice; simmer gently, partially covered for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until meat falls of the bone. Preheat oven to 400°F. Scub beets, wrap in foil and bake for an hour, or until just tender. Poke through foil with skewer to check for doneness. Peel beets; shred on coarse side of grater. When meat is very tender, remove, strip off bones, and cut into small cubes. Place in bowl; cover with foil. Strain broth. Rinse out pot. Place pot over medium heat, warm butter, and saute onion 2-3 minutes. Add cubed celery root, parsips, turnips and carrot. Saute 5 minutes. Add strained broth, potatoes and shredded beets. Bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Just before serving, while soup is simmering gently, stir in garlic and lemon juice. Remove from heat immediately. Serve pipping hot in flat bowls with dollop of sour cream and generous sprinkling of parsley and dill.

Cooking in the Litchfield Hills

Celeriac and Tomato Soup

4 tomatoes                            2 cups water

2 # celeriac                            ¼ cup lovage chopped (optional)

3  leeks                                   1 onion

1 clove garlic                        1 large carrot

1 tablespoon olive oil         2 T butter

3 sprigs parsley                    6 cups chicken broth

salt and freshly ground pepper

Peel, seed, and roughly chop tomatoes.  Peel sufficient celeriac to make 1 ½ pounds trimmed flesh, then cut into ½ inch cubes and drop into acidulated water.  Wash and trim leeks and, using only the white and light green parts, thinly slice.  You should have 1 ½ cups.  Chop onion and combine with leeks.  Chop garlic.  Thinly slice carrot. Heat together oil and butter and sauté leeks and onion until wilted.  Add garlic and carrot, and cook for 5 minutes longer,  Add one third of the tomatoes and cook until they are lightly browned on the edges and the juice is evaporated.  Add drained celeriac, the rest to the tomatoes and the parsley sprig.  Cook together for 10 minutes.  Add chicken broth, water and lovage (if using).  Bring to a boil and reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.  Puree, season with salt and pepper, and serve with croutons on the side.  (serves 8)  For thinner soup only use 1 pound celeriac and 3 tomatoes.

CELERY ROOT BISQUE WITH THYME CROUTONS
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup coarsely chopped shallots (about 3 large)
2 pounds celery roots (celeriac), peeled, woody parts trimmed and discarded, cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 5 1/2 cups)
1 10-ounce russet potato, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
5 cups low-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme

1/4 cup whipping cream
Additional chopped fresh thyme
Melt butter in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add celery; cover and cook until slightly softened, about 3 minutes. Add shallots; sauté uncovered 3 minutes. Stir in celery root cubes and potato, then broth and 1 1/2 teaspoons thyme. Increase heat to high; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 40 minutes. Cool slightly.

Working in batches, transfer soup to blender and puree until smooth. (Can be prepared 2 days ahead. Cool slightly. Cover and refrigerate.)

Stir cream into soup and bring to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into bowls. Sprinkle with additional chopped thyme and serve.

Bon Appétit
November 2005

 

 

Farmer John’s Cookbook, John Peterson (family favorite!!)

Serves 6-8

  • 3 T unsalted butter
  • 1 cup chopped scallions (about 6)
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pounds butternut squash, about ½ a large squash, peeled, seeded, cubed
  • 4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 14 ounce can whole tomatoes or 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh tomatoes
  • 12 whole curry leaves (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground mace (I skipped )
  • pinch freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat.  Add the scallions; sauté until soft and wilted, about 3 minutes.  Stir in the parsley, jalapeno, and garlic,; cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes.

Add the squash and toss to coat it with the scallion mixture.  Add the stock, tomatoes, curry leaves, all spice, mace and nutmeg.  Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered until the squash is very tender, about 45 minutes.  Let cool slightly.

Transfer the soup in batches to a blender or food processor; puree.

Transfer the soup back to the pot.  Stir in the curry powder and add salt, pepper to taste.  Return the soup to a simmer to heat through.  Garnish with the parsley just before serving.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE AND GINGER SHRIMP
24 large shrimp in shell (about 1 lb), peeled, leaving tail and first segment of shell intact, and deveined
1 tablespoon finely grated peeled fresh ginger
2/3 cup chopped shallot
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 whole star anise
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 3/4 lb butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (5 cups)
4 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs
Toss shrimp with ginger in a bowl and marinate, chilled, 30 minutes (do not marinate any longer or enzymes from ginger will begin to cook shrimp).

Make soup while shrimp marinate: 
Cook shallot, garlic, and anise in butter in a 3-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until shallot is softened, about 5 minutes. Add squash, stock, and water and simmer, uncovered, until squash is very tender, about 20 minutes. Remove star anise.

Purée soup in 2 batches in a blender (use caution when blending hot liquids) until very smooth, about 1 minute per batch, then transfer to cleaned pan and keep warm, covered.

Sprinkle marinated shrimp with salt. Heat oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté shrimp in 2 batches, stirring, until just cooked through, about 3 minutes per batch, transferring to paper towels.

Bring soup to a simmer and season with salt and pepper. Divide among 8 shallow soup bowls and mound 3 shrimp in each bowl.

Cooks’ note: 
. Soup (without shrimp) can be made 3 days ahead and chilled, covered. If making soup ahead, begin marinating shrimp about 40 minutes before serving.

Gourmet
December 2002

DELICATA SQUASH WITH ROSEMARY, SAGE, AND CIDER GLAZE

This is my favorite way to cook winter squash. You peel, and slice it, then cook it in a skillet with cider and
winter herbs. When most of the liquid boils away, the cider forms a tart-sweet glaze around the now-tender squash.

Delicata is a wonderfully firm-textured squash that’s not too sweet and almost like a potato. Other varieties like
acorn, turban, or kabocha will make good substitutes, but they may not hold their shape quite as well through the
braising.

2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm
winter squash
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary
1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice
1 cup water
2 teaspoons sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper

  1. Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.
  2. Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook,
    stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.
  3. Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender,
    20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

 

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Week #25

Week #25

  • Lettuce
  • Kohlrabi or radishes
  • Romanesco broccoli or cabbage
  • Kale
  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Peppers sweet
  • Peppers hot
  • Parsley
  • Eggplant
  • Green beans
  • Cukes or zukes (you choose)
  • Winter squash
  • Onions
  • Garlic

We made it through another week. Our goats found a way to sneak into the greenhouse again. They munched the kale, beet tops and all of the carrot tops. Fortunately some rogue chickens accompanied them and lead us to the defect in the chicken wire. We almost had a goat roast to celebrate, but we gave them one more chance. Those same chickens are making life difficult in the other greenhouse. Juvencio has prepared one of the field greenhouses. He cleared all the pumpkins, melons from summer and I have started transplanting. The chickens are right there pulling out the freshly planted lettuce. Half the time our struggles with farming come from our own animals.

I am getting ready to head over to OMSI for the first ever Harvest Festival. I will be there with Polly from Pumpkin Ridge Gardens. We will have our first sale of wreaths and bird feeders. The festival sounds like a lot of fun for the whole family and it is FREE! Stop in to see me at my booth. Juvencio is on his own this morning getting the harvest gathered and prepped. Jacob and Diego are off at college, Luna is celebrating her best friend’s birthday on a Segway tour and I am setting up the festival tent. I imagine the harvest will be ready no earlier than 2:00.

We are nearing the end of our regular season. We have 4 more weeks of veggies. We have our harvest festival on October 18 from 2-6 and we continue to harvest for you for 2 additional weeks. We will have a nice Thanksgiving harvest available for you to purchase to be picked up on 11/22 or 11/23. Be sure to let your family and friends know about La Finquita there will be space to add them in 2016. The early bird gets the worm, sign –up early!

We need your brown paper bags and strawberry boxes (hallocks). We can reuse all these items, please bring them and stack them neatly on the table behind the sink in the barn. We need your harvest help as well. We have October 4th covered with a large group of med students from OHSU. We plan to harvest all the winter squash and start planting the cover crop. We need your help until the end of October, so if you have not helped, or want to help again, please sign –up in the barn so that we know to expect you. You can also just show up and we will put you to work.

Have a great week.

From Marquita Farms:

Notes about Broccoli Romanesco written by Derek Morrick at Harmony Valley Farm:

Despite it’s name Broccoli Romanesco actually looks and acts more like a cauliflower. Well it doesn’t really look like anything else at all, but you know what I mean. One reference describes it’s appearance as part starfish and part wedding cake. The taste is similar to a cauliflower but with kind of a nutty flavor and the texture is somewhat creamier. Romanesco cooks like a cauliflower and will keep it’s shape and color for the most part although the green fades a little bit. You can also serve a whole Romanesco for a dramatic presentation by cutting off the leaves and cutting the stem end to make it flat. Then put into a pot with a lid and about ½ inch of water or stock. Let the Romanesco steam until tender, about 15 minutes. Otherwise if you are careful you can break off the spiraled florets and cook them as you normally would cauliflower. I like to season cauliflower gently with maybe just a little butter and some mild herbs like dill, tarragon or parsley. Or you can make kind of a creamy sauce to drizzle over the top, maybe flavored with fresh thyme and garlic or melted cheese. Or maybe a soup of pureed romanesco and cream with little florets of the romanesco for a garnish.

Julia’s notes: I use this vegetable just like cauliflower. It makes a dramatic appetizer when broken into florets and lightly steamed. “What’s that?!” will be a common response.

My favorite cauliflower preparations include steaming florets then tossing with a simple cheese or butter sauce, or simply sprinkled with a bit of rice wine vinegar. I also make a creamy cauliflower soup:

Julia’s Cauliflower Soup:

1 head broccoli romanesco or cauliflower, freshly harvested
1-2 onions, chopped (substitute leeksgreen onionsgreen garlic, depending on the season)
small amount olive oil
vegetable or chicken broth: about 4 cups
milk(optional) to thin out soup

cook up onions in the oil in a dutch oven, then add florets and cook everything over medium heat until browing somewhat. Add broth and cook another 20-30 minutes until everything is well cooked. Cool slightly, then puree with immersible blender. (I love this gadget!). Thin soup with milk if desired. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Julia’s Romanesco Salad 
This was inspired by a thought of a pasta salad or a couscous salad: but I didn’t want to wait to cook the grain. So I used romanesco (or cauliflower) as the main ingredient.

Cooked romanesco florets cooled after cooking, chopped into olive sized pieces
Sliced kalamata olives, or other favorite sliced olives
Small amount of chopped capers (1 tablespoon per 4 cups florets as a rough guide)
Chopped onion: Green onions, red onions, shallots, whatever you’ve got. If the onions are strong when chopped raw, use less and chop them fine.
S & P to taste
Lemon juice, freshly squeezed
Olive oil: I use a light hand
Fresh herb: I use basil, parsley, cilantro, or whatever I’ve got. Chopped

Mix and enjoy. I topped my salad with toasted sunflower seeds, another nut might also be delicious. And or a shredded or crumbled flavorful cheese such as gorgonzola, shaved parmesan…

Roasted Cauliflower with Green Garlic Dressing from Chef Jonathan Miller

I love roasting romanesco cauliflower. It really brings out the nuttiness in it. Tossed with a green garlic sauce, it becomes tender, nutty, and bright all at once. The bread crumbs really help this dish, so do take the time to make them yourself. And don’t forget to salt them while you brown them in the skillet.

1-2 heads cauliflower romanesco, cut into florets
3 green garlic stalks, chopped finely
1/4 c chopped parsley
zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 shallot, minced
white wine vinegar
olive oil
1-2 heads escarole, chopped
3 slices day old sourdough bread, chopped finely
2 hard cooked eggs, sliced

Heat the oven to 400 and toss the romanesco florets with some olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast on a baking sheet until softened and beginning to color, about 15 minutes, depending on your oven.

While the romanesco roasts, combine the green garlic, parsley, lemon zest, and shallot in a bowl.

Mix well, then add the lemon juice and a little bit of white wine vinegar. Add some olive oil in a stream, whisking constantly, until you have enough in there or a thick sauce. Taste and add a hit of salt and pepper. Taste again to make sure all the flavors are coming through and the sauce is lively and bright. Put the escarole in a large bowl. Heat a dry skillet and add a tablespoon of olive oil, then the bread crumbs and a touch of salt, stirring constantly, until toasted to golden brown. Remove from heat.

When the romanesco is done, transfer to a small bowl and toss with the green garlic sauce. Allow to

cool just slightly, then toss with the escarole. Taste. Adjust seasonings as you see fit, then top with the bread crumbs and hard cooked egg. Finish with a tiny bit of chopped parsley.

 

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week #24

Lettuce (2 heads this week)
Tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes
Sweet peppers
Hot peppers
Beans
Zucchini
Cucumbers
Kale
Parsley
Basil
Dill or cilantro
Spinach
Winter squash – Kabocha, Spaghetti, or Delicata
Onions
Garlic

We are in route from OSU back to Helvetia as I write this note. It is a great distraction from my heartache as we send child #2 off to college. We are so proud of Diego and all that he has accomplished and we know he will have a great experience in College. There will be a hug hole in our daily lives. We look forward to his visits and updates from him with all his new experiences.

I participated in an OSU extension summer vegetable field day last Thursday. We got to walk in the fields of the Willamette Valley field station farm and taste the tomatoes and shiso from the trials. Some amazing grape tomatoes from Johnny’s Seeds: “5 Star” and a new one called “cherry bomb” were my favorites. Benjo Seed Company bred my favorite “Mountain Magic”(a small tomato just larger than a cherry) and a few other less flavorful beef steaks that had late blight resistance. We also got to participate in a study of peppers as Cornell University works to breed a pepper that is tasty and aesthetically pleasing. It was fun, but I didn’t think any of the varieties were worth all that effort.

This week will be busy as we get our greenhouse #3 planted for fall and winter. We have spinach, lettuce, mustard and more transplanted. We hope to see some more daikon and other radishes to get us through the winter. Now that Diego is gone we have lost a radish eater, so I will be on my own to eat all that strong stuff. Next Sunday OMSI is hosting a fall harvest festival and I will be there with wreaths, fall décor and peppers. Please stop by and see me and share in the fall festivities from 10:00 to 4:00 in the parking lot at OMSI.

Our very own Harvest Festival is scheduled for October 18th from 2- 6. This is your chance to show off to your family and friends and invite people who might want to join next season. We have a great line up scheduled from the Helvetia Alp Horns to Mexico en la Piel (Mexican folkloric dancers) to Taeko drummers and our very own CSA member jam session. We will fire up the pizza oven and ask you all to bring a dish to pass. We hope you can all make it to the celebration. Our barn turns 100.

We are planning to have a Thanksgiving share again this year. We harvest the Sunday prior to Thanksgiving (November 22) and you can pick up 11/22 or 11/23. The harvest is usually huge with at least 20 items including a pie pumpkin for you to make your own homemade pie. The cost is $35 and must be pre-paid. The sign-up list will be in the barn in October.

No recipes today as I am not attached to the internet. I recommend looking at our winter squash recipes on the website. The Curry Squash soup is a favorite and uses up tons of veggies. We hope you are keeping up with all the veggies. Fortunately the onions, garlic and winter squash keep very well. Have a great week.

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Week #23/29

canning party better 2015

  • Lettuce
  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Hot peppers
  • Sweet peppers
  • Stuffing peppers
  • Eggplant (they came back!)
  • Beets
  • Celery or Romanesco broccoli (that greenish combo between broccoli and cauliflower)
  • Winter squash – you can easily leave these treasures on your counters until later in the fall, they will sweeten as they age
  • Basil
  • Dill or cilantro
  • Green beans
  • Kale or chard
  • Garlic
  • Onions (cipollinis this week, heirloom Italian flat onions, great for grilling!)
  • Leeks (use the white part, great for soup and stews)
  • tomatillos

The canning party was a great success. Mary Kay again was instrumental in the organization and leadership to get the right recipes started early so we could have them sit in their juices and get everything canned and ready to distribute by 4:30! The canning party is a labor of love that we put on as a community building/learning experience. Mary Kay and I meet sometime in August to decide on recipes and then she modifies them and often quadruples them. I do the shopping and organizing of the day and then there is the set up.  Juvencio borrowed tables from our neighbors and filled gas tanks.  We donate the produce (some extra beets came from our friends Polly and James at Pumpkin Ridge Gardens).Many others contributed in other ways, so thank you to all who helped make it happen and to the participants. A special thank you goes out to Mary Kay, without her you are left me and a decidedly less organized and efficient event!

We made 15 recipes:

  • Jardinere
  • Nuoc Cham (Asian dipping sauce)
  • Plum apple pear chutney
  • Pickled beets
  • Ketchup
  • Belizian Hot sauce (it is HOOOT)
  • Salsa Chipotle
  • Chipotle Adobo
  • Pickled radishes
  • Zucchini Relish
  • Zucchini pickles bread and butter style
  • Shallot marmalade
  • Onion jam
  • Pickled green beans
  • Zucchini Jam

If you want to get a recipe you can email Mary Kay at mkgehring@comcast.net and she will get it to you. I have many of the recipes as well, but she has a file that may be easier to access.

The Harvest Party is our next big event. We have a great line up of performers soon to be announced once they are confirmed. Mark your calendar for October 18 from 2-6. That is a Sunday to start after we complete the harvest. We need your help with harvest, fall is huge and our boys are heading back to college. We still have Luna but that is small crew for 80 shares. Please sign up and lend a hand harvesting your vegetables.

We will have a Thanksgiving harvest this year on November 22. This is an add on harvest that is a prepaid $35. More details as the season winds down. Our last harvest of the regular season is October 29th.

Have a great week!

Sweet Pepper and Lentil Soup
inspired by a recipe in Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Cookbook by Hensperger and Kaufmann

2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, or 2 leeks, chopped
3-5 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon freshly purchased paprika or smoked paprika
1-3 sweet peppers, depending on their size, seeded and finely chopped
1 cup dried brown or black lentils, picked over and rinsed
5 cups broth or water
S & P to taste (at least an entire teaspoon of salt for this one)
1-2 Tablespoons champagne or sherry or rice vinegar to finish the soup

Cook the onion in 1 Tablespoon oil over medium heat in a skillet until the onion/leeks begin to soften. Stir in paprika and allow it to cook for about a minute more. Add the chopped sweet pepper and cook for another 2-3 minutes, until everything begins to soften. Scrape all this into a slow cooker. Add the lentils and broth (or water) and stir to combine. Cover and cook on low until the lentils are completely soft, 7-9 hours. Season the soup with S & P (more salt if you used water, less if you used purchased broth), and last Tablespoon olive oil. Stir in 1 Tablespoon of one of the vinegars, adding more if needed. Serve hot.

Romesco Sauce for Crostini, Pasta, or as a vegetable dipper

4 large roasted yellow, orange, and or red peppers
1/2 cup toasted almonds
2 cloves garlic
1 ripe tomato
1 tsp salt
2 thick slices from a baguette
1 tsp paprika
½ cup or less olive oil
Fresh basil leaves if available
2-4 Tablespoons sherry vinegar

Whirl everything in a food processor. Serve with vegetables such as carrot sticks, lightly steamed broccoli and caulifower florets, etc. Bread and crackers work well too.

Multi Pepper Salad with Fontina
adapted from From the Cook’s Garden by Ellen Ogden

1.5 pounds Sweet peppers, roasted and cut into 1/4 inch strips
12 black olives, such as kalamata, pitted and coarsely chopped
6 ounces Fontina cheese, cut into 1/2 inch cubes (about 1.5 cups)
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon dijon mustard
1 teaspoon finely chopped cutting celery OR tarragon OR parsley
1/4 cup best extra virgin olive oil
S & P to taste

Combine the peppers, olives, and cheese. Mix the cream, lemon juice, mustard, and herb in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in the oil. Season with the S & P. Pour over the peppers and mix. Serve immediately.

Roasted Peppers Stuffed with Cherry Tomatoes, Onion, and Basil

4 red & yellow bell peppers
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 medium onion or one bunch green onions
1 cup packed fresh basil leaves
3 garlic cloves
about 3 tablespoons olive oil

Preheat oven to 425F and lightly oil a large shallow baking pan.

Halve bell peppers lengthwise and discard seeds and ribs. Arrange peppers, cut sides up, in baking pan and lightly oil cut edges and stems. Halve tomatoes and chop onion and basil. Finely chop garlic and in a bowl toss with tomatoes, onion, basil, 2 tablespoons oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Divide mixture among peppers and roast in upper third of oven until peppers are tender, about 20 minutes. adapted from Gourmet

Balsamic-Dressed Roasted Beets
A simple sweet-and-sour dressing complements earthy roasted beets. Its bright flavors make this dish a fitting accompaniment for roasted meats.
6 medium beets (about 2 1/2 pounds)
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar1 tablespoon sugar
1 star anise
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400°.
Leave root and 1 inch of stem on beets; scrub with a brush. Wrap beets in foil. Bake at 400° for 1 hour or until tender. Cool beets to room temperature. Peel and cut each beet into 8 wedges.
Combine juice, vinegar, sugar, and star anise in a small saucepan; bring to a boil. Cook until reduced to 1/3 cup (about 10 minutes). Discard star anise. Combine beets, vinegar mixture, salt, and pepper; toss well.

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup)

CALORIES 79(3% from fat); FAT 0.3g (sat 0.0g,mono 0.1g,poly 0.1g); PROTEIN 2.4g; CHOLESTEROL 0.0mg; CALCIUM 27mg; SODIUM 258mg; FIBER 4g; IRON 1.2mg; CARBOHYDRATE 17.9g
Cooking Light, NOVEMBER 2005

Beet and Leek Salad with Peanut Dressing

The beets, leeks, and dressing can all be prepared and stored separately in the refrigerator up to two days in advance; just let them all come close to room temperature before serving. The dressing gets thicker as it stands, so add more water to thin it if necessary. To avoid staining your hands when rubbing the skins off the beets, wear gloves or rub the beets under running water.
2 medium beets (about 3/4 pound)
Cooking spray
4 cups thinly sliced leek (about 1 pound)
1/2 teaspoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
1/4 cup water
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter
1 1/2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
2 cups alfalfa sprouts

Preheat oven to 425°.
2. Leave root and 1 inch of stem on beets; scrub with a brush. Place beets on a small baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 425° for 1 hour or until tender when pierced with a fork. Cool. Trim off beet roots and stem; rub off skins. Cut each beet in half lengthwise; slice each beet half crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices.
Combine leek, oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray; toss well to coat. Bake at 425° for 15 minutes or until tender and just beginning to brown; stir after 8 minutes.
Combine water, lime juice, peanut butter, ginger, and 1/4 teaspoon salt, stirring well with a whisk until smooth.
Arrange 1/3 cup sprouts on each of 6 salad plates; divide the beets and leek evenly among servings. Drizzle about 2 teaspoons dressing over each serving.

CALORIES 84(23% from fat); FAT 2.1g (sat 0.4g,mono 1g,poly 0.5g); PROTEIN 2.9g; CHOLESTEROL 0.0mg; CALCIUM 49mg; SODIUM 266mg; FIBER 3.1g; IRON 1.9mg; CARBOHYDRATE 15.1g Cooking Light, MARCH 2005 Yield: 6 servings

Rochelle’s Beet Salad
We love it, it’s fast, easy and healthy.

I just threw it together, so it’s a simple one. trim ends off beets, then steam until soft rinse with cold water, so that the skin peels right off. dice up, mix with thinly sliced onions, (red, white or yellow), add crumbled crostini, and plenty of balsamic vinegar, salt/pepper to taste with a dash of extra virgin olive oil. Toss, EAT.

 

 

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Week #22

Week #22

  • Parsley
  • Tomatoes
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Sweet peppers
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Onions (torpedo! – Italian heirloom)
  • Garlic
  • Hot peppers
  • Winter squash –green and red kabocha squash or colorful “Carnival”
  • Basil
  • Green beans
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Red cabbage or giant kohlrabi
  • Carrots

 

What a wet harvest it was this morning! The temperature change affected everyone including the farmers! The tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and beans  really hate the cool nights, dropping into the mid 40’s here at the farm. They all seemed to get the message that the summer is over and fall is here. We are not ready to switch gears but as we donned rain gear (or didn’t) we had a very cold and soggy harvest.

The cool weather crops took a giant leap this week, the broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage are all doubled in size. We tried a new variety of kale from Spain and it is over 4 feet tall with leaves that are 2 feet long. We are not quite sure what to do with it, just prepping you all so you are prepared when it shows up in the cooler. The giant kohlrabi today is about the size of a volley ball.

The canning party is set for next weekend, Saturday September 12. I may do some last minute changes in the recipes as fall has come early, but we will see how the week progresses. If you have signed up to participate please arrive by 0900 and bring all the items on the list. Your jars need to be run through your washing machine and placed back in the boxes. Lids do not need any special treatment. Please do bring a dish to pass as we will likely work up an appetite canning all day. We will aim to be done with all the canning and processing by 5:00. If you have surplus fruit at your house please contact me to discuss how we can incorporate it! My cell is included in the email sent to your email.

Enjoy your Labor Day holiday, veggies are ready for pick-up. We know some of you are out of town so pick up on Tuesday is fine for this week.

Stir-Fried Kohlrabi from The Goodness of Potatoes and Root Vegetables by John Midgley

3 kohlrabi, peeled
3 medium carrots
4 tablespoons peanut or safflower oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
1 inch piece gingerroot, peeled and thinly sliced
green onions, sliced
1-2 fresh chili peppers, sliced, optional
salt
4 tablespoons oyster sauce (optional)
3 teaspoons sesame oil & soy sauce, each

Slice kohlrabi and carrots into thin ovals. Heat oil in large heavy skillet; when it begins to smoke, toss in garlic and ginger. Stir once then add kohlrabi and carrots; toss and cook 2 minutes. Add green onions and chilies; stir-fry 1 minute, then pour in ½ cup water. Cover, reduce heat and cook 5 minutes. Remove cover and toss in a little salt and the sesame and soy, and oyster if using. Serve with rice.

Roasted Kohlrabi with Crunchy Seeds
Adapted from Perfect Vegetables by the Cook’s Illustrated Team

3 medium kohlrabi bulbs, peeled and cut into ¾ inch cubes
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons sesame seeds
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
½ teaspoon fennel seeds, coarsely chopped
S & P to taste
Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss the kohlrabi, oil, seeds, and S & P together in a large bowl until combined. In a single layer spread the mixture onto a rimmed baking sheet. Roast (with rack in middle position), shaking pan occasionally, until the kohlrabi is browned and tender, about 30 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and adjust seasonings to taste, serve immediately.

Kohlrabi Pickle Chips from the Victory Garden Cookbook

1-2 pounds smallish kohlrabi, trimmed
3 small onions
1/4 cup pickling salt
2 cups vinegar
2/3 cup sugar
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon tumeric

Peel and thinly slice kohlrabi and onions. Mix salt with 1 quart ice water, pour over the vegetables, and soak for 3 hours. Drain, rinse, and place in a bowl. Bring remaining ingredients to a boil, cook for 3 minutes, and pour over the vegetables. Cool, cover and refrigerate for 3 days.

Red Cabbage Salad with Apples and Walnuts
from chef Jonathan Miller

2 dozen walnuts, shelled (or use 3/4 cup shelled meats)
1 TBS walnut oil
1 small head red cabbage, chopped into bite sized pieces
1 garlic clove, chopped
2 TBS balsamic vinegar
3 TBS olive oil
1/2 red onion, sliced
1 fennel, cored and sliced
4-6 oz goat cheese
2 small apples, sliced into thin wedges
2 TBS parsley, chopped
2 TBS marjoram, chopped

Roast walnuts in a hot oven about 10 minutes, then toss (while hot) with the walnut oil, and a bit of salt and pepper. In a large skillet, warm the olive oil, vinegar, and garlic together. As soon as they are hot, add the onion and fennel. Cook to crisp-soft, just a few minutes. Add the cabbage and cook just until it is slightly wilted, maybe another couple minutes. Remove from heat, season with salt and pepper, then fold in the goat cheese, the apple, the herbs, and the walnuts. Check again for seasoning and serve warm.

Red Cabbage and Onion Relish from Almost Vegetarian by Diana Shaw

1 small head red cabbage
1 T unsalted butter
2 red onions, thinly sliced
1 T minced fresh dill
1 T cider vinegar
1/4 cup dried cherries
1 T honey

Tear away and discard the tough outer leaves of the cabbage. Cut the core out of the head, and slice the rest. Bring a large pot of water with a steamer basket to a boil over med. heat and steam the cabbage until cooked through, about 15 min. Turn it into a colander to drain thoroughly.

In a large skillet, melt the butter. Saute the onions and dill over med. heat , stirring often, until the onions are very soft, about 10 min. Add the drained cabbage and stir well to blend.

Stir in the cider vinegar, dried cherries, and honey. Cover and cook over med-low heat, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes.

Turn off the heat and let the relish rest for another 15 minutes so that the flavors can deepen. Serve at once or cover and serve well chilled.

CABBAGE AND CARROT SLAW

4 cups finely shredded carrot
4 cups finely shredded red cabbage
1/2 cup rice vinegar (available at Asian markets and some supermarkets)
1 tablespoon sugar, or to taste
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste

In a large bowl toss together the carrot and the cabbage. In a small
bowl whisk together the vinegar,
the sugar, the oil, and the salt. Just before serving add the dressing
to the vegetables and toss the slaw
well.

Roast Squash Appetizers from Chef Jonathan Miller

1 acorn squash
1-2 T mascarpone cheese
4-6 sage leaves, chopped
2 portabella mushrooms
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 sour baguette, refreshed in the oven and then sliced into thin rounds
chives, chopped

Heat the oven to 400. Cut the squash in half, lengthwise, and put cut side down on some parchment on a baking sheet. Roast in the oven until very soft and caramelized, 45-60 minutes. Cool and scoop out the seeds and strings. Then scoop out the flesh and mash it together in a small bowl. Add a little salt, the mascarpone, and the sage.
Taste for seasoning. While the squash roasts, roast the portabella caps. Discard the stems, and drizzle some olive oil, some salt, and some of the garlic on the gill side of each portabella cap. Roast those in the oven for 10-15 minutes, or until very soft. When cool, cut into small wedges. Spread a little roasted squash on a crostini, top it with a wedge or two of mushroom, finish with a little chive sprinkle, and serve.

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